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Full text of "Undergraduate Bulletin of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro"

■ 



THE UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA 

GREENSBORO 



9H 

Bill 
Hip 




Please note that this bulletin is intended for informational purposes only. Although the publisher has made every reasonable effort to attain 
factual accuracy herein, no responsibility is assumed for editorial, clerical, or printing errors, or error occasioned by mistake. The publisher has 
attempted to present information which, at the time for printing, most accurately describes the course offerings, faculty listings, policies, procedures, 
regulations, and requirements of the University. However, it does not establish contractual relationships. Requirements, rules, procedures, courses, 
and informational statements are subject to change. The University reserves the right to revise any part without notice or obligation. 

Equality of Educational Opportunity 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is committed to equality of educational opportunity and does not discriminate against 
applicants, students, or employees based on race, color, creed, gender, national origin, political affiliation, religion, sexual orientation, age, or 
disability. Moreover, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is open to people of all races and actively seeks to promote diversity. 

This commitment is in keeping with Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The 
Affirmative Action Officer, PO Box 26170, UNCG, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170, (336/334-5009), is responsible for coordinating compliance and 
investigating complaints. 

Policy on Discriminatory Conduct 

(Approved by the Chancellor, April 27, 1990; Amended September 10, 2001) 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is committed to the principle that educational and employment decisions should be based 
on an individual's abilities and qualifications and should not be based on personal characteristics or beliefs that have no relevance to academic 
ability or to job performance. Accordingly, UNCG supports policies, curricula and co-curricular activities that encourage understanding of and 
appreciation for all members of its community. UNCG will not tolerate any harassment of, discrimination against, or disrespect for persons. 
UNCG is committed to equal opportunity in education and employment for all persons regardless of race, color, creed, religion, gender, age, 
national origin, disability, military veteran status, political affiliation or sexual orientation. 

This policy applies internally as well as to the University's relationships with outside organizations, except to the extent that those 
organizations, including the federal and State government, the military, ROTC, or private employers do not yet recognize sexual orientation as 
protected. 

The University's educational and employment practices are consistent with Section 103 of The Code of The University of North Carolina. In 
addition, the University complies with North Carolina General Statutes 126-16 and 126-17, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, 
the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1988, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with 
Disabilities Act of 1990, the Vietnam Era Veteran's Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, and other federal and state laws relating to discrimination 
in educational programs and employment. In accord with Executive Order 11246, the University has in place an Affirmative Action Plan which 
states the University's commitment to the concept and practice of equal employment opportunity for all persons regardless of race, color, creed, 
religion, gender, age, national origin, disability, military veteran status, political affiliation or sexual orientation. 

Any employee who believes he or she has been treated unfairly based on any of the above characteristics should contact his or her immediate 
supervisor, or the next level supervisor if the immediate supervisor is the subject of the allegation. Students should contact the Office of Student 
Affairs. 

Retaliatory action of any kind will not be tolerated against any person for making a good faith report of discrimination or on the basis of 
that person's participation in any allegation, investigation or proceeding related to the report of discriminatory conduct. Every UNCG employee 
and student is charged with the responsibility to be aware of and abide by this policy. Failure to abide by this policy may subject the violator to 
disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. 

This policy may also be found at www.uncg.edu/apl/POLICIES/ivb005.html. 

Equity in Athletics Statement 
Pursuant to the federal Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act, information about equity in UNCG's intercollegiate athletics programs may be 
obtained from the UNCG Athletic Department, 337 HHP Building, UNCG, Greensboro, NC 27402. 

Right-To-Know Statement 
Pursuant to the federal Student Right-to- Know Act, UNCG graduation rates may be obtained from the Office of Student Academic Services, 
159 Mossman Building, UNCG, PO Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170. 

Catalog Issue for the Year 2008-09 

Announcements for 2009-10 

Vol. 97, No. 2 

www.uncg.edu/reg/Catalog/index.html 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro Undergraduate Bulletin (USPS #689-620) is edited and published by the Office of the University 
Registrar, 180 Mossman Building, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, USPS #689-620, PO Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170. 
Announcements are published in print four times each year: March, June, August, and October. Periodical postage paid at Greensboro, NC. 
15,000 copies of this public document were printed at a cost of $39,583.00 or $2.64 per copy. 

© 

The Undergraduate Bulletin is printed on recycled paper stock, composed of approximately 30% postconsumer waste. 



Karen D. Haywood, Editor 
University Registrar's Office 



POSTMASTER: Please send change of address to: Office of Undergraduate Admissions, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 
PO Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170. 



THE UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA 

GREENSBORO 



One-Hundred-and-Eighteenth 

Annual 

Undergraduate 

Bulletin 



2009-10 



The Undergraduate Bulletin is also available on the Web at 
www.uncg.edu/reg 



Academic Calendars 



Fall Semester 2009 

August 16-21, Sun.-Fri. 

August 18, Tuesday 
August 18, Tuesday 
August 19, Wednesday 
August 24, Monday 
August 24-28, Mon.-Fri. 
August 28, Friday 
August 28, Friday 

August 28, Friday 
August 31, Monday 
September 1-30 

September 7, Monday 
September 11, Friday 
October 2, Friday 
October 5, Monday 
October 9, Friday 
October 14, Wednesday 
October 16, Friday 
October 30, Friday 
Oct. 22-Nov. 20, Thu.-Fri. 
November 1, Sunday 
Nov. 2-22, Mon.-Sun. 
November 13, Friday 
November 23, Monday 
November 24, Tuesday 
November 30, Monday 
December 7, Monday 
December 8, Tuesday 

December 8, Tuesday 
December 9-11, 14-16, 

Wed.-Fri., Mon.-Wed. 
December 12, Saturday 
December 17, Thursday 
December 18, Friday 



Orientation, Advising, Registration for all students based on student population 

and classification 
Fall semester opens 

Undergraduate academic suspension appeals deadline 
State of the Campus Address and Faculty Convocation 
Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. 
Late registration and schedule adjustment 

Last day to change course or course section without special permission 
Financial Aid satisfactory academic progress appeals deadline; hours locked for 

financial aid purposes 
Last day to drop course for tuition and fees refund 
Deadline for graduate students to apply to graduate in December 2009 
Undergraduate students planning to either declare or change major should do so 

during this time 
Labor Day holiday. Classes dismissed; offices closed. 
Final deadline for undergraduates to apply to graduate in December 2009 
Six weeks progress reports due in University Registrar's Office 
Founders Day 

Instruction ends for Fall Break 6:00 p.m. 
Classes resume after Fall Break 8:00 a.m. 
Last day to drop course without academic penalty 
Final date for December doctoral candidates oral examinations 
Spring semester advising for continuing students, by appointment 
Deadline for undergraduates to apply to student teach during fall 2010 
Spring 2010 registration for continuing students 

Filing deadline for one signed copy of dissertation, The Graduate School 
Filing deadline for one copy of thesis, The Graduate School 
Instruction ends for Thanksgiving holiday 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume 8:00 a.m. 
Last Day of Classes 

Final date for complete clearance of December graduate degree candidates. 
Deadline for final submission of thesis or dissertation to The Graduate School. 
Reading Day 
Final examinations 

Tentative official final exam makeup day 
December Commencement, Greensboro Coliseum 
Tentative official final exam makeup day 



Contact the UNCG Counseling and Testing Center for exact dates of qualifying examinations. 
2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Calendars 



Spring Semester 2010 

January 10-15, Sun.-Fri. 

January 12, Tuesday 
January 18, Monday 
January 19, Tuesday 
January 19-25, Tues.-Mon. 
January 25, Monday 

January 25, Monday 
January 25, Monday 
January 26, Tuesday 
February 1-28 
February 5, Friday 
February 15, Monday 
March 2, Tuesday 
March 5, Friday 
March 6, Saturday 
March 15, Monday 
March 16, Tuesday 
Mar. 23-Apr. 23, Tues.-Fri. 
March 24, Wednesday 
April 1-23, Thu.-Fri. 
April 2, Friday 
April 7, Wednesday 
April 20, Tuesday 
May 4, Tuesday 
May 5, Wednesday 

May 5, Wednesday 
May 5, Wednesday 
May 6-8, 10-12, 

Thur.-Sat, Mon.-Wed. 
May 14, Friday 

Summer Session 2010 

May 17, Monday 
May 19, Wednesday 
May 26, Wednesday 
May 28, Friday 
June 22, Tuesday 
June 24, Thursday 
June 28, Monday 
July 5, Monday 
July 29, Thursday 
August 9, Monday 
August 11, Wednesday 

Contact the 



Orientation, Advising, Registration for all students based on student population 

and classification 
Undergraduate academic appeals deadline 
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Offices closed. 
Classes Begin 8:00 a.m. 
Late registration and schedule adjustment 
Financial Aid satisfactory academic progress appeals deadline; hours locked for 

financial aid purposes 
Last day to change course or course section without special permission 
Last day to drop a course for tuition and fees refund 
Deadline for graduate students to apply to graduate in May 2010 
Undergraduate students declare or change major in February. 
Final deadline for undergraduates to apply to graduate in May 2010 
Deadline for undergraduates to apply to student teach during spring 2011 
Six weeks progress reports due in University Registrar's Office 
Financial Aid priority filing date for 2010-11 academic year 
Instruction ends for Spring Break 1:00 p.m. 
Classes resume after Spring Break 8:00 a.m. 
Last day to drop course without academic penalty 
Summer and/or fall advising for continuing students, by appointment 
Final date for May doctoral candidates oral examinations 
Summer and/or fall 2010 registration for continuing students 
Spring holiday. Classes dismissed; offices closed. 

Deadline for filing one signed copy of dissertation, The Graduate School 
Deadline for filing one copy of thesis, The Graduate School 
University follows Friday Schedule; last day of classes 
Final date for complete clearance of May candidates for graduate degrees. 
Deadline for final submission of thesis or dissertation to The Graduate School. 
Reading Day 
Excellence Day 
Final Examinations 

May Commencement, Greensboro Coliseum 



MBA first summer session classes begin 
First summer session classes begin 

Deadline for graduate students to apply to graduate in summer 2010 
Final deadline for undergraduates to apply to graduate in summer 2010 
First summer session final examinations 
Second summer session classes begin 
MBA second summer session classes begin 
Independence Day holiday. Classes dismissed; offices closed. 
Second summer session final examinations 
MBA second summer session classes end 
Summer graduation date 
UNCG Counseling and Testing Center for exact dates of qualifying examinations. 
2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Contents 



Inside Front Cover 

Equality of Educational Opportunity 
Policy on Discriminatory Conduct 
Equity in Athletics Statement 
Right-to-Know Statement 

1 Introduction 

Academic Calendars for 2009-1 2 

Chancellor's Welcome 6 

UNCG Profile 7 

Academic Programs 7 

The University Community 8 

Accreditation 9 

Mission Statement 9 

Vision Statement 9 

UNCG's Vision for Teaching & Learning 9 

Affirmative Action Program 10 

2 Admission to the University 

Required Secondary School Units 11 

Freshmen 11 

Transfer Students 12 

2Plus Students 13 

Admissions Decision 13 

International Students 13 

Visiting Students 15 

Adult Students 16 

Former UNCG Students 16 

Second Baccalaureate Degree Students 16 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 17 

Part-Time Degree Students 17 

Additional Admissions Requirements 17 

Immunization Clearance 18 

Entrance Deficiencies 19 

Transfer Credit Regulations 19 

Course Credit & Advanced Placement 20 

Credit for Military Training 22 

Inter-institutional Registration 22 

Auditors 22 

Summer Session 23 

Division of Continual Learning 23 

Senior Citizens 23 

Veterans 23 

Army and Air Force ROTC 23 

Accelerated Master's Programs for Undergraduates 23 

Graduate Students 23 

3 Expenses, Payments, Refunds, & Financial Aid 

Tuition & Fees: Estimated Annual Expenses 24 

Residence Status for Tuition Purposes 24 

Tuition & Fees: Table for Undergraduates 25 

Tuition Surcharge for Undergraduates 26 

Housing Plans 27 

Meal Plans 27 

Miscellaneous Fees & Expenses 27 

Payment of Tuition & Fees; Payment Plans 28 

Student Credit Policy 28 

UNCG Refund Policy 29 

Financial Aid 31 

Grants & Scholarships 32 

Loans 34 

Research Assistantships 35 

Student Employment 35 



4 Academic Regulations & Policies 

Supporting Offices 36 

Undergraduate Academic Requirements & Limits Summary 37 

The Academic Integrity Policy 37 

Declaring or Changing Majors 37 

Registering for Courses 37 

Course Selection 38 

Adding & Dropping Courses 38 

Withdrawal from the University 39 

Withdrawal for Students Called to Active Military Duty 39 

Auditing Courses 39 

Class Attendance 39 

Grading Policies and Grades 40 

Academic Renewal 42 

Grade Replacement Policy 42 

Deans' List 42 

Chancellor's List 42 

Classification of Students 43 

Academic Good Standing at UNCG 43 

Academic Probation 43 

Academic Suspension and Appeals 43 

Credit Regulations & Credit Limits 45 

Placement Examinations 45 

Average Time to Graduation 46 

Steps to Graduation 46 

Other Regulations 48 

Second or Simultaneous Undergraduate Degrees 48 

Dual Registration Status 48 

5 University Requirements 

Undergraduate Degrees & General Degree Requirements 49 

General Education Program 49 

Philosophy 49 

Student Learning Goals 50 

GEC Category and GE Marker Descriptions 50 

GEC Category and GE Marker Requirements 51 

Writing Intensive Courses 52 

Speaking Intensive Courses 52 

Basic Technology Competencies 52 

Information & Research Competencies 53 

Definitions of Academic Program Terminology 53 

Special Curriculum Option Plan II Programs 54 

Guide to Course Descriptions 54 

General Education Core Courses by Category Table 58 

General Education Marker Courses Table 68 

General Education Course Summary Table 76 

6 Academic Units & Areas of Study 

College of Arts & Sciences 88 

College Additional Requirements (CAR) 88 

Writing Intensive Requirements 89 

Study Abroad 90 

Career Skills Packages for Majors in the College 91 

Professional Certificates in the College 92 

Joseph M. Bryan School of Business & Economics 96 

School of Education 99 

School of Health & Human Performance 100 

School of Human Environmental Sciences 102 

Lloyd International Honors College 103 

School of Music 105 

School of Nursing 106 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



7 Academic Departments, Programs, & Courses (course prefix) 

Accounting & Finance (ACC, FIN) 107 

African American Studies (AFS) 112 

Anthropology (ATY) 114 

Archaeology Program 119 

Art (ART) 121 

Biology (BIO) 130 

Business Administration (BUS, MGT, MKT) 139 

Chemistry & Biochemistry (CHE) 148 

Classical Studies (CCI, GRK, LAT) 155 

Communication Sciences & Disorders (CSD) 163 

Communication Studies (CST) 166 

Computer Science (CSC) 170 

Conflict Studies and Dispute Resolution 174 

Consumer, Apparel, & Retail Studies (APD, CRS, RCS) 174 

Counseling & Educational Development (CED) 178 

Dance (DCE) 179 

Economics (ECO) 184 

Educational Leadership & Cultural Foundations (ELC) 189 

Educational Research Methodology (ERM) 190 

English (ENG) 190 

Entrepreneurship (ENT) 197 

Environmental Studies (ENV) 199 

Freshman Seminars (FMS) 202 

Genetic Counseling (GEN) 203 

Geography (GEO) 203 

German and Russian (GER, RUS, JNS, CHI) 208 

Gerontology (GRO) 214 

Grogan College 214 

History (HIS, WCV) 215 

Honors Programs (HSS) 224 

Human Development & Family Studies (HDF) 229 

Humanities (BLS) 235 

Information Systems & Operations Management 

(ISM, SCM) 236 

Interior Architecture (IAR) 240 

International and Global Studies Program (IGS) 244 

Kinesiology (ESS) 247 

Liberal Studies, Special Programs in 261 

Library & Information Studies (LIS) 261 

Linguistics (LIN) 261 

Mathematics & Statistics (MAT, STA) 262 

Media Studies (MST) 269 

Medical Technology Program 276 

Music (MUS) 278 

Nursing (NUR) 292 

Nutrition (NTR) 303 

Philosophy (PHI) 306 

Physics & Astronomy (PHY, AST) 310 

Political Science (PSC) 314 

Preprofessional Programs 319 

Psychology (PSY) 323 

Public Health Education (HEA) 328 

Recreation, Tourism, & Hospitality Management 

(HTM, RPM) 333 

Religious Studies (REL) 340 

Ashby Residential College (RCO) 344 

Romance Languages (FRE, ITA, POR, SPA) 346 

Social Work (SWK) 355 

Sociology (SOC) 358 

Specialized Education Services (SES) 364 

Cornelia Strong College 376 

Study Abroad Programs 377 

Teacher Education and Higher Education (TED) 378 

Teachers Academy & Licensure Programs (EDU) 384 

Theatre (THR) 387 

University Studies (UNS) 396 



Women's & Gender Studies Program (WGS) 396 

Accelerated Master's Programs for Undergraduates 399 

8 The University Community 

Academic Integrity & Student Conduct Policies 405 

Housing 405 

Dining Services 406 

Parking Regulations 406 

UNCG Police 406 

Services for Students 407 

Campus Opportunities 413 

Affiliated Clubs and Organizations 415 

Athletics & Recreation 418 

Intercollegiate Athletics 418 

Campus Recreation 418 

University Advancement, Alumni, & Friends of UNCG 419 

9 University History, Officers, Faculty, & Governance 

History of The University of North Carolina 422 

Officers of The University of North Carolina 423 

Board of Governors 423 

History of UNCG 424 

UNCG Board of Trustees 424 

UNCG Officers 424 

Faculty 427 

Teaching 427 

Emerita/Emeritus 446 

Library 452 

Adjunct 453 

Faculty Senate & Committee Structures 456 

10 Academic References 

UNCG Enrollment & Degree Statistics 460 

Academic Program Inventory & CIP Codes 461 

Undergraduate Area of Study (AOS) Codes 462 

New Programs & Program Revisions, Effective Fall 2009 464 

Major Codes (Undergraduate) 465 

Appendices 

Appendix A: Residence Status for Tuition Purposes 466 

Appendix B: The University of North Carolina Policy on 

Illegal Drugs 467 

Index of Topics 469 

Map of UNCG inside back cover 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Chancellor's Welcome 




Linda P. Brady 
Chancellor 



I am delighted to welcome you to the UNCG 
community, a special place where you will 
experience living and learning within an 
exceptionally beautiful and vibrant campus. 
We are committed to cultivating a diverse 
university that promotes student success, 
provides access to a variety of opportunities, 
shares your passion for discovery, and prepares 
you to pursue a meaningful life. 

At UNCG, student success is our number one 
priority. You are offered intellectual challenges, 
encouragement in your personal and social life, 
and opportunities to develop new leadership 
skills through a variety of campus organizations 
and activities. Here, learning often takes place in 
small settings inside and outside the classroom. 
As UNCG's impressive research and service 
enterprise continues to expand, professors 
regularly invite undergraduates to work 
alongside them in the laboratory and in our 
communities. I encourage you to take advantage 
of these and other special academic experiences 
such as the honors program, study abroad, and 
internships. 



The Undergraduate Bulletin is one of your most valuable resources as you 
undertake your academic career. It describes the nature of our academic 
programs and student support services as well as the policies that govern 
them. Please take the time to become familiar with this important text. 

I am confident that you will find faculty and staff who are committed to 
providing a supportive environment and who will help you realize your 
full potential and achieve your educational goals. I wish you all the best. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



1. Introduction 



UNCG Profile 



The institution that is now The University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro was chartered in 1891 to provide higher 
education for women. Formerly The Woman's College, and 
one of the three original institutions of The Consolidated Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, UNCG has been highly regarded 
now for over one hundred years for both its strong liberal 
arts tradition and its excellent professional preparation 
for selected careers. In 1963, it became a doctoral-granting, 
coeducational university, and is now classified as a research 
university (high research activity) by the Carnegie Founda- 
tion. UNCG is a member of the National Association of State 
Universities and Land Grant Colleges (NASULGC) and the 
American Association of Colleges and Universities (AASCU). 
See chapter 9, History of UNCG, for more details. 

In fall 2008, the student body of UNCG was comprised 
of approximately 16,703 men and women, including 13,453 
undergraduates and 3,250 graduate students. The Division of 
Continual Learning has grown to a total enrollment in aca- 
demic credit courses of 771. Students from all 50 states and 
56 foreign countries were represented in the student body. 
Undergraduate minority enrollment was 35%, including 
21.6% African- American students. Approximately 67% of 
UNCG students received some type of financial aid. 

Among the 1,055 faculty members are nationally known 
scholars whose research and creative work regularly contrib- 
ute new knowledge to their fields; 80.7% of full-time faculty 
hold terminal degrees in their disciplines. The estimated ratio 
of students to faculty was 16 to 1 in fall 2008. See chapter 9 for 
a listing of Teaching Faculty. 

UNCG faculty members remain committed to excellence 
in teaching, research, and public service, and are easily acces- 
sible to students through an advisory system and on an infor- 
mal basis. 



Academic Programs 

The University is organized into a College of Arts and 
Sciences and six professional schools— the Joseph M. Bryan 
School of Business and Economics; School of Education; 
School of Health and Human Performance; School of Human 
Environmental Sciences; School of Music; and School of Nurs- 
ing. Undergraduates have a choice of over 100 areas of study 
from which to select a major or concentration within a major 
leading to one of seven undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of 
Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), Bachelor of Music 



(B.M.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Science in Medi- 
cal Technology (B.S.M.T), Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
(B.S.N.), and Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.). 

The UNCG Board of Trustees, acting within the frame- 
work outlined for UNCG by The University of North Caro- 
lina Board of Governors, determines general directions for 
UNCG's academic programs. Direct responsibility for admin- 
istering academic programs rests within the various academic 
units. 

The Chancellor has the responsibility for the administra- 
tion of all campus programs, academic and non-academic. 
The Provost coordinates and oversees the graduate and 
undergraduate academic programs on the UNCG campus. 

The University faculty through the Faculty Senate, the 
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, and the General 
Education Council determines the general framework for 
UNCG undergraduate degree requirements and approves the 
programs proposed by academic units. 

Approximately 2,090 courses offered in more than 4,200 
sections are available each semester. In addition, UNCG par- 
ticipates in several inter-institutional agreements, including 
the Greater Greensboro Consortium (with Bennett College, 
Elon University, Greensboro College, Guilford Technical 
Community College, High Point University, and North Caro- 
lina Agricultural and Technical State University), the North 
Carolina Inter-Institutional Agreement (with Duke Univer- 
sity, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina State 
University, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
and The University of North Carolina at Charlotte), and the 
UNC Inter-institutional Agreement (with all of the UNC sys- 
tem schools) designed for online courses. 

Degree-seeking students may cross-register through 
the Greater Greensboro Consortium and the North Carolina 
Inter-institutional Agreement at no extra cost. Students who 
register through the UNC Inter-Institutional Agreement will 
pay the appropriate tuition and fees to the visited campus. 

The University also offers four doctoral degrees in 25 
areas of study, master's degrees in a wide variety of concen- 
trations, and several post-baccalaureate and post-master's 
certificates. The Graduate School Bulletin describes these pro- 
grams in complete detail. 

Most undergraduate degree programs require 122 
semester hours with a minimum of 27 hours of work in the 
major. See University Requirements and Academic Units for 
complete descriptions of academic programs and University 
degree requirements. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Introduction 



Many special academic programs are also available 
for undergraduates. Among these, Teacher Education has a 
long tradition. Four UNCG schools and several departments 
within the College of Arts and Sciences offer programs lead- 
ing to teacher licensure in North Carolina and qualification 
for licensure in most other states. Students may select licen- 
sure programs in 19 subject areas. See Teachers Academy for 
complete details. 

The Honors Programs, administered by the Lloyd Inter- 
national Honors College, provide opportunities for broad 
interdisciplinary study, for advanced work in the major, 
and independent projects leading to special recognition at 
graduation. 

Special interdepartmental academic programs offer 
majors and minors in African American Studies, Archaeol- 
ogy, Environmental Studies, International and Global Stud- 
ies, Humanities, Medical Technology, and Women's and Gen- 
der Studies. 

UNCG's preprofessional programs offer all courses 
required for admission to medical or dental schools, to 
pharmacy, veterinary, or physical and occupational therapy 
schools, or as needed for entrance into law school. A two-year 
pre-engineering curriculum prepares students to transfer to 
schools with engineering programs. 

Independent study, tutorials, and internships are avail- 
able in most schools and departments. 

Ashby Residential College, Cornelia Strong College, and 
lone Grogan College each provide unique settings for innova- 
tive study and unity of academic and social experiences for 
students. 

Students interested in study abroad for academic credit 
may select from several opportunities available through sum- 
mer study, semester abroad, or the junior year abroad pro- 
gram. See Study Abroad for complete descriptions. 

The University Community 

The 81 buildings on the attractively landscaped campus 
on Spring Garden Street reflect the 1 18-year history of the Uni- 
versity from the oldest, Foust (1892), to those currently under 
construction and renovation. The newly renovated Forney 
and Petty buildings are the latest elements of the UNCG cam- 
pus makeover funded by the Higher Education Bonds passed 
in 2000. The Gatewood Studio Arts Building and the Moore 
Humanities & Research Administration Building opened in 
fall 2006. The science building, recently renamed the Patricia 
A. Sullivan Science Building, opened in time for the fall 2003 
semester. 



UNCG is especially rich in the diversity of its arts pro- 
grams. Weatherspoon Art Museum, located in the Anne and 
Benjamin Cone Art Building, houses what is considered to be 
the most outstanding permanent collection of contemporary 
art in the Southeast and offers a showcase for student and fac- 
ulty work. University Dance programs provide performance 
and choreographic opportunities for qualified graduate and 
undergraduate students in dance. In music, student perform- 
ing organizations are open to all students by audition. 

A wide-ranging program in theatre has five production 
programs including the Workshop Theatre, Studio Theatre, 
UNCG Theatre, the North Carolina Theatre for Young People, 
and the Summer Theatre Program. A student-managed cam- 
pus radio station, WUAG, is housed in Taylor Building. The 
University Concert and Lecture Series brings exciting and 
innovative programs in the performing arts to the campus. 

The many opportunities and services for students, 
including Residence Life, are described in The University 
Community. 

Student Health Services provides full-time medical ser- 
vices, while the Counseling and Testing Center offers per- 
sonal counseling, psychotherapy, and outreach programs to 
assist students with their adjustment to college. 

The Career Services Center assists students in plan- 
ning their careers and securing full-time employment after 
graduation. 

The Elliott University Center (EUC) provides space for 
student government, student publications, and many student 
organizations, as well as offering a food court, study rooms, 
meditation space, game room, movies, concerts, lectures, 
dances, and parties. The offices of Adult Students, Career Ser- 
vices, Disability Services, Multicultural Affairs, Orientation 
and Family Programs, and Campus Activities and Programs 
are located in EUC. 

The Student Plaza and Fountain, situated in the middle 
of the campus, is a popular location for outdoor events and 
informal gatherings. 

There are close to two hundred affiliated clubs and 
organizations at UNCG, including honor societies, national 
societies, service organizations, departmental, professional, 
religious, and general groups, musical, media organizations, 
and sports clubs. UNCG is one of only six higher educational 
institutions in North Carolina approved to have a chapter of 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

Several Greek fraternities and sororities have chapters on 
campus and offer a channel for social growth. See chapter 8, 
"The University Community." 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Introduction 



UNCG has a sixteen-team intercollegiate athletics pro- 
gram and competes in the Southern Conference. A wide 
choice of intramural sports and club sports is also offered on 
campus. 

The well-equipped recreation center offers a full range 
of recreational services to the campus, including an indoor 
climbing wall. 

The UNCG campus is located near the center of Greens- 
boro, the state's third largest city. Greensboro has a popula- 
tion of 237,316, while the greater Triad area has a population 
approaching 1,502,100. Located midway between Washing- 
ton and Atlanta, Greensboro is less than two hours from the 
Blue Ridge mountains, about three hours from the Atlantic 
coast, and is served by Piedmont Triad International Airport. 
Greensboro is a dynamic city, offering a splendid setting for 
a university. In return, for more than a century, UNCG has 
enriched Greensboro with its widely diversified academic 
community. 



A global university integrating intercultural and 
international experiences and perspectives into learning, 
discovery, and service. 



Accreditation 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is accred- 
ited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, 
Georgia, 30033-4007; telephone 404/679-4501) to award Bach- 
elor's, Master's, Specialist's, and Doctor's degrees. 

Teacher Education programs have been approved at 
the state level by the North Carolina Department of Public 
Instruction and at the national level by the National Council 
of Accreditation in Teacher Education. 

Programs in the professional schools and in certain 
departments of the College of Arts and Sciences are also 
accredited by relevant professional agencies. Where appli- 
cable, such accreditation is noted in the respective sections in 
Academic Units and alphabetical departmental listings. 

The Mission of The University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Approved by Chancellor Brady, December 15, 2008 
Endorsed by the Board of Trustees, February 19, 2009 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is . . . 

A learner-centered, accessible, and inclusive community 
fostering intellectual inquiry to prepare students for mean- 
ingful lives and engaged citizenship; 

A research university where collaborative scholarship and 
creative activity enhance quality of life across the lifespan; 

A source of innovation and leadership meeting social, 
economic, and environmental challenges in the Piedmont 
Triad, North Carolina, and beyond; and 



The Vision Statement of 

The University of North Carolina at 

Greensboro 

Approved by Chancellor Brady, December 15, 2008 
Endorsed by the Board of Trustees, February 19, 2009 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro will 
redefine the public research university for the 21st century as 
an inclusive, collaborative, and responsive institution making 
a difference in the lives of students and the communities it 
serves. 

UNCG's Vision for Teaching and 
Learning 

UNCG embraces student learning as its highest priority 
and provides exemplary learning environments. The Uni- 
versity establishes a diverse community of learning in which 
individual differences are valued and interactions are encour- 
aged in an atmosphere of mutual respect. 

The faculty are committed to introducing students to the 
most important knowledge and research in their disciplines, 
fostering intellectual depth and breadth, and opening stu- 
dents to new possibilities for understanding themselves and 
the world. The faculty employ the growing body of knowl- 
edge about learning and work continually to evaluate and 
improve their teaching methods and materials. UNCG views 
learning as a shared responsibility, and accordingly, 

• maintains clear, high, and consistent learning goals, 

• provides a variety of opportunities which foster 
intellectual growth, 

• empowers individuals to take responsibility for their 
own learning, 

• recognizes and supports diverse learning styles and 
levels of development, 

• incorporates appropriate informational and instruc- 
tional technologies, 

• encourages the integration of knowledge across disci- 
plines, and 

• utilizes assessment, evaluation, and feedback to 
improve teaching and learning. 

UNCG expects all students to communicate clearly and 
to make effective use of technology appropriate to their stud- 
ies. Students are encouraged to be actively engaged in their 
education. UNCG graduates should be ready to continue as 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 






Introduction 



lifelong learners and to face the challenges that will confront All employees of the University are expected to support 

them as responsible citizens of the state, the nation and the the principle of and contribute to the realization of equal 
world. employment opportunity. Affirmative action is a priority con- 



Affirmative Action Program 

The Code adopted by the Board of Governors of The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina affirms the following statement: 

Admission to, employment by, and promotion in 
The University of North Carolina and all of its con- 
stituent institutions shall be on the basis of merit, 
and there shall be no discrimination against any per- 
son on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, 
national origin, age, or disability, or because of the 
person's honorable service in the armed services of 
the United States. (Chapter 1, Section 103) 

At The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, the 
following statement has been formulated to express the com- 
mitment to Affirmative Action: 

In addition to adherence to the UNCG Policy 
on Discriminatory Conduct, the University aims to 
achieve within all areas of employment a diverse 
faculty and staff capable of providing for excellence 
in the education of its students and for the enrich- 
ment of the total University community. In seeking 
to fill openings, every effort will be made to recruit 
in such a way that women, minorities, disabled per- 
sons, and veterans will have an equal opportunity to 
be considered for and appointed to all vacant posi- 
tions. All appointments, promotions, and all other 
personnel actions, such as compensation, benefits, 
transfers, training and educational programs, tuition 
assistance, travel assistance, research grants, sup- 
port for graduate assistants, social and recreational 
programs, will be administered without regard to 
race, color, creed, religion, gender, national origin, 
age, political affiliation, sexual orientation, or dis- 
abling condition in such manner as is consistent with 
achieving a staff of diverse and competent persons. 

Overall responsibility for the development and 
implementation of the University's Affirmative 
Action Plan resides with the Chancellor. The Affir- 
mative Action Committee and the Affirmative Action 
Office have been given the responsibility to moni- 
tor the effectiveness of the University's Affirmative 
Action Program and to assist in affirmative action 
policy and planning. This does not diminish in any 
way the responsibilities of deans, department heads, 
managers, and supervisors to assist in administering 
the affirmative action policy and planning through 
promulgation of information. 

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
reaffirms its commitment to equality of opportunity 
in its relationships with all members of the Univer- 
sity community. 



cern in all facets of operation. 



1Q 2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



2. Admission to the University 

complete admission information: Undergraduate Admissions www.uncg.edu/adm 
transfer credit evaluation: University Registrar's Office www.uncg.edu/reg 
residency status for tuition purposes: Provost's Office http://provost.uncg.edu/res 

UNCG seeks men and women with ability, character, For traditional freshman and transfer applicants, inter- 
motivation, and the intellectual potential to meet UNCG stan- views are not used as criteria for admission. Individual 
dards of performance. UNCG's admission decision is based appointments for information purposes may be arranged by 
upon an evaluation of the applicant's secondary school record contacting the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 336/334- 
and/or college record, including the overall grade point aver- 5243, in advance of the date a campus visit is planned, 
age and SAT or ACT scores. These factors are used to deter- Adult students who do not meet regular admission 
mine the applicant's probability of success at UNCG. requirements may be considered for admission through the 

This policy applies to the admission of freshmen and Office of Undergraduate Admissions (see below), 
transfer students. The University of North Carolina at Greens- Overenrollment or state budgetary constraints may 

boro is fully committed to equality of educational opportu- require the restriction of admission during a given year or the 

nity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, adjustment of minimum requirements or application dead- 

or employees based on race, color, national origin, religion, lines. Visit the Web site at www.uncg.edu/adm or call the 

sex, age, or disability. This commitment is in keeping with Undergraduate Admissions Office, Armfield-Preyer Admis- 

Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 and Section s ions & Visitor Center, 336/334-5243, for complete admissions 

504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the ADA of 1990, and other information, 
applicable federal and state laws. The Affirmative Action 
Officer, UNCG, PO Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170, 
(336/334-5009), is responsible for coordinating compliance 
and investigating complaints. 

FrpQhmpn Secondary School Preparation 

Candidates for admission to the freshman class must 

A freshman is defined as a student who is a high school submit a secondary school diploma (or its equivalent) and 

graduate and who has not attended college after graduating at least 15 acceptable units of credit from an accredited sec- 

from high school. Admission into the freshman class implies ondary school. (A unit is defined as credit given for a course 

that the student will eventually become a candidate for a which meets for one period daily during the entire school year 

bachelor's degree. A student who has college credit totaling or its equivalent.) Students must present the units described 

fewer than 30 semester hours from a regionally accredited at the bottom of this page. 

institution is designated as a "freshman-transfer" and must It is reC ommended that prospective students take one 

meet requirements under both transfer and freshman admis- foreign language unit and one mathematics unit in the twelfth 

sions programs. grade. 

Required Secondary School Units (minimum course requirements)* 

English (emphasizing grammar, composition, and literature) 4 

Foreign Language (two units of one foreign language) 2 

Mathematics (Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, one advanced course beyond Algebra II**) 4 

Science (including at least 1 unit in life or biological science, at least 

1 unit in physical science, at least 1 laboratory course) 3 

Social Science (1 unit in US history; 1 unit in history, economics, 

sociology, or civics) 2 

Total required units 15 

*These required units vary per high school graduation year. Please contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for details. 
**Please contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions for an approved list of courses that satisfy the fourth mathematics requirement. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



II 



Admissions 



Application Procedures for Freshmen 

1 . Complete the UNCG application forms. A $45 applica- 
tion fee must accompany the application. This fee covers 
the cost of processing the application and is subject to 
change; it is not refundable and is not applicable toward 
tuition or other costs. 

The application deadline for freshman admission is 
March 1. Applications received after that date will be 
considered on a space available basis. 

2. Submit an official transcript of secondary school work. 
Applicants must request that their school counselors 
forward their transcripts, including courses in progress, 
weighted cumulative grade point average on a 4.0 scale, 
and rank in class, directly to the Office of Undergradu- 
ate Admissions. Students currently enrolled in second- 
ary school should request that the courses in progress 
and cumulative grade point average be listed on the 
transcripts. 

3. Take the SAT administered by The College Board or 
the ACT Assessment with the Writing Test option. If 
possible, this test should be taken in the spring of the 
junior year and in the fall of the senior year of second- 
ary school. It is recommended that test scores be sent 
directly from The College Board or from the ACT 
Assessment Program to the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions. 

4. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions reserves 
the right to request additional information regarding 
an applicant's activities and responses to questions 
required by the UNC system. If additional information 
cannot be collected prior to the above deadlines, the 
application may be deferred to another term. For this 
reason, we encourage applicants to submit all required 
materials well in advance of the posted deadline. 

For information about the SAT, visit the ETS Web site at 
www.ets.org. You may also write or call The College Board 
SAT Program, Princeton, NJ 08541, 609/771-7600. UNCG's 
College Board code number is 5913. For information about 
the ACT, you may visit the ACT Web site at www.act.org. You 
may also write or call ACT, P.O. Box 168, Iowa City, I A 52243, 
319/337-1000. UNCG's ACT code number is 3166. 

Early Graduates 

Students who plan to complete high school in fewer than 
four years with the intention of enrolling at UNCG are con- 
sidered on a case by case basis. To determine if you are eli- 
gible to enroll as an early high school graduate, please contact 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at 336/334-5243. In 
addition, early high school graduates must meet the follow- 
ing criteria to be considered for admission: 

• Submit the UNCG application forms and applica- 
tion fee prior to the deadline. 

• Submit a final high school transcript with an official 
graduation date that is prior to the intended enroll- 
ment date at UNCG. 

• Satisfy the minimum course requirements prior to 
graduation. 

• Submit official SAT or ACT scores. 

Please note that students who enroll as early graduates 
are not eligible for the merit award scholarship program. 



Transfer Students 

Well-qualified students with 30 transferable semester 
hours or more of college credit from a regionally accredited 
institution are encouraged to transfer to UNCG to continue 
their studies. A student who has college credit totaling fewer 
than 30 hours from a regionally accredited institution is des- 
ignated a "freshman-transfer" and must meet requirements 
under both transfer and freshman admissions programs. 

Requirements and Procedures 

For consideration as a transfer, students must have at 
least a 2.0 or higher grade point average on a 4.0 scale on all 
previous work attempted and on all transferable course work 
from a regionally accredited college or university. Grade 
point averages are recalculated to determine admissibility. 
Transfer students must be in good standing and eligible to 
return to their last attended undergraduate institution. Trans- 
fer students should be in good standing and eligible to return 
to their last attended graduate or professional institution. 

For transfer students, the priority deadline for submitting 
the application is March 1 for fall and October 1 for the spring 
semester. Final deadlines for transfer applicants are August 1 
for fall and December 1 for spring (space permitting). 

Transfer students are required to submit by the above 
deadlines: 

1. UNCG application forms showing true and com- 
plete information. 

2. Official transcript from the secondary school 
attended. Transfer students must present 15 accept- 
able units of credit from an accredited secondary 
school. See specific course units listed in "Fresh- 
men" section. 

3. Official transcripts from each postsecondary institu- 
tion previously attended (including summer school 
and extension). 

4. A list of courses in progress including course num- 
ber, course name, and semester/quarter hours of 
credit. 

5. An application fee, currently $45, not refundable 
and not applicable toward tuition and other costs. 

After receipt of the above credentials, the UNCG admis- 
sions staff reviews the application to determine admissibility. 
The Office of Undergraduate Admissions reserves the right to 
request additional information regarding an applicant's activ- 
ities and responses to questions required by the UNC system. 
If additional information cannot be collected prior to the 
above deadlines, the application may be deferred to another 
term. For this reason, we encourage applicants to submit all 
required materials well in advance of the posted deadline. 

The number of semester hours of credit for previous 
college-level work that can be transferred to UNCG will be 
determined by the University Registrar after formal admis- 
sion. Transfer credit to be awarded is determined by the qual- 
ity as well as the quantity of the student's previous college 
work. Course work completed with a grade of C-, D+, D, or D- 
will not transfer. Transfer courses are evaluated on a course- 
by-course basis. 



12 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Admissions 



2Plus Students 

The 2Plus program is for those community college gradu- 
ates who hold a specific Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) 
degree or Associate Degree in Nursing (A.D.N.) and desire to 
transfer into UNCG with advanced standing, pursuing a spe- 
cific UNCG major. Articulation notices are sent to most North 
Carolina community colleges listing the 2Plus admission 
requirements. Specific details of each notice may be obtained 
from the UNCG Undergraduate Admissions Office or the 
community college involved. Out-of-state A.A.S./A.D.N. 
degrees may also be approved to transfer under the 2Plus 
program by the corresponding UNCG academic department. 

2Plus Articulation students are transfer students with 
several unique requirements and procedures. All details gov- 
erning their enrollment are provided for in the articulation 
notices. The decision for admission is based on successful 
completion of the A.A.S./A.D.N. degree, and other specific 
factors outlined in the 2Plus articulation notice. These appli- 
cants must complete all procedures listed under Transfer 
Students except for #2 and apply through the Undergraduate 
Admissions Office. 

2Plus students must meet the grade point average 
requirements of the UNCG School of their major as desig- 
nated in the articulation notice. 

No combination of 2Plus and community college transfer 
credit may exceed 64 hours on the student's transfer equiva- 
lency worksheet. 

Please visit the 2Plus Web site (web.uncg.edu/adm/ 
2plus) for more details about 2Plus admission requirements. 



Admissions Decision 

After all required information is received by the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions, applicants are notified by letter 
of their acceptance, rejection, or other action taken on their 
applications. International applicants are notified of decisions 
by the International Programs Center. 

Confirmation of Intent to Enroll 

Students admitted before April 1 for the fall semester 
must confirm their intention to enroll by May 1 by confirming 
online at http://web.uncg.edu/adm/steps. Students admitted 
after April 1 for the fall semester and all students admitted 
for the spring semester must confirm their attendance online 
within four (4) weeks from the date on their letter of admis- 
sion. If a student does not confirm intent to enroll, the stu- 
dent's application is subject to cancellation. Students must 
also submit a completed immunization form prior to enroll- 
ing. 

Students with International 
Credentials 

For the purpose of admission, UNCG defines an "inter- 
national student" applicant as a foreign national who holds, 
or who intends to hold, a temporary, non-immigrant visa/ 
status in the U.S.A. International students apply through the 
International Programs Center. For additional information 
please contact the Director of International Admissions at 
336/334-5404. 



Applicants who are U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, U.S. 
permanent residents, pending permanent residents, politi- 
cal asylees or refugees are considered as "domestic" appli- 
cants and should apply through the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions. For additional information please contact the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions at 336/334-5243. 

International athletic applicants must be approved for 
admission by both the International Programs Center and the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 

International Student Admissions 

International students may apply to UNCG for the fall 
(August) or spring (January) semester. The fall semester dead- 
line for applicants who desire on-campus housing is April I, 
and June 1 for students not needing on-campus housing. The 
deadline for the spring semester is October 1 . Applicants may 
download a printable version of the International Admission 
Application Form from www.uncg.edu/ipg/intlundertradap- 
pforms or send an e-mail request to ipc_adm(« l uncg.edu. 

Admission is based on courses taken, grades achieved in 
secondary and post-secondary institutions, and English pro- 
ficiency test results. International athletes must also submit 
SAT results. 

A. First-Time Freshman International Admissions 
Criteria 

International applicants to UNCG are required to submit 
the following: 

• Complete International Admission Application. 

Undergraduate International Admission Application 
Form is available for download at http://www.uncg.edu/ 
ipg/intlundergradappforms or e-mail ipc_adm@uncg. 
edu. Please read instructions carefully and complete all 
appropriate sections. 

• A $45.00 (U.S. currency) non-refundable processing fee 
payable to UNCG must accompany your application. 

• Results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) or other acceptable test (see below for list 
of tests). Scores must be sent directly to UNCG from 
testing agency. Required for applicants whose native 
language is not English. 

• Original or certified copies of all OFFICIAL secondary 
records including certificates, degrees, or diplomas in 
original language of issue. Do not fax academic records. 
Applicants who have studied in the U.S. are required to 
have the institution(s) in the U.S. send the transcript(s) 
directly to UNCG. 

• Official English translations of all academic records 
including certificates, degrees, or diplomas. Send OFFI- 
CIAL transcript(s) directly to UNCG. 

English Language Proficiency 

Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to prove English proficiency by one of the following 
means: 

• TOEFL— Test of English as a Foreign Language with a 
minimum Paper-Based score of 550 or a minimum Inter- 
net Based score of 79. 

• IELTS— International English Language Test System 
with a score of 6.5 or higher. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



13 



Admissions 



• MELAB (Michigan English Language Battery) test result 
of 80 or higher. 

• SAT— Scholastic Aptitude Test with a Critical Reading 
(verbal) score of 400 or higher. 

• Successful completion of a college transferable English 
course (minimum requirement: grade of C or better). 
Must be taken at a regionally-accredited U.S. college. 

• Successful completion of the INTERLINK Language 
Program at UNCG. 

UNCG Intensive English Language and Conditional 
Admissions 

An intensive English program is offered through the 
INTERLINK Language Center. IPC works closely with 
INTERLINK to offer conditional admission to academically 
eligible students who first will attend INTERLINK. Students 
who successfully complete all INTERLINK levels, or achieve 
an acceptable English language proficiency test score, are eli- 
gible to apply for full admission to the university. 

B. Transfer Student International Admissions 
Criteria 

Transfer applicants must request official transcripts from 
high school and each post-secondary institution attended. 
International and U.S. transcripts and the official translations 
must be sent to the Office of International Programs. 

You are required to submit all transfer records whether 
or not you wish to receive credit. Concealing attendance at an 
educational institution is considered an offense by the Uni- 
versity and can be grounds for academic dismissal. 

International transfer applicants to UNCG are required 
to submit the following: 

• Complete International Admission Application. 
Undergraduate International Admission Application 
Form is available for download at www.uncg.edu/ipg/ 
intlundergradappforms or e-mail ipc_adm@uncg.edu. 
Please read instructions carefully and complete all sec- 
tions. 

• A $45.00 (U.S. currency) non-refundable processing fee 
payable to UNCG must accompany your application. 

• Results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) or other acceptable test (see below for list 
of tests). Scores must be sent directly to UNCG from 
testing agency. Required for applicants whose native 
language is not English. 

• Original or certified copies of all OFFICIAL second- 
ary and post-secondary records including certificates, 
degrees, or diplomas in original language of issue. Do 
not fax academic records. Applicants who have studied 
in the U.S. are required to have the institution(s) in the 
U.S. send the transcript(s) directly to UNCG. 

• Official English translations of all academic records 
including certificates, degrees, or diplomas. Do not fax 
translations. Send OFFICIAL transcript(s) directly to 
UNCG. 

English Language Proficiency 

Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to prove English proficiency by one of the following 
means: 



• TOEFL— Test of English as a Foreign Language with a 
minimum Paper-Based score of 550 or a minimum Inter- 
net Based score of 79. 

• IELTS— International English Language Test System 
with a score of 6.5 or higher. 

• MELAB (Michigan English Language Battery) test result 
of 80 or higher. 

• SAT— Scholastic Aptitude Test with a verbal score of 400 
or higher. 

• Successful completion of a college transferable English 
course (minimum requirement: grade of C or better). 
Must be taken at a regionally-accredited U.S. college. 

• Successful completion of the INTERLINK Language 
Program at UNCG 

Please have all scores sent to UNCG directly from testing 
agency. 

UNCG Intensive English Language and Conditional 
Admissions 

An intensive English program is offered through the 
INTERLINK Language Center. IPC works closely with 
INTERLINK to offer conditional admission to academically 
eligible students who first will attend INTERLINK. Students 
who successfully complete all INTERLINK levels, or achieve 
an acceptable English language proficiency test score, are eli- 
gible to apply for full admission to the university. 

C. Second-degree International Admissions 
Criteria 

Applicants must submit official transcripts from all col- 
leges/universities attended, in the native language with offi- 
cial English translations. Review of the college/university 
transcripts will determine second-degree eligibility. Other 
requirements and procedures are the same as for Interna- 
tional Transfer Students. 

NOTE: Students who have taken advanced examinations 
in high school, such as British A-levels, the German Arbitur, 
or the French Baccalaureate, etc., may be eligible to receive 
university course credits. Please contact IPC for details. Stu- 
dents who have taken the International Baccalaureate Higher 
Level Examinations may also be awarded university course 
credits. IB test scores must be sent to UNCG to assign the 
appropriate number of credit hours. 



Domestic Applicants 

with International Credentials 

Application Procedures for Domestic Freshmen with 
any International Credentials 

1. Complete the UNCG application forms. A $45 applica- 
tion fee must accompany the application. This fee covers 
the cost of processing the application and is subject to 
change; it is not refundable and is not applicable toward 
tuition or other costs. The application deadline is March 
1. Applications received after that date will be consid- 
ered on a space available basis. 

2. Submit original or certified copies of all official second- 
ary records including certificates, degrees, or diplomas 
in original language of issue. Official records must be 
sent directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 



14 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Admissions 



Applicants who have studied in the U.S. must request 
that their school counselors forward their transcripts 
directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 
3. Students with any international credentials must submit 
transcript evaluations from a company recognized by 
NACES or from AACRAO by the March 1 deadline in 
order for an admission decision to be made. Please visit 
www.naces.org or www.aacrao.org to obtain a list of 
qualified evaluation services. 

English Language Proficiency 

Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to prove English proficiency by one of the following 
means: 

TOEFL— Test of English as a Foreign Language with a 

minimum Paper-Based score of 550 or a minimum Inter- 
net Based score of 79. 

IELTS— International English Language Test System 

with a score of 6.5 or higher. 

MELAB (Michigan English Language Battery) test result 

of 80 or higher. 

SAT— Scholastic Aptitude Test with a verbal score of 400 

or higher. 

Successful completion of a college transferable English 

course (minimum requirement: grade of C or better). 

Successful completion of the INTERLINK Language 

Program at UNCG. 

Please have all scores sent to UNCG directly from the 
testing agency. 

Application Procedures for Domestic Transfer Students 
with any International Credentials 

1. Complete the UNCG application forms. A $45 applica- 
tion fee must accompany the application. This fee covers 
the cost of processing the application and is subject 

to change; it is not refundable and is not applicable 
toward tuition or other costs. For transfer students, the 
priority deadline for submitting the application and all 
credentials is March 1 for fall and November 1 for the 
spring semester. Final deadlines for transfer applicants 
are August 1 for fall and December 1 for spring (space 
permitting). 

2. Submit original or certified copies of all official second- 
ary records including certificates, degrees, or diplomas 
in original language of issue. Official records must be 
sent directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 
Applicants who have studied in the U.S. must request 
that their high school counselors forward their tran- 
scripts directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admis- 
sions. 

3. Submit original or certified copies of all post-secondary 
records including certificates, degrees or diplomas in 
original language of issue. Official records must be sent 
directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 
Applicants who have studied in the U.S. are required 
to submit official transcripts from each postsecondary 
institution previously attended (including summer 
school and extension). Official transcripts must be sent 
directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 



4. All academic records obtained outside of the U.S. must 
be evaluated by a company recognized by NACES or 
by AACRAO prior to the application deadline in order 
for an admission decision to be made. Please visit www. 
naces.org or www.aacrao.com to obtain a list of quali- 
fied evaluation services. 

Course descriptions and/or course syllabi must be sub- 
mitted to the Transfer Articulation Division of the University 
Registrar's Office. Course descriptions and/or course syllabi 
must be in English and translated by an accredited transla- 
tion service. 

English Language Proficiency 

Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to prove English proficiency by one of the following 
means: 

TOEFL— Test of English as a Foreign Language with a 

minimum Paper-Based score of 550 or a minimum Inter- 
net Based score of 79. 

IELTS— International English Language Test System 

with a score of 6.5 or higher. 

MELAB (Michigan English Language Battery) test result 

of 80 or higher. 

SAT— Scholastic Aptitude Test with a verbal score of 400 

or higher. 

Successful completion of a college transferable English 

course (minimum requirement: grade of C or better). 

Successful completion of the INTERLINK Language 

Program at UNCG. 

Please have all scores sent to UNCG directly from the 
testing agency. 



Visiting Students 

College Level 

College level visitors may apply through the Division of 
Continual Learning. See http://web.uncg.edu/dcl/web. 

High School Level 

High school seniors with superior academic credentials 
may want to supplement their high school curriculum with 
courses at UNCG. To determine if you are eligible to enroll 
as a visiting student, contact the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions at 336/334-5243. Admission as a visiting student 
does not imply regular admission to UNCG. 

In addition, visiting high school applicants must: 

• Submit the UNCG application forms and the application 
fee. 

• Have a letter of permission from parent(s) and from the 
high school principal sent directly to the UNCG Office 
of Undergraduate Admissions. The letter must include 
permission to take a specific UNCG course. 

• Request that an official high school transcript and SAT 
or ACT scores be sent to the UNCG Office of Under- 
graduate Admissions. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



15 



Admissions 



Adult Students 

UNCG encourages qualified adult students to complete 
their undergraduate degrees. 

Persons who have been away from formal schooling for 
at least twelve (12) consecutive months at any time may apply 
for consideration as freshman or transfer students, even 
though they may not meet traditional admission require- 
ments. They must have completed high school, an adult high 
school diploma, or earned a GED. If they are under 24 years 
of age, they must have fulfilled the UNC-System Minimum 
High School Course Requirements listed at the beginning of 
this chapter or a required sequence of college transfer course 
work to be eligible for consideration. Some adult students 
may be admitted for full-time course work, some may have 
their hours limited to promote academic success, and some 
may be advised first to complete preparatory course work 
elsewhere. An interview with an Admissions advisor may be 
required. 

Priority consideration applications for nontraditional 
adult students (including all required credentials) are due 
by March 1 for the fall semester or October 1 for the spring 
semester. The final application deadlines are August 1 (space 
permitting) for the fall semester or December 1 (space permit- 
ting) for the spring semester. 

1. Complete the UNCG application form and return it to 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions with the appli- 
cation fee no later than August 1 for fall or December 1 
for spring. 

2. Submit official transcripts for the secondary school 
attended (and GED scores or adult high school diploma, 
if applicable) and from any post-secondary institution(s) 
attended, even those granting summer, extension, devel- 
opmental, and technical credit. 

Applicants will be notified of a decision as soon as pos- 
sible. Admitted students should confirm their intention to 
enroll by confirming online at http://web.uncg.edu/adm/steps 
within four weeks from the date of acceptance if possible. 
Confirmation of late acceptance must be made by the regis- 
tration deadline. Before enrolling, students must submit an 
immunization form (found in the UNCG Enrollment Hand- 
book or on the Web site listed above) to the UNCG Student 
Health Services in Gove Student Health Center. 



Former UNCG Students 

All UNCG students who leave UNCG at any time other 
than summer must reapply for admission. Students should 
contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 336/334- 
5243, to obtain information and an admissions application. 
Former students should follow one of the procedures out- 
lined below: 

• Former UNCG students who have not attended any 
other post-secondary institution since leaving UNCG 
are eligible to apply for readmission to the University 
up to five business days before the first day of classes 
for the semester. 

• Former UNCG students who have attended another 
post-secondary institution since leaving the University 
are required to apply for readmission to the University 
(no later than December 1 for the spring term, August 



1 for the fall term, or May 1 for summer). They are 
further required to submit official transcripts from all 
schools attended since leaving UNCG to the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions. 

• All students must have, as a minimum, an overall and 
transferable 2.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale as calculated by 
UNCG on all courses taken since leaving the University. 

• Formerly suspended students who wish to return must 
agree to participate in a program sponsored by Student 
Academic Services during their first semester upon 
return. Failure to meet the conditions of this program 
will result in immediate dismissal from the term. For- 
merly suspended students will be notified of the details 
of this program by Student Academic Services. 

• Former UNCG students who left on academic dis- 
missal, must also petition Student Academic Services to 
return. Formerly dismissed students who successfully 
petition to return must agree to participate in a program 
sponsored by Student Academic Services during their 
first semester upon return. Failure to meet the condi- 
tions of this program will result in immediate dismissal 
from the term. Formerly dismissed students who are 
readmitted will be notified about the details of this pro- 
gram when their appeal is approved. 

The Office of Undergraduate Admissions reserves the 
right to request additional information regarding an appli- 
cant's activities and responses to questions required by the 
UNC system. If additional information cannot be collected 
prior to the above deadlines, the application may be deferred 
to another term. For this reason, we encourage applicants to 
submit all required materials well in advance of the posted 
deadline. 

Second Baccalaureate Degree 
Students 

An applicant who holds a baccalaureate degree from 
a regionally accredited institution and who wishes to take 
undergraduate work toward a second baccalaureate degree 
in a different field should follow the instructions below: 

1. Complete the application form and return it to the 
Undergraduate Admissions Office with the applica- 
tion fee. Priority consideration applications (includ- 
ing all required credentials) are due by March 1 for 
the fall semester or October 1 for the spring semes- 
ter. The final application deadlines are August 1 
(space permitting) for the fall semester or December 
1 (space permitting) for the spring semester. 

2. Submit official transcripts from each postsecondary 
institution previously attended (including summer 
school and extension) by the above deadlines. 

3. An application fee, currently $45, not refundable 
and not applicable toward tuition and other costs. 

4. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions reserves 
the right to request additional information regard- 
ing an applicant's activities and responses to 
questions required by the UNC system. If addi- 
tional information cannot be collected prior to the 
above deadlines, the application may be deferred 



16 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Admissions 



to another term. For this reason, we encourage 
applicants to submit all required materials well in 
advance of the posted deadline. 
An applicant holding a baccalaureate degree and taking 
work for credit for other purposes must apply through The 
Graduate School. 

Exception I: second-degree applicants to Preprofessional 
Programs, including the Pre-Medical Program, should apply 
through the Undergraduate Admissions Office. 

Exception II: All students seeking Standard Professional 
I Licensure in the same major as their degree should contact 
the UNCG Teachers Academy at 336/334-3412. 

Non-Degree Seeking Students 

Non-degree seeking registration for unrestricted courses 
is available at the beginning of each semester for undergrad- 
uate-level adults who wish to take a course(s) for personal 
enrichment or professional development through the Divi- 
sion of Continual Learning. The non-degree seeking regis- 
tration process is not intended for UNCG students who are 
already admitted to degree programs or who are returning 
to UNCG. 

Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree must 
register through the Visions program. Please refer to The 
Graduate School Bulletin for information on the Visions pro- 
gram for visiting and non-degree seeking students. 

Non-degree seeking students are not eligible for any 
kind of University financial aid. Like all UNCG students, 
non-degree seeking students are subject to Immunization 
Clearance requirements (see below) and will be held to the 
same academic good standing policies (see chapter 4). 

Information about non-degree seeking registration may 
be obtained from the Division of Continual Learning (336/315- 
7044) or The Graduate School (336/334-5596) for Visions. 

Registering for courses as a non-degree seeking stu- 
dent does not constitute admission to UNCG or any of its 
programs. Students seeking admission to a degree program 
should file a formal application through the Undergraduate 
Admissions Office or The Graduate School. 

Part-Time Degree Students 

Students who plan to enroll on a part-time basis, but 
who wish to work toward a degree, are considered "part-time 
degree students" and should follow the standard admissions 
procedures. Part-time students are those who enroll in fewer 
than 12 semester hours. Tuition and fees are determined by 
the number of hours taken and by in-state or out-of-state resi- 
dency (see chapter 3 for details). 

Additional College, School, 
& Departmental Requirements 
for All Applicants 

Schools, departments, and majors may have special 
admission and progression requirements in addition to Uni- 
versity admission requirements. Below is a summary of those 
programs which have additional requirements. See depart- 
mental listings for complete details. 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Biology majors: must maintain a 2.0 GPA in all biology 
courses taken at UNCG; teacher licensure in biology requires 
a 2.50 GPA in all biology courses taken at UNCG. 

Chemistry and Biochemistry majors: Only major 
requirement and related area requirement courses in which 
grades of C- or better are earned will be counted toward the 
major. Students must earn a C- or better in prerequisite major 
requirement and related area requirement courses before 
advancing to subsequent courses. 

Classical Studies majors: must have a 2.0 GPA or better 
in all courses in the major. Students pursuing Secondary Sub- 
ject Area Teacher Licensure in Latin must have a 2.50 overall 
GPA for admission to the Teachers Academy, and a minimum 
3.0 GPA in Latin courses. 

Communication Studies majors: must have grades of 
2.0 or better in all courses to be admitted to the major. 

English majors: must have grades of C- or better in all 
courses in the major. Admission to teacher education and stu- 
dent teaching in English requires a minimum GPA of 2.75. 

Geography majors: only grades of C- or higher will 
count toward completion of the major and concentrations. 

German majors: must maintain a GPA of 2.0 in all Ger- 
man courses. 

History majors: must maintain a cumulative 2.0 GPA in 
all history courses to qualify for a degree in History. 

Mathematics and Statistics majors: Students must have 
a minimum GPA of 2.0 in MAT/STA courses required for the 
major and completed at UNCG. 

Media Studies majors: to be admitted to the Media 
Studies major the student must have successfully completed 
ENG 101, MST 100, and MST 101 or 102 with grades of C or 
better and have an overall GPA of 2.20. 

Physics majors: must maintain a 2.0 GPA in all required 
physics and mathematics courses. 

Romance Languages majors: must have grades of C- or 
better in all courses in the major. Admission to teacher educa- 
tion and student teaching in French/Spanish requires a GPA 
of 2.75 overall and in the major. 

Sociology majors: All sociology majors must complete a 
minimum of 33 semester hours in sociology with at least a 2.0 
GPA in the major. 

Theatre majors: Drama majors (B.A. and B.F.A.) must 
have grades of C (2.0) or better in all courses in the major; 
Drama majors (B.F.A.) with a concentration in Theatre Educa- 
tion must have an overall GPA of 3.0. 

Bryan School of Business and Economics 

Enrollment in Bryan School Courses: Students must 
have a minimum overall 2.0 GPA to enroll in Bryan School 
courses. 

International Business Studies Program: requires a 2.50 
GPA for admission to and retention in the program. 

Other Bryan School Programs: A 2.0 GPA is required for 
admission to and retention in all other programs and majors 
in the Bryan School. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



17 



Admissions 



School of Education 

Elementary or Middle Grades Education majors: a GPA 

of 2.75 is required for admission to these teacher education 
programs. Transfer students planning to pursue those majors 
should contact the School of Education Student Information 
& Advising Office. 

Professions in Deafness majors: Teacher Education 
Preparation Concentration majors must have a GPA of 2.75 
for admission to the Teachers Academy. The Auditory-Oral/ 
B-K program requires an overall GPA of 2.70. The Interpreter 
Preparation concentration requires an overall GPA of 2.50 for 
admission. 

Special Education majors: must have an overall GPA of 
2.75. 

Admission to teacher education at the secondary level 
requires a minimum GPA of 2.50, except where higher GPA 
requirements are noted. Applications for admission should 
be filed in the Teachers Academy (319 Curry) during the sec- 
ond semester of the sophomore year. Transfer students must 
apply after they have completed 12 semester hours in resi- 
dency. 

School of Health and Human Performance 

Dance majors: admission to all majors is by applica- 
tion and audition only. B.S. in Dance Education majors must 
have a 2.50 GPA for admission to the Teachers Academy. 
B.F.A. Dance majors must maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 
or higher. 

Exercise and Sport Science majors: all majors must 
achieve a grade of C or better in all required ESS courses. 

Fitness Leadership: To apply for admission into the Fit- 
ness Leadership concentration, students must satisfactorily 
complete BIO 111, 271, 277, ESS 220, and one CHE course. 
Students may apply for admission into the concentration 
only while taking or after successfully completing ESS 375 
with a minimum grade of C. Transfer and second-degree stu- 
dents must complete the above requirements and successfully 
complete twelve (12) semester hours at UNCG before making 
application. Application does not guarantee admission. For 
complete information, see chapter 7. 

Physical Education Teacher Education: A 2.50 GPA is 
required for admission to the Teachers Academy. Admission 
to the Sports Medicine concentration requires a 3.0 GPA. 
Fitness Leadership, Aquatics Leadership, and Community 
Youth Sport Development concentrations require a 2.50 GPA 
before registering for the internship course. 

Health Education majors: must have a 2.50 cumulative 
GPA and at least a C in all health courses for admission into 
the professional program. 

Speech Pathology and Audiology majors: must have an 
overall GPA of 3.0. 

School of Human Environmental Sciences 

Consumer, Apparel, & Retail Studies majors: only 
grades of C (2.0) or higher in CARS courses will count toward 
completion of the CARS major and concentrations. An apparel 
product construction proficiency exam must be passed to 
enroll in the Apparel Product Design Studio courses, begin- 
ning with APD 250. 

Nutrition majors: must earn grades of C or better in all 
required NTR courses. 



Interior Architecture majors: admission is by personal 
interview or group orientation only. Transfers must have a 
2.50 GPA for admission. A GPA of 2.0 must be maintained to 
continue in the program. 

Human Development and Family Studies majors: 
requires a 2.50 GPA for admission to the department. Birth- 
Kindergarten majors must have a 2.70 GPA to be admitted to 
the Teachers Academy. 

Social Work majors: admission to the major is based 
upon satisfactory completion of SWK 215 with a GPA of C 
(2.0) or higher; a minimum University GPA of 2.50; comple- 
tion of a minimum of 51 semester hours; completion and sub- 
mission of the B.S.W. application packet by May 1 of the year 
in which the student is seeking admission. 

Lloyd International Honors College 

Admission to Lloyd International Honors College is 
required to enroll in Honors courses. New first-year students 
with at least a 3.80 high school GPA, or at least a 1200 SAT, 
may apply for admission on the International Honors Col- 
lege Web site (http://honorscollege.uncg.edu) or by contact- 
ing Lloyd International Honors College, 205 Foust Building, 
UNCG, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro NC 27402-6170. Continu- 
ing UNCG students must have at least a 3.30 GPA, and trans- 
fer students must have at least a 3.30 GPA from their former 
institution(s). 

School of Music 

All prospective music majors and minors must audi- 
tion for members of the music faculty for acceptance into 
the School of Music. Such auditions should be arranged in 
advance through the School of Music. Students should com- 
plete the online request for undergraduate audition at: 

www.uncg.edu/mus/audirionapplicationform.html. 

School of Nursing 

A minimum GPA of 3.0 or above is required for 
admission. Incoming transfer and second-degree students 
must have a transfer GPA of 3.0 or greater to declare Nursing 
as their major upon admission to the University. Students 
transferring into the pre-licensure program in the School of 
Nursing from another pre-licensure nursing program must 
have a letter of reference from the administrative head of 
that nursing program. This reference should be sent directly 
to the Dean of the School of Nursing. Students seeking an 
exception to the reference letter requirement may appeal to 
the Student Admission, Progression and Appeals Committee 
in the School of Nursing. Credits with a nursing designation 
do not transfer. The application deadline for upper division 
is February 1. 



Immunization Clearance 

Students who have been admitted to UNCG are required 
by North Carolina State law to submit an immunization form 
with appropriate verification of immunizations. This form is 
supplied by the admitting office and must be satisfactorily 
completed and returned to Gove Student Health Center. 

Failure to comply with this requirement within thirty 
calendar days from the first day of registration may result 
in the student's being administratively withdrawn from the 
University. 



18 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Admissions 



For detailed information see: http://studenthealth.uncg.edu/ 
policies/immunization 

Students subjected to an administrative withdrawal for 
failure to comply with medical clearance requirements are 
entitled to a refund, subject to the guidelines of the Univer- 
sity's Refund Policy. This policy is published in chapter 3 of 
this Bulletin. 



Entrance Deficiencies 

Entrance Deficiencies 

All deficiencies must be removed before graduation from 
the University. 

High School Subject Deficiencies 

Foreign Language 

A student who graduated from high school prior to 2004 
who is deficient in one or two foreign language units may be 
admitted. If admitted, the student must remove the deficiency 
prior to the completion of 60 semester hours or become ineli- 
gible to continue at UNCG until the deficiencies are removed. 
A student transferring to UNCG as a junior or senior must 
remove the deficiencies prior to completion of 30 hours or 
become ineligible to continue. 

Deficiencies can be removed by completing the appropri- 
ate college-level course in the area of the deficiency. Removal 
of a two-unit foreign language deficiency requires successful 
completion of two college-level courses in the same language. 
Removal of a one-unit language deficiency requires the suc- 
cessful completion of one college-level course at the 102 level. 
Students admitted with a one-unit deficiency in French or 
Spanish (and who wish to continue with the same language) 
must take the Language Placement Test to determine the level 
at which they will be allowed to begin their study of the lan- 
guage at UNCG. 

Students who graduate from high school and who are 
deficient in any high school unit must contact the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions regarding admissions require- 
ments. 

Appeal of Foreign Language Admission Deficiencies 

A student with circumstances that may interfere with his/ 
her ability to successfully remove foreign language admis- 
sion deficiencies by completing beginning-level foreign lan- 
guage courses (through the 102 level) may appeal to remove 
the deficiencies by completing alternate courses. A written 
appeal and any supporting documentation should be submit- 
ted to Student Academic Services. In such cases, after consul- 
tation with appropriate University faculty and staff, Student 
Academic Services may approve alternate foreign language 
courses that are translated into English or courses in the his- 
tory and traditions of non-English speaking cultures. 

Transfer Credit Regulations 

Accreditation 

UNCG accepts the accreditation of the Southern Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. 
Colleges and universities outside North Carolina must have 
accreditation from the appropriate regional accrediting 
agency for the transfer credit to be accepted. 



Nonaccredited Institutions 

Applicants from nonaccredited post-secondary institu- 
tions must meet the requirements in effect for admission to 
the freshman class, including satisfactory secondary school 
records and SAT scores, as well as meet the transfer require- 
ments of a 2.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale. 

Validating Examinations 

Some departments at UNCG require an examination to 
validate transfer credit. These examinations are administered 
by the department or school involved. 

Professional School Admissions 

Admission to the University does not constitute selection 
into any of the professional schools. 

Transfer Credit Articulation 

Located in the University Registrar's Office, this unit 
enters transfer credit course work into the student's official 
record. Also, in association with University faculty, this unit 
is responsible for determining how other higher education 
institution course work transfers into UNCG. Students with 
questions about transfer credit are encouraged to call the Uni- 
versity Registrar's Office and ask for the Transfer Articulation 
area (336/334-5946). Transfer equivalencies for courses taken 
in the North Carolina Community College System and many 
area universities are available on the Web at www.uncg.edu/ 
reg/transfer/index.html. 

Transfer Credit Limit 

The sum total of transfer credit from two-year college(s), 
that may be applied toward an undergraduate degree may 
not exceed 64 semester hours. 

Comprehensive Articulation Agreement 

The North Carolina General Assembly, the Board of 
Governors of The University of North Carolina, and the State 
Board of Community Colleges are committed to the simplifi- 
cation of transfer of credits for students and thus facilitating 
their educational progress as they pursue associate or bac- 
calaureate degrees within and among public post-secondary 
institutions in North Carolina. The Comprehensive Articula- 
tion Agreement (CAA) is a statewide agreement governing 
the transfer of credits between N.C. community colleges and 
public universities in North Carolina, and has as its objec- 
tive the smooth transfer of students, providing certain assur- 
ances to the transferring student by identifying community 
college courses that are appropriate for transfer as electives, 
and specifying courses that will satisfy pre-major and general 
education requirements. 

Based on initial transfer to UNCG, students who earn the 
A.A. or A.S. degree from a North Carolina community college 
and earned grades of C (2.0) or better will be eligible for 60 
semester hours of credit, junior standing, and will have met 
General Education Core (GEC) requirements. Students who 
complete the General Education transfer core (44 semester 
hours), but do not complete the A.A. or A.S. degree also will 
have met General Education Core (GEC) requirements. Stu- 
dents who earn D grades in the A.A. or A.S. program may 
or may not be admitted as juniors, but will not have GEC 
waived. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



19 



Admissions 



Extension Credit 

UNCG extension credit, earned either on or off campus, 
will be considered transfer credit for admission purposes. 
Up to 64 semester hours in extension and/or correspondence 
credits may be applied toward an undergraduate degree. Aca- 
demic departments may establish such course and credit limi- 
tations in acceptance of extension credit as may be required 
by specific degree programs. 

Although UNCG extension credit is treated as transfer 
credit at the time of admission, it will thereafter be considered 
"residence" credit for degree certification purposes. 

Correspondence Credit 

Up to 64 semester hours in correspondence and exten- 
sion credit may be applied to the completion of work for an 
undergraduate degree with the further stipulation that not 
more than one-fourth of the requirements for the degree may 
be completed in correspondence credit. Academic depart- 
ments may establish such course and credit limitations in 
acceptance of correspondence credit as may be required by 
specific degree programs. 

Although UNCG correspondence credit is treated as 
transfer credit at the time of admission, it will be thereafter 
considered "residence" credit for degree certification pur- 
poses. 

Correspondence credit earned from institutions other 
than UNCG is always treated as transfer credit. It will have 
no impact on the UNCG grade point average. Credit hours 
only will be applied toward the UNCG degree. 



Advanced Placement Exam, continued . 



Course Credit and 
Advanced Placement 

Advanced placement credit or exemption from specific 
degree requirements may be granted by UNCG. Students 
should contact their secondary school counselors regarding 
dates and local test centers. 

College Board Advanced Placement (AP) Program 

Secondary school students enrolled in AP courses may 
receive college credit by taking AP examinations upon com- 
pletion of the courses and forwarding the results to the Office 
of the University Registrar for evaluation. You may also visit 
the ETS Web site at www.ets.org. 

Advanced Placement Exam 



Exam 


Score 
Req 


Hours 
Granted 


Courses 


Art History 
Biology 
Biology 
Chemistry 


4 
3 

4 
3 


3* 
4 
8 
4 


ART elective 
BIO 105, 105L 

BIO 111, 112 
CHE 111, 112 


Chemistry 

Chinese Language & Culture 

Chinese Language & Culture 


4 
3 

4 


8 
3 
6 


CHE 111, 112, 114,115 

CHI 203 

CHI 203 & 204 


Computer Science AB 
Computer Science AB 


3 

4 


3 
6 


CSC 130 
CSC 130, 230 


Computer Science A 


4 


3 


CSC 130 


Economics — Macro 


4 


3 


ECO 202 


Economics — Micro 


4 


3 


ECO 201 


English — Lang & Comp 
English — Lang & Comp 
English — Lang & Comp 
English — Lit & Comp 


3 
4 
5 
3 


3 
6 
9 
3 


ENG 101 

ENG 101, 102 

ENG 101, 102, 104 

ENG 104 



Exam 


Score 
Req 


Hours 
Granted 


Courses 


English — Lit & Comp 


4 


6 


ENG 101, 104 


English — Lit & Comp 


5 


9 


(with WI") 

ENG 101, 102, 104 

(with WI**) 


Environmental Science 


3 


4 


BIO 105, 105L 


French Language 
French Language 
French Literature 


4 
3 

4 


6 
3 
6 


FRE 203, 204 

FRE 203 

FRE 301, FRE elective 


French Literature 


3 


- 


Exemption, no credit 


Geography, Human 
German Language 
German Language 
Gov & Politics: Amer. 


3 
4 
3 
3 


3 
6 
3 

3 


GEO 105 

GER203,204 

GER203 

PSC 100 


Gov & Politics: Comparatve 
History, European 
History, U.S. 
History, World 
Italian Language 
Italian Language 
Japanese Language & Culture 
Japanese Language & Culture 
Latin— Vergil 


3 
3 
3 

3 

4 
3 
3 
4 
3 


3 PSC 260 
6 HIS 222 & HIS elective 
6 HIS 211, 212 
6 HIS electives 
6 ITA 203, 204 
3 ITA 203 
3 JNS 203 
6 JNS 203 & 204 
3 LAT 203, 
after completion of LAT 204 
with C- or better 


Latin— Vergil 


4 


3 
after 
level LAT 


LAT 204, 
completion of advanced 
course with C- or better 


Latin Literature 


3 


3 LAT 203, 
after completion of LAT 204 
with C- or better 


Latin Literature 


4 


3 
after 
level LAT 


LAT 204, 
completion of advanced 
course with C- or better 


Mathematics— Calculus AB 


3 


3 


MAT 191 


Mathematics — Calculus AB 


4 


6 


MAT 191, 292 


Mathematics— Calculus BC 


3 


6 


MAT 191, 292 


Music— Aural 


4 


1 


MUS 105 


Music— Aural 


5 


2 


MUS 105, MUS 106 


Music — Nonaural 


4 


2 


MUS 101 


Music— Nonaural 


5 


4 


MUS 101, MUS 102 


Physics B 
Physics C 
Psychology 
Spanish Language 
Spanish Language 
Spanish Literature 


4 

4 

4 
3 
4 


8 
8 
3 
6 
3 

6 


PHY 211, 212 

PHY 291, 292 

PSY 121 

SPA 203, 204 

SPA 203 

SPA 351, SPA elective 


Spanish Literature 
Statistics 


3 
3 


3 


Exemption, no credit 
STA108 


Statistics 


5 


3 


STA271 


Studio Art: Gen Portfolio 


3 


2 


ART elective 


Studio Art: Drawing 


3 


2 


ART elective 



*Examination papers will be read by the department to determine exemption. 
**ENG 104 with Writing Intensive marker. 



20 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Admissions 



International Baccalaureate (IB) Program 

Listed below is the credit associated with scores on the 
International Baccalaureate Higher Level Examinations. The 
University Registrar at UNCG receives the IB scores and 
assigns the appropriate credit hours. Students should request 
that their test scores be sent to UNCG. Students will be noti- 
fied in writing of the credit they receive. You may also visit 
the IB Web site at www.ibo.org or call 212/889-9242. Scores 
must be requested in written form by contacting International 
Baccalaureate of North America, 200 Madison Avenue, New 
York, NY 20016. 

International Baccalaureate IB Exams 

Hours 

Awarded Courses 

8 BIO 111 & 112 

8 CHE 111/112 and 
CHE 114/115 

6 ENG 101 & 104 

9* ENG 101 & 104* 

6 FRE 203 & 204 

6 FRE 204 & 301 

6 FRE 203 & 204 

6 FRE 204 & 301 

6 FRE 203 & 204 

6 FRE 204 & 301 

6 FRE 203 & 204 

6 FRE 204 & 301 

9 GER203&204 
& GER 301 

6 GER 203 & 204 

6 HIS 217, 218 

6 JNS 203 & 204 

Contact Mathematics & 
Statistics Department 
8 PHY 211, 212 

6 ATY 213 

& elective ATY credit 
3 PSY 121 

6 SPA 203 & 204 

6 SPA 204 & 301 

6 SPA 203 & 204 

6 SPA 204 & 301 

6 SPA 203 & 204 

6 SPA 204 & 301 

6 SPA 203 & 204 

6 SPA 204 & 301 

*Contact Director of Undergraduate Studies in English for an additional Eng- 
lish course at the 200 level to be awarded in consultation with the department. 

College Board SAT: Writing Exam 

Exemption from ENG 101 will be based on a score of 650 
or above on the SAT Writing Exam. 

College Board SAT: Subject Tests 

Those who have strong academic preparation are encour- 
aged to take one or more of the exams listed below. Examina- 
tion dates are available in secondary school counseling cen- 
ters or by writing to College Board SAT Program, Princeton, 
NJ 08541, phone number 609/771-7600. You may also visit the 
ETS Web site at www.ets.org. 



College Board SAT: Subject Tests 



Original Recentered Hours 



Min 
Exam Score 

IB Biology — Higher level 5 

IB Chemistry— Higher level 5 

IB English Al 4, 5 

IB English Al 6,7 
IB French Al —Higher level 5 

IB French Al - Higher level 6, 7 
IB French Al —Standard level 6 
IB French Al —Standard level 7 
IB French B— Higher level 5 

IB French B — Higher level 6, 7 
IB French B— Standard level 6 
IB French B— Standard level 7 
IB German Al 5 

IB German B 5 

IB History 5 

IB Japanese 6, 7 
AB — Standard Level 
IB Mathematics 5 

IB Physics 5 

IB Social Anthropology 5 

IB Psychology 4 

IB Spanish Al — Higher level 5 

IB Spanish Al - Higher level 6, 7 
IB Spanish Al —Standard level 6 
IB Spanish Al —Standard level 7 
IB Spanish B— Higher level 5 

IB Spanish B - Higher level 6, 7 
IB Spanish B— Standard level 6 
IB Spanish B— Standard level 7 



Exam 

American History 
American History 



English Literature 
English Literature 

European History 
Foreign Language 



World History 

Writing 

Writing 



Score* 

700-800 
650-699 



700-800 
650-699 

700-800 
550-800 



n/a 
n/a 

n/a 



Score 

750-800 
700-749 



750-800 
700-749 

rt/a 

570-800 



750-800 
760-800 
710-759 



Granted Courses 

6 HIS 211, 212, 

6 after completion 

of 6 hours of history 

at 200 or 300 level 

with at least a 2.0 avg 

3 ENG 212 

Exemption from 

ENG 212 

6 WCV 101,102 

3 Foreign Language 

204 Intermediate 

level met. 

6 WCV 101,102 

3 ENG 101 

Exemption from 

ENG 101 



*For tests taken before March 1995. 

College Level Examination Program 
(Subject Examinations Only) 

The College Board offers these examinations at perma- 
nent test centers throughout the United States. Test center 
information can be obtained from secondary school counsel- 
ors or by writing to C.L.E.P., Box 6600, Princeton, NJ 08541. 
The test is designed for persons who have done college-level 
work outside college and can successfully demonstrate what 
they know. You may also visit the ETS Web site at www.ets. 
org. Also see the College Board Web site at www.collegeboard. 
com/clep as well as the UNCG Counseling and Testing Web 
site at http://studenthealth.uncg.edu/ctc. 

College Level Examination Program 
(Subject Exams Only) 



Minimum 
Score 

50 
50 
50 



Exam 

Accounting 
American Literature 
Analyzing & Interpreting 
Literature 

Biology 50 

Information Systems 57 
& Computer Applic. 

College Mathematics 50 

College Algebra 55 

Trigonometry 61 

College Algebra/Trig 58 

Calculus 50 

Chemistry 50 
Principles of Macroeconomics 50 
Principles of Microeconomics 50 

College Composition 50 

English Literature 50 

Foreign Language 50 

Psychology, Introductory 52 

Sociology, Introductory 50 



Hours 
Granted 

6 
6 
6 



Courses 

ACC 201, 202 
ENG 251, 252 
ENG 105, 106 

BIO 111, 112 
CSC 101 

MAT 112 

MAT 150 

MAT 151 

MAT 151 

MAT 191, 292 

CHE 111, 114 

ECO 202 

ECO 201 

ENG 101 

ENG 211, 212 

Foreign Language 

203, 204 

PSY 121 

SOC 101 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



21 



Admissions 



Credit for Military Training 

Elective credit for military training may be awarded 
where UNCG has comparable courses and upon receipt of an 
official American Council of Education transcript. 

Inter-institutional Registration 

Students taking courses through an inter-institutional 
agreement must meet the standards for participation in the 
program as set by their home institution and must follow the 
rules and policies of both campuses. 

Greater Greensboro Consortium/North Carolina 
Inter-institutional Agreement 

A student attending a college or university through the 
Greater Greensboro Consortium (Bennett College, Elon Uni- 
versity Greensboro College, Guilford College, High Point 
University, Guilford Technical Community College, and 
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University) 
or through the North Carolina Inter-institutional Agreement 
(with Duke University North Carolina Central University, 
North Carolina State University, The University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, and The University of North Carolina 
at Charlotte) is not classified as a visiting student at UNCG 
and does not go through the admissions process for the fall or 
spring semesters. Students wishing to register for regular— 
or main campus— courses at UNCG through the Greater 
Greensboro Consortium or the North Carolina Inter-institu- 
tional Agreement should contact the registrar of their home 
institutions. For Summer Sessions, the Greater Greensboro 
Consortium is in effect only with North Carolina Agricultural 
and Technical State University. 

UNCG students wishing to take courses at one of the 
Consortium institutions should request a Consortium form 
from the University Registrar's Office, 180 Mossman Build- 
ing, 336/334-5646. 

Students attending other schools participating in the 
Greater Greensboro Consortium or the North Carolina Inter- 
institutional Agreement who are interested in taking courses 
in the UNCG Summer Sessions should request a Summer 
Session Bulletin from the Division of Continual Learning 
(336/334-5414) and submit the application form found in that 
publication. 

Students who wish to register for courses at UNCG and 
who are not enrolled at another UNC system school must 
answer campus safety questions, per UNC Policy 700.5. 1[R]. 
Students may be required to submit to a criminal background 
check, based on their answers to the campus safety ques- 
tions. 

UNC Online Inter-institutional Agreement 

A student interested in taking an online course through 
one of the UNC system schools may consult The University of 
North Carolina Online Web site, http://online.northcarolina. 
edu/subjectlistc.php, for a list of available courses. Registra- 
tion requests also may be made through this Web site. 



Auditors 

Auditing a course is the privilege of being present in the 
classroom when space is available. No credit is involved, no 
examinations are required, and no grades are reported. Atten- 
dance, preparation, and participation in classroom discussion 
and activities are at the discretion of the department and the 
instructor. Registration for audited courses begins the first 
day of classes for a given semester and ends on the last day of 
late registration. 

Auditors Requiring a Record of Enrollment 
Current UNCG Students 

A currently enrolled UNCG student may audit a course 
upon the written approval of the instructor and must regis- 
ter officially for the course. A full-time UNCG undergradu- 
ate student (registered for 12 or more hours) may audit one 
course per semester without an additional fee. A part-time 
UNCG undergraduate student (registered for fewer than 12 
hours) may audit no more than two courses per semester and 
is charged a $15.00 fee for each audited course. 

Persons Not Enrolled at UNCG 

Persons not currently enrolled at UNCG who require a 
record of enrollment in a course as an auditor must follow 
regular admission procedures through the University Regis- 
trar's Office or The Graduate School. A fee equal to in-state or 
out-of-state tuition rates is charged for each course audited 
(see table in chapter 3). 

Registration for audited courses begins the first day of 
classes for any given semester and ends on the last day of late 
registration. Fees are payable in full at the time of enrollment. 

Continual Learning Visiting Auditors (Persons Not 
Requiring a Record of Enrollment) 

A person not currently enrolled at UNCG who desires to 
audit a course and who does not require a record of enroll- 
ment should secure a Visiting Auditor form from the Divi- 
sion of Continual Learning, Becher-Weaver Building, 915 
Northridge Street, 336/315-7044 or 1-866-334-CALL. Only 
Visiting Auditors should apply through the Division of Con- 
tinual Learning; all others must follow regular admission and 
registration procedures (see previous information). 

A Visiting Auditor may audit courses for a fee of $50 for 
each course (no record of enrollment is provided and no com- 
puter access is available). 

Only courses approved by academic departments are 
open to auditors. To audit a 600- or 700-level course, a visit- 
ing auditor must hold a bachelor's degree. Visiting auditors 
are permitted in lecture courses when space is available with 
the written approval of the department head or the instructor 
teaching the course. Persons may register as visiting auditors 
beginning the first day of classes for any given semester. 



22 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Admissions 



Summer Session 

Currently enrolled UNCG students who are continuing 
their studies at UNCG should register for summer courses in 
April, at the same time they register for fall classes. 

New or visiting students planning to attend Summer 
Session at UNCG must complete the Summer Student Infor- 
mation Form. Summer Session courses and the information 
form may be obtained in mid-March by accessing the Sum- 
mer Session Web page at http://summersession.uncg.edu, or 
by contacting the Division of Continual Learning, UNCG, 
Becher-Weaver Building, 915 Northridge Street, Greensboro 
NC 27402, phone 336/315-7044 (outside Greensboro 1-866- 
334-CALL). 

Permission to register for Summer Session does not 
constitute admission to the University nor any of its pro- 
grams for fall or spring semesters. 

Division of Continual Learning 

The Division of Continual Learning offers credit and non- 
credit programs that extend its academic resources to meet 
professional and personal learning needs of individuals. 

These programs may be offered on campus, off campus, 
or online, and include regular University credit courses, short 
courses, workshops, institutes, conferences and teleconfer- 
ences, and study abroad. Persons need not be admitted to 
UNCG in order to register for these courses but must meet 
course prerequisites. Students wishing to include this work in 
their degree programs should consult their advisors. 

Registration for these courses is handled by the Divi- 
sion of Continual Learning, Becher-Weaver Building, 915 
Northridge Street. For information access the DCL Web page 
at www.calldcl.com or call 336/315-7044 (outside Greensboro 
1-866-334-CALL). 



Senior Citizens 



Residents of North Carolina age 65 or older who meet 
applicable admission requirements may enroll tuition- and 
fee-free on a space available basis. The availability of course 
space is determined by the University Registrar at the close of 
registration for any given semester. 



Veterans 



Veterans enrollment certification is handled by the Uni- 
versity Registrar's Office, 180 Mossman Building, 336/334- 
5946, vabenefits@uncg.edu. 

UNCG is on the list of approved institutions that can 
provide training under the Department of Veterans Affairs 
Educational Training Program. A veteran wishing to receive 
educational benefits should apply first to Veterans Affairs for 
a Certificate of Eligibility. The student then applies for admis- 
sion to UNCG throug h normal admissions procedures. The 
issuing of a Certificate of Eligibility by the VA does not auto- 
matically assure a student of admission to UNCG. 



When enrolling at UNCG, the veteran should present a 
Certificate of Eligibility to the University Registrar requesting 
that certification of enrollment be sent to the VA. This Certifi- 
cation of Enrollment is necessary before educational benefits 
can be received. Certification of Enrollment must be requested 
for each academic year and again for summer session. 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
(ROTC) 

The United States Air Force and Army Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps programs are available to UNCG students at 
North Carolina A & T State University (in Greensboro). As 
a member of the Greater Greensboro Consortium, UNCG 
offers students these opportunities for leadership training 
and a commission in the Army or Air Force through cross- 
registration. 

The University will grant credit for certain ROTC courses 
taken at A & T State University as part of the Consortium 
arrangement. UNCG students will be awarded elective credit 
and quality points for junior and senior level ROTC courses 
completed at North Carolina A & T State University through 
the Consortium. 

Elective credit shall not exceed 12 semester hours for 
Army ROTC and Air Force ROTC. 

Accelerated Master's Programs for 
Undergraduates 

UNCG offers undergraduates with demonstrated aca- 
demic ability a fast track to a graduate degree. Talented stu- 
dents can earn a bachelor's and master's degree in approxi- 
mately five years instead of the usual six or seven. 

Although formal admission to an accelerated program is 
usually in the junior year, careful selection of undergraduate 
courses beginning in the freshman year is essential. Interested 
students should speak with an advisor in the department of 
their undergraduate major as early as possible. See Accel- 
erated Master's Programs in chapter 7 for specific program 
requirements. 



Graduate Students 

Students interested in working toward a graduate degree 
or students who hold a bachelor's degree and wish to continue 
their general education should consult The Graduate School 
Bulletin or contact The Graduate School Office, 241 Mossman 
Building, 336/334-5596, for admission information. The Gradu- 
ate School Bulletin can be obtained from The Graduate School 
office and is also available on The Graduate School's Web site 
at www.uncg.edu/grs. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



23 



3. Expenses, Payments, Refunds, 

& Financial Aid 



Tuition and Fees 

Estimated tuition and fee rates per semester hour for 
2009-10 are printed on the next page. Questions regarding 
tuition and fees should be directed to the Cashiers and Stu- 
dent Accounts Office (336/334-5831). UNCG reserves the right 
to make changes in these charges without advance notice. 

UNCG Estimated Annual Expenses 1 for 
Full-Time 2 Undergrads Living on Campus 



Tuition and Fees Per Year (2009-10 rates) 




Tuition 




In-State Students 


2,590.00 


Out-of-State Students 


14,351.00 


Athletic Fee 


461.00 


Student Facilities Fee 


272.00 


Student Activities Fee 


345.00 


Education & Technology Fee 


292.00 


Health Service Fee 


226.00 


Transportation Fee 


47.00 


Student Government Association Fee 


1.00 


Room Rates 3 Per Year (2009-10 rates) 




Double— Non Air Conditioned 


3,393.00 


Single— Non Air Conditioned 


5,090.00 


Double— Air Conditioned 


3,707.00 


Single— Air Conditioned 


5,561.00 


Single— Tower Village 


5,288.00 


Single— Spring Garden Apartments 


5,618.00 


Double— Traditional with Sink 


3,920.00 


Double— Traditional with Bath 


4,572.00 


Single— Summer (per session) 


658.00 


Dining Plans 3 Per Year (2009-10 rates) 




Platinum 75 Plan 


2,650.00 


Platinum 150 Plan 


2,800.00 


Platinum 200 Plan 


2,900.00 


Silver 400 Plan 


2,440.00 


Silver 550 Plan 


2,440.00 


Silver 700 Plan 


2,440.00 


Bronze 725 Plan 


1,750.00 


Bronze 875 Plan 


1,750.00 


Bronze 1000 Plan 


2,000.00 


Commuter/Apartment 325 Plan 


650.00 


Commuter/Apartment 450 Plan 


900.00 


Commuter/Apartment 600 Plan 


1,200.00 


Mini 75 


150.00 


Mini 150 


300.00 


Summer 325 Plan (per session) 


325.00 


Summer 400 Plan (per session) 


400.00 



Annual estimated total cost for most 

In-State students living on campus $10,591.00" 

Annual estimated total cost for most 
Out-of-State students living on campus $22,352.00" 

1 See the following pages for other estimated expenses such as sup- 
plies and books. 

1 A full-time undergraduate is one who is enrolled for at least 12 
semester hours per term. 

3 See details of applicable residence hall rates and dining plans on 
the following pages. 

4 Estimated total annual costs are based on the double, air- 
conditioned room rate and Platinum 75 dining plan and does not 
include miscellaneous and/or registration fees. 

Note: Students living on campus are required to contract 
with UNCG for room and board. Students living off campus 
pay only tuition and required fees. 

The tuition and academic fees paid by UNCG students 
only partially cover the cost of the education they receive. 
The remaining costs are met by funds from the State of North 
Carolina, from the UNCG Excellence Fund, and from alumni, 
friends, corporations, foundations, and the federal govern- 
ment. Undergraduate tuition and fees per semester and per 
credit hour for the 2009-10 academic year are indicated in the 
tables on the next page. 

Tuition & Fees for Part-Time Students 

For tuition and fee purposes, a part-time undergraduate 
student is defined as one taking fewer than 12 semester hours 
of course work each term. Students taking 12 or more hours 
per term pay the tuition and fees specified for full-time stu- 
dents. 

Undergraduate students taking fewer than 12 hours dur- 
ing a regular term will be charged a prorated portion of the 
tuition and the general fees. The health service fee is charged 
to students taking 9 or more hours; however, students taking 
fewer than 9 hours may voluntarily choose to pay the fee and 
enjoy the benefits of the Student Health Services. See the rate 
table on the following page for details. 



Residence Status 
for Tuition Purposes 

The tuition charge for persons who qualify as North Car- 
olina residents for tuition purposes is substantially less than 
that for nonresidents. An explanation of the North Carolina 
law (General Statute §116-143.1) governing residence classifi- 
cation for tuition purposes is set forth in Appendix A. A more 
complete explanation of the statute and the procedures under 
the statute is contained in A Manual to Assist the Public Higher 
Education Institutions of North Carolina in the Matter of Stu- 
dent Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes. The Manual 
is the controlling administrative statement of policy on this 



24 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



Undergraduate Tuition and Fee Rates for 2009-10 

These rates are subject to approval and/or modification by the North Carolina General Assembly. The UNC Board of Gover- 
nors and UNCG reserve the right to make changes in these charges without advance notice. 



Tuition & Fees Per Semester for Undergraduates 



Credit 
Hours 


Athletic 
Fee 


Student 
Facilities 


Student 
Activities 


E&T 1 
Fee 


Health 
Services 


Trans. 2 
Fee 


SGA 3 
Fee 


Total 

Student 

Fee 


In-State 
Tuition 


Out-of- 
State 
Tuition 


Total 
In-State 


Total 
Out-of- 
State 





19.21 


11.33 


14.38 


12.17 




1.96 


0.04 


59.09 


323.75 


1,793.88 


382.84 


1 ,852.97 


1 


19.21 


11.33 


14.38 


12.17 




1.96 


0.04 


59.09 


323.75 


1,793.88 


382.84 


1,852.97 


2 


38.42 


22.67 


28.75 


24.33 




3.92 


0.08 


118.17 


323.75 


1,793.88 


441.92 


1,912.05 


3 


57.63 


34.00 


43.13 


36.50 




5.88 


0.13 


177.27 


323.75 


1,793.88 


501.02 


1,971.15 


4 


76.83 


45.33 


57.50 


48.67 




7.83 


0.17 


236.33 


323.75 


1,793.88 


560.08 


2,030.21 


5 


96.04 


56.67 


71.88 


60.83 




9.79 


0.21 


295.42 


323.75 


1,793.88 


619.17 


2,089.30 


6 


115.25 


68.00 


86.25 


73.00 




11.75 


0.25 


354.50 


647.50 


3,587.75 


1,002.00 


3,942.25 


7 


1 34.46 


79.33 


100.63 


85.17 




13.71 


0.29 


413.59 


647.50 


3,587.75 


1,061.09 


4,001.34 


8 


153.67 


90.67 


115.00 


97.33 




15.67 


0.33 


472.67 


647.50 


3,587.75 


1,120.17 


4,060.42 


9 


172.88 


102.00 


129.38 


109.50 


84.75 


17.63 


0.38 


616.52 


971.25 


5,381.63 


1,587.77 


5,998.15 


10 


192.08 


113.33 


143.75 


121.67 


84.75 


19.58 


0.42 


675.58 


971.25 


5,381.63 


1,646.83 


6,057.21 


11 


211.29 


124.67 


158.13 


133.83 


84.75 


21.54 


0.46 


734.67 


971.25 


5,381.63 


1,705.92 


6,116.30 


12+ 


230.50 


136.00 


172.50 


146.00 


113.00 


23.50 


0.50 


822.00 


1,295.00 


7,175.50 


2,117.00 


7,997.50 



Education and Technology 



transportation 



3 Student Government Association 



Distance Learning Charges for Undergraduates" 



In-State Tuition 

Out-of-State Tuition 

Technology Fee 

Student Government Association Fee 

Registration Fees Per Semester 

Registration Fee 

Pre Registration Late Fee 

Registration Late Fee 

Miscellaneous Fees Per Semester 

Student Health Insurance 

Special One Time Fees 
Orientation 

Undergraduate Freshmen— August 
Undergraduate Freshmen— January 
Undergraduate Transfer 
Undergraduate Adult 

Graduation 

Baccalaureate Degree 
Master's Degree 
Doctoral Degree 
Combined M.S./Ed.S. Degree 

*Per credit hour 



$ 87.50 

$484.83 

$9.86 

$0.03 

$6.00 
$30.00 
$45.00 

$390.00 



$135.00 
$65.00 
$65.00 
$65.00 

$55.00 
$60.00 
$60.00 
$75.00 



Meal Plans Per Semester 

Platinum 75 (unlimited trips to CAF 

+ $75 declining balance) $1,325.00 

Platinum 150 (unlimited trips to CAF 

+ $150 declining balance) $1,400.00 

Platinum 200 (unlimited trips to CAF 

+ $200 declining balance) $1,450.00 

Silver 400 (160 trips to CAF 

+ $400 declining balance) $1,220.00 

Silver 550 (115 trips to CAF 

+ $550 declining balance) $1,220.00 

Silver 700 (80 trips to CAF 

+ $700 declining balance) $1,220.00 

Bronze 725 (25 trips to CAF 

+ $725 declining balance) $875.00 

Bronze 875 ($875 all declining balance) $875.00 

Bronze 1000 ($1,000 all declining balance) $1,000.00 

Commuter/ Apartment 325 

($325 declining balance) $325.00 

Commuter/Apartment 450 

($450 declining balance) $450.00 

Commuter/Apartment 600 

($600 declining balance) $600.00 

Mini 75 ($75 declining balance) $75.00 

Mini 150 ($150 declining balance) $150.00 

Summer 325 ($325 declining balance) $325.00 

Summer 400 ($400 declining balance) $400.00 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



25 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



subject. Copies of the Manual are available for inspection in 
the Office of the Provost, in the Jackson Library, and online at 
www.uncg.edu/pvt/residency/pdf/residency_manual.pdf. 

Initial Classification 

Every applicant for admission is required to state in writ- 
ing the length of his or her legal residence in North Carolina. 
Every applicant is classified as a resident or nonresident for 
tuition purposes prior to actual matriculation, the admitting 
office making the initial classification. Those not claiming to 
be residents for tuition purposes are, of course, classified as 
out-of-state students (nonresidents) for tuition purposes. If 
insufficient information supports an applicant's claim to be a 
resident for tuition purposes, the admitting office will initially 
classify that applicant as a nonresident. 

Classification Review 

A residency classification once assigned (and confirmed 
pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may be changed 
thereafter (with corresponding change in billing rates) only 
at intervals corresponding with the established primary divi- 
sions of the academic year. 

A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eli- 
gible for a change in classification, whether from out-of-state 
to in-state or the reverse, has the responsibility of applying 
for a reclassification in the Office of the Provost as indicated 
below. 

Appeals 

A student may appeal a residence classification assigned 
by the admitting office by submitting to the Office of the 
Provost a completed "Residence-and-Tuition Status Applica- 
tion." The completed application must be submitted before 
the end of the last day of classes of the academic term for 
which the student wishes to be considered for reclassifica- 
tion. Application forms may be obtained from the Office of 
the Provost, 201 Mossman, from any admitting office, or at 
www.uncg.edu/pvt/residency 

It is the responsibility of the student to pay tuition at the 
rate charged and billed by the payment deadline while an 
appeal is pending. In effect, the student who is classified as 
a nonresident at the time of registration pays the nonresident 
rate. Conversely, if a student is classified as a resident at the 
time of billing, he or she pays the resident rate. Any necessary 
adjustments in the rate paid will be made at the conclusion of 
the appeal. 

Students or prospective students who believe that they 
are entitled to be classified as residents for tuition purposes 
should be aware that the process of requests and appeals can 
take a considerable amount of time and that applications for 
classification should not be delayed until registration. Stu- 
dents who wish to receive a timely review of their residence 
status should submit their completed "Residence-and-Tuition 
Status Application" no more than ninety (90) days before the 
term for which they are seeking a review of their residence 
status. Applications are reviewed in the order in which they 
are received; failure to submit a fully completed application 
with attachments in a timely manner may delay the review 
process. 

The Office of the Provost's determination of residence 
classification may be appealed to the Campus Residence 
Appeals Committee, and decisions of the Campus Residence 



Appeals Committee may be appealed to the State Residence 
Committee. A written statement of the appeals procedure is 
provided to every applicant or student receiving an out-of- 
state classification from the Office of the Provost. 

25% Tuition Surcharge for 
Undergraduates 

The General Assembly has instituted a twenty-five per- 
cent (25%) tuition surcharge (Section 89 (b), Senate Bill 27, 
1993 Session), which became effective fall semester 1994 and 
applies to all new undergraduates seeking a baccalaureate 
degree. Specifically, it states, 

"The Board of Governors of The University of 
North Carolina shall ensure that procedures are 
established that are necessary to impose a twenty- 
five percent (25%) tuition surcharge on students who 
take more than 140 degree credit hours to complete a 
baccalaureate degree in a four-year program or more 
than one hundred ten percent (110%) of the credit 
hours necessary to complete a baccalaureate degree 
in any program officially designated by the Board of 
Governors as a five-year program. The calculation of 
these credit hours taken at a constituent institution 
or accepted for transfer shall exclude hours earned 
through the College Board's Advanced Placement or 
CLEP examinations, through institutional advanced 
placement or course validation, or through summer 
term or extension programs." 

Students Subject to the Surcharge 

The tuition surcharge will be applied to new undergrad- 
uate students enrolled for the first time in fall 1994 and there- 
after in a degree program at UNCG as follows: 

(1) For students earning a first baccalaureate degree 
in a program that requires no more than 128 credit 
hours, the surcharge shall be applied to all hours in 
excess of 140. 

(2) For students earning a first baccalaureate degree in 
a UNC Board of Governors Board-approved pro- 
gram that requires more than 128 credit (semester) 
hours, the surcharge shall be applied to all hours 
that exceed 110 percent of the credit hours required 
for the degree. Such programs include those that 
have been officially designated by the Board of 
Governors as five-year programs as well as those 
involving double majors, or combined bachelor's/ 
master's degrees. 

(3) For students earning a baccalaureate degree other 
than their first, the surcharge shall be applied to 
all hours that exceed 110 percent of the minimum 
additional credit hours needed to earn the addi- 
tional baccalaureate degree. The minimum addi- 
tional credit hours will be determined by the degree 
evaluation performed by the Office of the Univer- 
sity Registrar during the first semester a student 

is enrolled in the second or other baccalaureate 
degree. 
Students seeking a second baccalaureate degree are 
required to take 31 credit hours of residency at UNCG. 



26 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



The surcharge will be imposed in the fall or spring semes- 
ter and in all subsequent semesters where a student's cumula- 
tive credit hour total exceeds the threshold. The surcharge 
does not apply to required fees. 

Hours included in Tuition Surcharge Hours: 

The undergraduate credit (semester) hours to be counted 
in the calculation of the tuition surcharge include: 

(1) all semester (fall and spring semester) academic credit 
hours attempted (includes repeated course work, failed 
course work, and course withdrawals); and 

(2) all transfer credit hours accepted by UNCG. 

Hours excluded from Tuition Surcharge Hours: 

(1) College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) credit; 

(2) College Level Examination Program (CLEP) or similar 
programs' credits; 

(3) credit earned through any UNCG advanced placement, 
course validation or similar procedure; 

(4) credit earned in summer sessions at UNCG or another 
UNC institution; 

(5) credit earned from an extension division of any UNC 
institution, including UNCG. 

If a student receives a North Carolina Student Incen- 
tive Grant and is billed Tuition Surcharge, the student may 
become ineligible for funds. 

Students will be informed of the Tuition Surcharge Hours 
earned each semester and cumulatively in their tuition bill- 
ing. 

Students may contact the Office of the University Reg- 
istrar to obtain current information on their credit/semester 
hours. 



Housing Plans 

All UNCG students have the option of living on or off 
campus. Approximately 4,200 students live in 24 residence 
halls on campus. UNCG houses students without regard to 
race, creed, color, sexual orientation, gender, age, religion, 
military veteran status, political affiliation, or national origin. 
Students may request residence halls or roommates by name, 
and whenever possible, such requests will be honored. 

To request a space, students must log in to the UNCG 
Housing & Residence Life Web site at http://hrl.uncg.edu. 
Descriptions of the halls and directions for applying for hous- 
ing are available on the Web site. 

Current housing costs are outlined in the following table. 
Also see additional housing information in chapter 8. 



Annual 

The 
Double - 
Single— 
Double- 
Single— 
Single— 
Single— 
Double - 
Double- 
Single— 



Housing Rates (2009-10 rates) 

following rates include Internet and cable 



-Non Air Conditioned $3,393 

Non Air Conditioned $5,090 

-Air Conditioned $3,707 

Air Conditioned $5,561 

Tower Village $5,288 
Spring Garden Apartments $5,618 

-Traditional with Sink $3,920 

-Traditional with Bath $4,572 

Summer Session $658.00 



TV charges. 
.00 per year 
.00 per year 
.00 per year 
.00 per year 
.00 per year 
.00 per year 
.00 per year 
.00 per year 
per session 



Meal Plans 

All students who live on campus are required to purchase 
a meal plan for use in the UNCG dining locations. Please visit 
http://aux.uncg.edu and click on UNCG Dining Services for 
the latest information on meal plans. 

All meal plans are purchased per semester. Changes to 
meal plans may be made up until the fifth day of classes. 

Unused declining balance transfers from the fall to the 
spring semester. At the end of the spring semester, any unused 
declining balance is nonrefundable and cannot be transferred 
to the next academic year. Meal plans cannot be transferred 
from semester to semester. See chapter 8 for complete details 
about available UNCG Dining Services. 

Miscellaneous Fees and Expenses 

Athletic, Activity, and Facilities Fees 

Payment of these fees gives students access to athletic 
events, campus organizations, Elliott University Center (stu- 
dent union), and many other student programs. 

Auditing Fees 

Current UNCG Students. A registered full-time (12 or 
more hours) UNCG student may audit one course per term 
without charge. A registered part-time UNCG student may 
audit no more than two courses per term and is charged a fee 
of $15.00 per course. 

Division of Continual Learning Visiting Auditors. 
Visiting auditors are classified as non-UNCG students who 
wish to take a course without receiving a record of enroll- 
ment. Such individuals must apply to register through the 
Division of Continual Learning. A Visiting auditor will not 
receive a record of enrollment and is charged a $50.00 fee per 
course. 

Registered auditors (persons not officially enrolled at 
UNCG) who do require a record of enrollment as an auditor 
should follow regular admission, registration, and payment 
procedures. Tuition and fees equal to in-state or out-of-state 
tuition rates is charged for each course audited. 

Fees are payable in full at the time of enrollment. See 
Admissions for details about auditing courses. 

Books and Course Supplies 

Costs generally run $250-$500 per semester for textbooks 
and related supplies for full-time students. These are to be 
paid for as purchased, either from the UNCG Bookstore or 
elsewhere. A few courses may require significantly higher 
expenditures for supplies or special fees and are so noted in 
the online Schedule of Courses footnotes. 

Furnishings (Traditional Residence Hall) 

All residence hall rooms are furnished with beds, dress- 
ers, and desks. All have community bathrooms by floor or 
wing. Students furnish their own pillows, pillow cases, sheets, 
blankets, bedspreads, towels, and room accessories such as 
study lamps, draperies, rugs, recycling bins, and wastebas- 
kets. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



27 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



Graduation Application Fee 

The graduation fee, currently $55 for the baccalaureate 
degree, covers the expenses of the diploma and other costs 
associated with the commencement ceremony and is charged 
to all degree candidates. It is payable in the Cashiers and Stu- 
dent Accounts Office 30 days prior to graduation. The fee is 
non-refundable. Degree candidates purchase or rent regalia 
from the University Bookstore. 

Identification Cards (UNCG SpartanCard) 

A permanent UNCG SpartanCard will be issued to each 
student upon completion of registration for their first semes- 
ter at UNCG. A replacement fee is charged for lost, stolen, or 
damaged IDs. 

Internet/Cable Connections 

All residence hall rooms are provided with Internet 
access through Time Warner Cable. Students must provide 
their own computer equipment. 

Laundry 

SpartanCard-ready washing machines and dryers are 
located in each residence hall. Students may apply money to 
their UNCG SpartanCard for laundry and vending expenses. 

Parking Permits 

Parking permits are required for all student-operated 
motor vehicles that park on the UNCG campus. See The Uni- 
versity Community for details on parking regulations. 

Transcript Fee 

A fee (currently $5 per copy) is charged for release of an 
official UNCG academic transcript. 

Uniforms, Special Equipment, and Liability 
Insurance 

Students are expected to use outfits appropriate to the 
physical education activities taken. Gym clothing, leotards, 
and other appropriate outfits are available from the Univer- 
sity Book Store. 

Nursing majors are required to purchase uniforms and 
liability insurance. See School of Nursing in chapter 7 for 
complete details. 

Some majors in Exercise and Sport Science are also 
required to purchase liability insurance. See Department of 
Exercise Kinesiology in chapter 7 for details. 

Many laboratory courses require safety goggles and spe- 
cial protective clothing. Smocks or coveralls are often required 
in art classes. Unless the student has advance information, it 
is preferable to purchase these items after arrival. 

Payment of Tuition and Fees 
and Payment Plans 

Payment of Bills 

The annual expenses table provides estimated costs on 
a nine-month academic year basis for full-time students. To 
estimate the amount due each term, divide the total expense 
figure by two. This is the approximate amount that will be 
billed to the student by the University during registration 
each term. If financial aid has been awarded to a student, the 
amount will be reflected on the electronic bill (see informa- 
tion below). 



Continuing students who register during the current 
term for the next term receive electronic bills for tuition and 
fees as follows: 

Fall term bills are sent electronically in July to students 
with total payment due in late July or early August. 

Spring term bills are sent electronically in mid-Novem- 
ber to students with total payment due in early December. 

Bills are not sent to new students who register in August/ 
January. Students should print bills along with their class 
schedules when they register, and are expected to pay upon 
registration. 

Payment Deadlines 

Payment of bills for the fall and spring terms should be 
made in the Cashiers and Student Accounts Office, 151 Moss- 
man Building, online through UNCGenie and the Student 
Account Center, or by mail to UNCG Cashiers and Student 
Accounts Office, PO Box 26170, Greensboro NC 27402, by the 
deadline dates published in the Registration Guide and online 
at www.uncg.edu/reg. Payments not received by these dates 
will result in the cancellation of registration. Payment by 
mail or via the Web is encouraged. Students should contact 
the Cashiers and Student Accounts Office (336/334-5831) with 
any questions about tuition and fees or the payment process. 

ID Validation 

SpartanCard IDs are validated electronically upon pay- 
ment of tuition and fees. 

Banking Information 

Wachovia Bank ATMs are located in the Bryan School 
of Business and Economics, Elliott University Center, and 
the main dining hall. There is also a State Employees' Credit 
Union Cashpoints ATM in the Elliott University Center and a 
Bank of America ATM in the main dining hall. Students are 
encouraged to establish checking accounts at one of the banks 
in Greensboro. Wachovia Bank offers students registered with 
the University free checking with no minimum balance. Stu- 
dent identification cards will enable students to cash checks 
for up to $50 at the Cashiers and Student Accounts Office for a 
fee of 50<t per check. Checks that are returned for nonpayment 
will be charged a $25.00 returned check fee for each returned 
check. This fee will be assessed to either the maker of the 
check or last endorser (whoever last negotiated the check). 
UNCG has the authority to cancel term registrations for non- 
payments resulting from returned checks. 

The Cashiers and Student Accounts Office is open 
between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 
is located in 151 Mossman Building (336/334-5831). 



Student Credit Policy 

Tuition and fees for all University students are due, prior 
to the established payment deadlines for that particular term, 
and payable in the Cashiers and Student Accounts Office. 
North Carolina law requires the University to charge and col- 
lect from each student at the beginning of each academic ses- 
sion tuition, fees, and an amount sufficient to pay all other 
direct expenses such as room and board incurred for the term. 
Payments may be made by cash, money order, or check in 



28 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



person, or online by electronic check, MasterCard, Discover, 
or American Express. Cash should not be sent through the 
mail. 

As an exception to the above policy, students may be 
granted deferments (credit) only if they meet one of the fol- 
lowing criteria: 

(1) Students who receive awards through the UNCG 
Financial Aid Office from one or more of the follow- 
ing programs must pay the amount of their bill less the 
amount awarded for deferrable financial aid. Any liabil- 
ity resulting from a reduction of financial aid becomes 
the student's responsibility payable upon notification of 
the adjustment of the award. Financial aid awards for 
purposes of the credit policy are as follows: Pell Grants, 
Stafford Student Loans, Institutional Loans, SEOG, 
Perkins Loan, Federal PLUS Loan, Federal Graduate 
PLUS Loan, Academic Competitiveness Grant, National 
SMART Grant, N.C. Veteran Scholarships, Vocational 
Rehabilitation, University Scholarships, Fellowships, 
Assistantships, Grants, and Federal Work Study. 

(2) Students wishing to utilize Veterans' benefits under the 
credit policy must demonstrate financial need in com- 
pliance with normal financial aid need standards. Final 
approval is contingent upon the student's demonstra- 
tion of need and a good credit history with the Univer- 
sity. 

(3) Recipients of scholarships awarded by organizations 
outside the University in which direct payment is made 
to UNCG and notification is on file with the Financial 
Aid Office may qualify under the credit policy. Students 
should provide notification of such awards as soon as 
possible to the Financial Aid Office. 



UNCG Refund Policy 

PART I: Policy for Students Completely 
Withdrawing From UNCG 

Official Notice of Intent to Completely Withdraw from 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Students who find that they must withdraw from 
the University can do so by dropping all courses through 
UNCGenie via the Web site. Students who drop all courses are 
considered to be withdrawn from the University and must 
seek reactivation or readmission through either Undergradu- 
ate Admissions or The Graduate School to return to school in 
subsequent terms. 

In the case of a major disaster, including a pandemic flu 
occurrence, UNCG will follow UNC General Administration 
refunding guidelines, and in the absence of such guidelines, 
UNCG Executive Staff decisions. 

Students who wish to discuss the academic consequences 
of a change in enrollment status at the University may contact: 
undergraduates— Student Academic Services, 159 Mossman 
Building; graduate students— The Graduate School Office, 
241 Mossman Building. 

There will be a $50.00 non-refundable processing fee 
charged to all students who completely withdraw from the 
University. 



Complete Withdrawal from UNCG for Students 
Activated for Military Duty including the Armed 
Services Reserve and the National Guard 

If a student is involuntarily called for active duty during 
a currently enrolled semester, the following refund guide- 
lines apply. 

• The return of funds calculation will be completed under 
the normal terms and conditions as applicable. 

• The student will be expected to provide correspondence 
supporting the call to active military duty. 

Students who serve in the Armed Services Reserve or the 
National Guard are often alerted that they may be called to 
active duty for various reasons. If any student is voluntarily 
or involuntarily called for active duty during a term in which 
he or she is enrolled, the eligible student may elect one of the 
following options. 

A. Complete Withdrawal Option 
(without academic penalty) 

1. Tuition and general fees will be fully refundable. 

2. Health fees generally will be fully refundable except for 
students who have used the University's health services. 
These students would be billed at the fee for service 
rate to a maximum charge equivalent to the health fee. 
Students who have enrolled in the Student Health Insur- 
ance program should contact the Agent for information 
on a pro-rated refund of premium. 

3. Room and board will be refunded based on the number 
of weeks the room was occupied and the meals con- 
sumed. 

4. The student will be responsible for any miscellaneous 
charges such as library fines, parking permits, parking 
tickets, health service charges, etc. 

5. In order to be eligible for a refund under these guide- 
lines, the student must contact the University Registrar's 
Office and provide the following: 

a. a copy of his or her call-up papers; these "orders" 
will serve as documentation for the refund of 
tuition and fees. 

b. a mailing address to which the student would like 
the refund to be sent. 

The University Registrar's Office will notify appropriate 
offices of the student's withdrawal including Student 
Academic Services, The Graduate School, Financial Aid 
Office, Housing and Residence Life, and the Cashiers 
and Student Accounts Office. 

6. In order for students living in University housing to 
receive a refund from the Department of Housing and 
Residence Life, they must return their room keys to the 
appropriate office. 

7. If a student is receiving financial aid during the term 
in which he or she is called to active duty, financial aid 
must be repaid according to federal and state guidelines 
before a refund will be issued by the University. 

B. Early Exam Option 

Eligible students who are required to report for military 
duty not earlier than four calendar weeks prior to the date 
a semester ends as stated in the official bulletin of the Uni- 
versity, or after completion of at least 75% of the enrollment 
period in a non-standard semester, may, when authorized 



2009-20 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



29 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



by the instructor, take exams early and be given full credit 
for all courses for which they have an average of C or better. 
Students are ineligible for refunds for courses for which they 
receive credit. 

C. Incomplete Grade Option 

Students, when called to active duty may opt to take an 
incomplete in a course and complete the course upon release 
from active duty. Course completion may be accomplished 
by independent study or by retaking the course without 
payment of tuition and fees; the student need not reregister 
for the course upon his or her return. Under federal finan- 
cial aid policies, a course that is retaken this way may not be 
counted toward a student's enrollment load. Eligible students 
who receive an incomplete for any course for which they are 
enrolled shall not be entitled to any refund of tuition or fees 
paid. 

D. Returning to the University 

1. If a student is called for active duty and subsequently 
released in a manner that would allow them to re- 
enroll during the semester in which they withdrew, the 
University will make every effort to accommodate the 
request. Individual contacts with faculty involved will 
determine appropriateness of returning to a course. 

2. Students who are called to active duty during a semes- 
ter, and who withdraw from the University, are techni- 
cally ineligible to participate in early registration for the 
term in which they wish to re-enroll; however, UNCG 
will make every effort to give these students special 
dispensation and to allow them to pre-register for that 
term. 

Summer Session Withdrawal 

Students who completely withdraw from their summer 
courses will be handled with the same refund policy that 
applies to the regular academic year. 



Return of Federal Title IV Funds 

The federally mandated Return of Funds Policy governs 
the return of Title IV funds disbursed to students who com- 
plete the official withdrawal process as defined by the Uni- 
versity. The term refund should be understood to mean the 
repayment of money received by the University for tuition 
and fees or for a reduction of charges if tuition and fees have 
not yet been paid. Title IV funds include Federal Unsubsi- 
dized and Subsidized Stafford Loans, Federal Perkins Loans, 
Federal Graduate PLUS Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, Federal 
Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants (SEOG), Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG), 
National SMART Grant, and NCSIG. 

Unearned Title IV funds must be returned to the Title IV 
programs. Unearned aid is the amount of disbursed Title IV 
aid that exceeds the amount of earned Title IV aid. During 
the first 60% of the enrollment period (semester or term), a 
student earns funds in direct proportion to the length of time 
he or she remains enrolled. The period of time during which a 
student is enrolled is the percentage of aid earned by the stu- 
dent. A student who remains enrolled beyond the 60% point 
earns all Title IV aid for the term. 

The percentage of the period that a student remains 
enrolled is determined by dividing the number of days the 
student attended by the number of days in the term. Calendar 
days are used in the determination of percentages. Breaks of 
five (5) days or longer are excluded in the calculations. The 
percentage may be found by using the following formula: 

100% - (number of days the student attended^) 
number of days in the semester 

If the amount of the Title IV funds disbursed is greater 
than the amount of Title IV funds earned by a student, a 
return of Title IV funds is necessary. Both the University and 
the student are responsible for returning a percentage of the 
unearned aid. 



Example of Total Withdrawal Refund Calculation 1 
Day Refund Day Refund Day Refund 



Day Refund 



1 


1 00% 


19 


84% 


37 


68% 


55 


53% 


2 


98% 


20 


83% 


38 


68% 


56 


52% 


3 


97% 


21 


82% 


39 


67% 


57 


51% 


4 


97% 


22 


81% 


40 


66% 


58 


50% 


5 


96% 


23 


80% 


41 


65% 


59 


50% 


6 


95% 


24 


79% 


42 


64% 


60 


49% 


7 


94% 


25 


79% 


43 


63% 


61 


48% 


8 


93% 


26 


78% 


44 


62% 


62 


47% 


9 


92% 


27 


77% 


45 


62% 


63 


46% 


10 


91% 


28 


76% 


46 


61% 


64 


45% 


11 


91% 


29 


75% 


47 


60% 


65 


44% 


12 


90% 


30 


74% 


48 


59% 


66 


44% 


13 


89% 


31 


74% 


49 


58% 


67 


43% 


14 


88% 


32 


73% 


50 


57% 


68 


42% 


15 


87% 


33 


72% 


51 


56% 


69 


41% 


16 


86% 


34 


71% 


52 


56% 


70 


40% 


17 


85% 


35 


70% 


53 


55% 


71- 


0% 


18 


85% 


36 


69% 


54 


54% 


117 





'Actual refund calculation percentages for a specific semester are available on the University's Web site 



M) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



The University will return federal funds to the appro- 
priate federal program up to the total net amount disbursed 
from each source as required by law. The prescribed order of 
return is: 

• Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan 

• Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan 

• Federal Perkins Loan 

• Federal Graduate PLUS Loans 

• Federal PLUS Loan 

• Federal Pell Grant 

• Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) 

• National SMART Grant 

• SEOG 

• Other Title IV Programs 

Return of Non-Federal Funds 

UNCG will return Non-Federal funds received and 
applied to a student's account in the same manner as it is 
applied in the "Return of Federal Title IV Funds." However, 
any outstanding financial obligation to UNCG will be deducted 
from the amount of Non-Federal funds to be returned. Funds 
will be returned to the student unless they are requested by 
the source from which the funds were disbursed. When a stu- 
dent completes the withdrawal process, the Cashiers and Stu- 
dent Accounts Office will initiate a refund and mail it to the 
student's campus box or local mailing address. 

If a student still has an outstanding financial obligation 
as a result of this process, the University will bill the student 
for payment. 

PART II: Policy for Students Who Drop Course 
Hours 

The refund policy applies to complete withdrawals from 
UNCG. If a student simply reduces his/her course load after 
the Late Registration and Drop/Add period (refer to the Uni- 
versity Academic Calendar for dates), no refund or reduc- 
tion of charges whatsoever will be credited to the student's 
account. However, if the drop in hours occurs before the end 
of the Late Registration and Drop/Add period, the student is 
entitled to a full refund for the hours dropped. If the change 
results in the creation of a credit balance, a check will be gen- 
erated and mailed to the student's campus box or local mail- 
ing address or through direct deposit. 

If students reduce the amounts of their credit hours dur- 
ing a summer session, they should then refer to the last day 
for tuition refund for a drop in credit hours chart listed in 
the Summer Session Calendar published in the Summer Ses- 
sion Bulletin. 

Housing and Dining Plan Refunds 

Room rent and board are NOT refundable. However, if a 
student qualifies for an exception as stated above, room rent 
and board are refundable except the pro rata part of the remain- 
ing charge based on the expired portion of the term. The hous- 
ing contract is for one academic year. Students who cancel their 
contract at the end of the fall semester and remain enrolled at 
the University, will be charged for the spring semester rent and 
meal plan. Also see information in chapter 8. 



Late Fee for Registration 

Continuing students eligible to register during early 
registration for the following semester who choose not to 
do so, or who fail to confirm their registration with payment 
of tuition and fees will be charged a late fee. Waiver of the 
late fee will be considered only when it can be demonstrated 
that the University, through one of its offices or officials, was 
directly responsible for the failure of the student to complete 
registration. 

University Refund Appeals Committee 

The University Refund Appeals Committee considers 
appeals from any student who wishes to submit an appeal in 
writing. Cases are referred to the committee when a student 
feels that the University's refund policies do not address par- 
ticular circumstances. 

The refund appeals committee will not review appeals 
that are more than one year old. If the original appeal is 
denied, the student has the right to reappeal one time as long 
as they can provide new documentation with the reappeal. If 
the second appeal is denied and the student feels it deserves 
further consideration, the appeal will be referred to the Vice 
Chancellor for Business Affairs. 

Questions pertaining to the refund appeals committee 
should be directed to the Cashiers and Student Accounts 
Office, 151 Mossman Building, 336/334-5831 or 877/286- 
8250. Appeal forms are available in the Cashiers and Student 
Accounts Office and on their Web site: 

http://fsv.uncg.edu/cashiers/RefundComRequest.pdf 



Financial Aid at UNCG 

UNCG administers an extensive financial aid program 
which provides assistance to more than half the University's 
enrolled undergraduates. Available aid includes scholarships, 
grants, loans, and work-study Eligibility for need-based pro- 
grams is determined through an analysis of family financial 
information provided on the Free Application for Federal Stu- 
dent Aid [FAFSA]. Students who file the FAFSA by the prior- 
ity filing date of March 1 are also considered for non-need- 
based aid programs. For information on programs, services, 
and application procedures, contact the Financial Aid Office 
at the following address: 

UNCG Financial Aid Office 

PO Box 26170 

Greensboro, NC 27402-6170 

Tel: 336/334-5702 *E-mail: finaid@uncg.edu 

Web site: http://fia.uncg.edu 

Hours: MTWF 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Th 8 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Please note: Summer hours may vary 

The Financial Aid Office is located at 723 Kenilworth 
Street on the UNCG campus. 

Residents of North Carolina may contact the College 
Foundation of North Carolina, PO Box 41977, Raleigh, NC 
27629-1966, phone- 1-888-234-6400, or visit their Web site at 
www.cfnc.org for information about North Carolina aid pro- 
grams. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



31 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



Support for UNCG's financial aid program comes from 
federal and state governments, and from individuals, foun- 
dations, and corporations. Awards are granted and adminis- 
tered according to the provisions determined by the contrib- 
uting agency or donor. 

Renewal of a student's award from federal and state 
sources is contingent on continued support from government 
agencies and on the annual determination of the student's eli- 
gibility. Federal and state programs change frequently, so spe- 
cific types of awards may not be available each year. Award 
amounts may vary year to year, based on available funds and 
changes in a student's financial need status. 

You must keep your telephone number, mailing address, 
and e-mail address* current. Many circumstances arise which 
require that the Financial Aid Office contact you in an imme- 
diate fashion. 

You must notify the Financial Aid Office in writing if 
you: 

a) choose not to accept all or a portion of your aid 
package. 

b) intend to withdraw from or cease enrollment at 
UNCG. 

c) receive any form of additional aid. 

d) plan to enroll for less than a full-time course load 
(12 s.h. undergraduate, 6 s.h. graduate). 

*E-mail is the primary means of communication from the Finan- 
cial Aid Office to students. Students may update their e-mail 
addresses via UNCGenie, from the UNCG Web site at www. 
uncg.edu. 

UNCG Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress 
for Financial Aid Purposes 

All students receiving financial aid (scholarships, grants, 
loans, and/or work-study) are required to meet the standards 
of the UNCG Policy of Satisfactory Academic Progress for 
Financial Aid Purposes in order to maintain eligibility for 
funding. Further information concerning this policy is avail- 
able through the Financial Aid Office or its Web site. 

Conditions of Award Receipt 

Most types of financial aid at UNCG are applied directly 
to the student's UNCG account. Any financial aid funds that 
exceed the current semester charges are mailed by the Cashiers 
and Student Accounts Office to the student's campus or local 
address in the form of a refund check. Some types of financial 
aid cannot be applied directly to the student's account and 
require that the student sign a check at the UNCG Cashiers 
and Student Accounts Office. Students who must sign a check 
are notified by mail by that office. 

In order for funds to be disbursed to the student, whether 
by the automated process or by manual disbursement, stu- 
dents must have completed all requirements of the aid receipt 
process. These requirements include: 

1) Receive award letter from the Financial Aid Office 
with all awards listed, and complete any requested 
paperwork. 

2) Resolve any existing financial aid holds. 

3) Be registered for the required credit hours on which 
your award was based. 



4) Confirm your classes by paying the total amount 
due on your bill for the semester, or have aid in 
place to cover the amount of your bill. 

5) Comply with University immunization require- 
ments. 

It is the student's responsibility to meet the above require- 
ments and to assure that all documentation requested by the 
Financial Aid Office is received. 

General Grants and Scholarships 

The Financial Aid Office awards a limited number of gen- 
eral institutional grants and scholarships, ranging in value 
from $100 to $2,000 per year, to students (new and continu- 
ing) who have above-average academic records, meet spe- 
cific award requirements as established by the donors, and/ 
or have financial need. These awards may not be renewable. 
A listing of these awards and application requirements may 
be found on the Financial Aid Web site at http://fia.uncg.edu. 
FAFSA filers are automatically considered for need-based and 
non-need-based aid. 

Departmental Grants and Scholarships 

Some scholarships are restricted by academic major. 
Recipients of these scholarships are generally nominated or 
selected by academic departments or schools, or, in some 
cases, by designated committees, and are generally restricted 
to students in specific areas of study or special programs. For 
a listing of these scholarships, please visit the Financial Aid 
Web site at http://fia.uncg.edu. 

Outside Scholarships 

Students are encouraged to inquire with their local high 
school counseling staff, chamber of commerce, and pub- 
lic library to find sources of scholarship assistance. Sources 
include civic organizations, professional organizations, 
employers, high schools, and religious organizations. Stu- 
dents may visit the UNCG Financial Aid Office to review its 
collection of outside scholarship announcements, which is 
updated and maintained on an ongoing basis as announce- 
ments are received. Students may also access free scholarship 
databases on the Web through links from the UNCG Financial 
Aid Web site. 

Donors of outside scholarships should be instructed to 
send checks to the Financial Aid Office. Checks should include 
the name of the scholarship, the term(s) for which the award 
is made, and the student's complete legal name and UNCG 
student ID number. If the donor does not provide instruc- 
tions otherwise, the amount of the scholarship check will be 
divided and applied to the student's account equally for the 
fall and spring semesters. 

Merit Awards Program 

The Merit Awards Program includes the most selective 
academic excellence awards made by UNCG. The winners 
are among the most outstanding students at UNCG, and 
their achievements enrich and enhance the University. More 
than forty renewable scholarships ranging from $2,500 to full 
tuition, fees, room, and board per year are offered annually to 
entering freshmen. Awards are renewable for up to four years 
of undergraduate study, dependent on maintaining academic 
standards set for the awards and satisfactory performance in 
an area of study for awards restricted by discipline. 



32 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



A single application, available from the Financial Aid 
Office and due in early January, provides consideration for 
each of the following Merit Awards Program awards: 

Merit Award Scholarships 

Alumni Scholarship: The Alumni Association established 
these unrestricted annual awards to provide assistance to stu- 
dents of merit (approximately four are awarded per year). 

Hazel Nixon Brown Scholarship: These awards are made to 
incoming freshmen who intend to major in Nursing. Prefer- 
ence is given to North Carolina students from Surry or Yadkin 
Counties. 

Bank of America Scholarship: These awards give prefer- 
ence to students interested in business careers and include a 
$2500 study abroad stipend. 

Board of Visitors Chancellor's Scholarships: These are unre- 
stricted annual awards made available through gifts from the 
UNCG Board of Visitors. 

Kathleen Price and Joseph M. Bryan Scholarship: Joseph 
M. Bryan established these funds in 1984 for undergraduate 
study in the Joseph M. Bryan School of Business and Econom- 
ics and each includes a $2500 study abroad stipend. 

Ethel Virginia Butler Centennial Scholarship: Awards are 
made from a bequest from alumna Ethel Virginia Butler, a for- 
mer teacher and long-time manager of the University Book- 
store (approximately ten awarded per year). 

Class of 1942 Centennial Scholarship: Funds for this schol- 
arship were established by members of the Class of 1942 in 
honor of the fiftieth anniversary of their commencement, and 
the University's centennial year (approximately one awarded 
every four years). 

Class of 1944 Scholarship: Endowed by the Class of 1944 in 
1994 to attract students with demonstrated leadership skills 
and academic excellence (approximately one awarded each 
year). 

Class of 1945 Centennial Scholarship: Established in 1995 
by the Class of 1945 to assist female students who have an 
interest in human relations, international studies, or women's 
studies (approximately one awarded per year). 

Class of 1951 Merit Scholarship: Made available through 
gifts from the Class of 1951. 

Class of 1970 Scholarship: Created by the Class of 1970 
in celebration of their 25th Anniversary (approximately one 
awarded per year). 

May Mebane Donoho Scholarship: An unrestricted award 
made possible through a gift from May M. Donoho, Class of 
1930. 

Carol Jean Eiserer Memorial Scholarship: The Eiserer Memo- 
rial Scholarship provides out-of-state tuition, fees, and a par- 
tial amount for on-campus room and board for a graduate 
of the Montgomery County Public Schools in Maryland who 
plans to major in Exercise and Sport Science (awarded once 
every four years). 

The Marguerite Felton and Guita Marble Scholarship in Chem- 
istry: This scholarship was established in 2000 in honor of two 
esteemed professors of Chemistry, Ms. Marguerite Felton and 
Dr. Guita Marble, for study in chemistry. 

James S. and Frances C. Ferguson Scholarship: This award, 
made to an outstanding out-of-state student, was established 
in 1978 to honor Dr. and Mrs. James S. Ferguson. 



Fiftieth Class Reunion Scholarship: Awards are made pos- 
sible through on-going class gifts given by alumni on the 
occasion of the 50th anniversary of their graduation from the 
University (approximately two awarded per year). 

The Marian Wliite Fisher, M.D. Centennial Scholarship: 
Awards are made possible by a bequest of Freida White 
McGirt in memory of her daughter, Dr. Marion White Fisher, 
'39 (approximately two awarded per year). 

The Jefferson-Pilot Scholarship: In 1961, the Jefferson- 
Pilot Life Corporation of Greensboro established this annual 
award (approximately one awarded per year). 

Elizabeth Louisa "Libby" Jones Scholarship: This annual 
award is given to students majoring in one of the sciences 
(mathematics, computer science, chemistry, or physics). 

Jaylee Montague Mead Merit Scholarship: This award is 
given to students majoring in any field within the College of 
Arts and Sciences. 

Beverly C. Moore Scholarship: This unrestricted award, 
made possible by a gift from the Moore family, is awarded 
approximately every two years. 

L. Richardson and Emily Preyer Scholarship: This unre- 
stricted annual award was established in 1991 to aid an out- 
standing undergraduate student (approximately one awarded 
per year). 

Katharine Smith Reynolds Scholarship: Awards are made 
possible by the Z. Smith Reynolds foundation of Winston- 
Salem for North Carolina residents. Reynolds Scholars receive 
two $1,250 stipends for community service involvement and 
an internship. They also receive a $2,500 stipend for study 
abroad. Approximately ten awards are made each year. 

Harry B. and Edith V Sloan Memorial Scholarship in Science, 
Mathematics, and Health: Endowed in 1997 for students inter- 
ested in pursuing study in health, the sciences, or the math- 
ematical sciences (approximately one awarded every four 
years). 

Deans' Scholars Program 

The Deans' Scholars Program offers incoming freshmen 
four-year renewable scholarships ranging from $1,000 to 
$3,000 annually. This competitive program emphasizes aca- 
demic rigor demonstrated by the completion of Advanced 
Placement (AP), honors, and college level courses while in 
high school. Interested students should complete a Merit 
Awards Application by the stated application deadline. 

Community College Presidents' Scholarship 

These two-year renewable scholarships are awarded to 
students transferring from local community colleges, based 
on the nomination of their community college president. For 
a complete listing of participating community colleges, con- 
tact the Financial Aid Office at your community college. 

Other Grants and Scholarships 

Federal and state funds are available for grant and schol- 
arship awards to students with exceptional financial need. A 
grant or scholarship is gift assistance and does not require 
repayment. Students who complete the financial aid applica- 
tion procedures are considered for all grant funds for which 
they are eligible. 

For a complete listing of grants and scholarships avail- 
able at UNCG, visit our Web site at http://fia.uncg.edu. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



33 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



Federal Pell Grants 

The Federal Pell Grant program assists undergraduate 
students in meeting postsecondary educational expenses. 
The program provides eligible students in need of financial 
assistance with federal funds to help pay for their first bac- 
calaureate degree. Students who already hold a baccalaureate 
degree and are pursuing a second baccalaureate degree are 
not eligible for a Federal Pell Grant. 

A Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) 
must be filed to determine Federal Pell Grant and other need- 
based aid eligibility before an award can be made by UNCG 
Ineligibility for a Federal Pell Grant may not affect eligibility 
for other types of aid at UNCG. A student must reapply each 
year for a Federal Pell Grant, and the amount of the grant may 
vary from year to year. 

North Carolina Student Incentive Grants 

A North Carolina resident full-time undergraduate stu- 
dent with exceptional financial need may be eligible for a 
state grant of $700. Students who wish to be considered for 
this grant must file the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) each year and give the U.S. Dept. of Education 
permission to send the financial information to the State. The 
deadline for applying is March 15, but application as soon 
after January 1 as possible is encouraged. Those subject to 
tuition surcharge may become ineligible for funds. 

Incentive Scholarship and Grant Program for Native 
Americans 

North Carolina residents who are members of an Indian 
tribe recognized by the State of North Carolina or by the fed- 
eral government may be eligible for a need-based grant or 
merit scholarship through this State-funded program. Con- 
tact the Financial Aid Office for eligibility requirements and 
application procedures. 

North Carolina Teaching Fellows 

(www.teachingfellows.org) 

Four-year awards of up to $6,500 per year are made to 
high school seniors who are promising prospective teach- 
ers. Financial need is not a selection criterion. For each year 
a student receives an award, he or she is expected to teach 
one year in North Carolina. The application deadline is in 
November and awards are announced in April. Applications 
are available from high school counselors and the NCTF 
Commission, Koger Center, Cumberland Bldg., 3739 National 
Dr., Suite 100, Raleigh, NC 27612, phone: 919/781-6833, 
e-mail: tfellows@ncforum.org. 

Prospective Teacher Scholarship/Loan 

North Carolina residents who plan a teaching career in the 
state may apply for a Prospective Teacher Scholarship/ Loan. 
High school seniors who apply must have a minimum SAT 
score of 900 and a minimum GPA of 3.0. College applicants 
must have a minimum GPA of 3.0. The award is valued at up 
to $2,500 per year, and each year's stipend may be canceled 
by a year of public school teaching in North Carolina. Infor- 
mation and applications may be obtained from high school 
guidance counselors, college financial aid offices, schools of 
education, and at the Web site at www.cfnc.org. Applications 
are due in mid-February Awards are announced in May. 



Nurse Scholars Program 

Awards are available to North Carolina residents with 
strong academic records. Students contract to work as full- 
time registered nurses within the state after graduation or 
they must repay the amount they are awarded plus interest at 
the rate of 10%. Students should contact the School of Nurs- 
ing to be nominated for this award and for further informa- 
tion on the program. 

Nurse Education Scholarship/Loan 

The loans are awarded to North Carolina students, with 
preference given to juniors and seniors in nursing degree pro- 
grams. Recipients are selected on the basis of financial need 
and merit by the Financial Aid Office. Loans may be repaid 
through full-time employment as a nurse in North Carolina 
or through repayment at a 10% interest rate. 

Loans 

UNCG offers loan assistance through the programs listed 
below to graduate and undergraduate students. Students are 
considered for loan assistance when they complete the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The Financial 
Aid Office determines loan eligibility from the program that is 
most suitable to the student's circumstances. When receiving 
a loan, the student must sign a promissory note. Students are 
encouraged to manage their loan debt load and to be aware of 
debt levels when they receive additional loans. 

Short-term loans for emergency expenses of up to $700 
are available through the Financial Aid Office during the 
time students are enrolled. Contact the Financial Aid Office 
regarding the terms and conditions applicable to the Emer- 
gency Loan Program. 

Federal Student Aid Loans 

All students who are U.S. citizens or permanent resi- 
dents, regularly admitted to UNCG, and who are enrolled 
at least half-time are eligible to be considered for assistance 
through the Federal Student Aid Loan Program. Repayment 
on Student Aid loans normally begins six months after the 
borrower graduates or terminates half-time enrollment. 

The two types of Federal Student Aid Loans are Subsi- 
dized and Unsubsidized. The Subsidized loan is awarded 
on the basis of financial need. The federal government pays 
the interest on this loan until repayment begins and during 
authorized periods of deferment. The Unsubsidized loan 
is not awarded on the basis of need. Interest accrues on the 
Unsubsidized loan from the time the loan is disbursed until 
it is paid in full. Interest may be paid as it accumulates, or 
may be added to the loan principal (capitalized). The FAFSA 
determines your eligibility for each type of loan. 

For the Subsidized Student Aid loan, annual borrow- 
ing is limited to $3,500 for freshmen, $4,500 for sophomores, 
$5,500 for juniors and seniors, and $8,500 for graduate study. 
Total Subsidized loan assistance at the undergraduate level 
may not exceed $23,000. The aggregate limit for Subsidized 
Student Aid loans through the graduate level is $65,500. 

Independent students, including graduate students, or 
dependent students whose parents are unable to get a PLUS 
Loan (see below) may be eligible to borrow additional monies 
under the Federal Unsubsidized Student Aid Loan Program. 
Freshmen and sophomores may be eligible to borrow an addi- 



34 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Expenses, Payments, Refunds, Financial Aid 



tional $4,000, upperclassmen an additional $5,000, and gradu- 
ate students may be eligible to borrow an additional $12,000 
in Unsubsidized Student Aid loans. 

Tbe interest rate on Student Aid loans is variable if your 
loan is disbursed on or after July 1, 1994. Tbe variable rate is 
adjusted each year and will never exceed 8.25%. 

Federal regulations govern the Federal Student Aid 
Loan program, including but not limited to eligibility criteria, 
entrance and exit interviews, and fund disbursement. 

Federal PLUS Loans 

This federal government program allows parents of 
dependent students to borrow to meet educational expenses. 
These loans are available in addition to the Federal Student 
Aid Loans up to the cost of attendance. The Federal PLUS 
program provides nonsubsidized loans at a variable interest 
rate that is not to exceed 9%. The amount borrowed under 
this program may not exceed the cost of education minus 
other aid received. Repayment usually begins 60 days after 
the loan is disbursed. 

Federal Perkins Loans 

Students with exceptional need may be eligible for a Fed- 
eral Perkins Loan. The interest rate on the Perkins loan is 5%. 
Repayment is made to the school, and normally begins nine 
months after the borrower graduates, leaves school, or drops 
below half-time enrollment. UNCG will automatically con- 
sider any student who files the FAFSA for the Perkins Loan. 

North Carolina Student Loans for Health, Science and 
Mathematics 

Legal residents of North Carolina accepted as full-time 
students in accredited associate, baccalaureate, master's, or 
doctoral programs leading to a degree in health, mathemat- 
ics, nursing, or science may be eligible for this type of loan. 
Maximum loans range from $3,000 to $8,500 depending on 
the degree level. Recipients are selected according to major, 
academic capabilities, and financial need. 

Interested students should request information and 
applications as soon as possible after January 15 from the 
North Carolina Student Loan Program for Health, Science, 
and Mathematics, PO Box 13223, Research Triangle Park, NC 
27709, telephone: 919/549-8614. 

Research Assistantships 

The Office of Undergraduate Research offers undergrad- 
uate research assistantships for highly motivated undergrad- 
uate students to work closely with a faculty member on his/ 
her research, scholarship, or creative activity. Assistantships 
are limited to rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors with 30 
hours or more at UNCG and a cumulative UNCG GPA rec- 
ommended minimum of 2.7. Part-time students who meet all 
criteria are eligible. Faculty and students in all disciplines are 
encouraged to participate. Awards are competitive. Faculty 
nominate students in early spring and awards are announced 
in late spring. Funds are available for the summer, one semes- 
ter, or for an academic year. For more information, go to the 
Office of Undergraduate Research Web site at www.uncg. 
edu/our. 



Student Employment 

Funds for part-time jobs are provided for in the budgets 
of various departments on campus and also by the federal 
government. All student employees of UNCG, upon being 
hired, must present proper documentation verifying their 
identity and employment eligibility as required by the Fed- 
eral Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. 

Original documentation must be presented on or before 
the first day of work. A list of acceptable documents can be 
found on the Student Employment Web site at: 

http://csc.dept.uncg.edu 

Federal Work-Study Program 

The federal government provides funds for part-time 
on- and off-campus jobs for students through the Federal 
Work-Study Program. The average student job requires 10 to 
15 hours per week. To be considered for Work-Study, a stu- 
dent need only complete the FAFSA and indicate interest in 
student employment on the form. Federal Work-Study is a 
need-based program with limited funding. Not all students 
who indicate interest will be offered Work-Study. 

Other On-Campus Employment 

Part-time jobs on campus are available for students who 
do not qualify for Federal Work-Study and want to earn 
money for a portion of their college expenses. The Career Ser- 
vices Center, located in the Elliott University Center on the 
UNCG campus, maintains a listing of these jobs. Students are 
eligible to use the Career Services Center as soon as they have 
been accepted for Admission. 

Financial Aid from Other Sources 
North Carolina Services for the Blind 

Services for the Blind, a state agency affiliated with the 
North Carolina Department of Human Resources, provides 
financial assistance to visually impaired/blind college stu- 
dents for such items as tuition, fees, books, supplies, and 
reader services. For information, contact the Chief of Reha- 
bilitation Services, Division of Services for the Blind, 309 Ashe 
Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27606. 

North Carolina Veterans Scholarships 

The Department of Veterans Affairs offers scholarship 
assistance to North Carolina children of deceased or disabled 
veterans or of certain veterans who were listed as POW or 
MIA status. An eligible student should write to the N.C. Divi- 
sion of Veterans Affairs, 325 N. Salisbury Street, Raleigh, NC 
27603, for information. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Program 

Many states offer educational assistance to students who 
have a mental or physical disability that is an impairment to 
employment. North Carolina residents should contact their 
local Vocational Rehabilitation office or the N.C. Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation Services, P.O. Box 26053, 805 Rug- 
gles Drive, Raleigh, NC 27611-6053. 

Students from other states should contact a local voca- 
tional counselor. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



35 



4. Academic Regulations & 

Policies 



Several UNCG offices support the implementation of 
academic processes, policies, regulations, and related activi- 
ties. 

Office of Orientation and Family Programs 
245 Elliott University Center • 336/334-5231 
www.uncg.edu/ori 

New undergraduates and their families are welcomed 
by a number of programs designed to assist with their tran- 
sition into the UNCG community. The Office of Orientation 
and Family Programs coordinates these programs. Orienta- 
tion activities include academic advising and registration for 
classes along with tours of the campus and campus resource 
fairs. French, Latin, and Spanish language placement exams 
are also given at this time. 

New students entering UNCG in the fall semester must 
participate in the summer SOAR program (Spartan Orienta- 
tion, Advising, and Registration), which occurs in June and 
August. New students are also expected to participate in 
Rawkin' Welcome Week, which takes place the week prior to 
the beginning of classes in the fall. 

University Registrar's Office (URO) 
180 Mossman Building • 336/334-5946 
www.uncg.edu/reg 

The Office of the University Registrar oversees adher- 
ence to academic policy and data integrity, and is responsible 
for the registration of all students in academic credit courses 
offered by the University. All aspects of registration, includ- 
ing the preparation of this Bulletin, the semester schedule of 
courses, demographic updates, major changes and faculty 
advisor assignments, registration scheduling and processing 
are handled by this office. In connection with registration, the 
University Registrar's Office is also responsible for grade pro- 
cessing at the close of each semester, and maintains the offi- 
cial academic records (transcripts) for all current and former 
students. Also see chapter 8. 

This office also provides summer session credit approval 
for UNCG students, and transfer credit evaluation for stu- 
dents transferring into the University. 

Additionally, the University Registrar's Office coordi- 
nates the development and oversight of the CAPP (Curricu- 
lum, Advising, and Program Planning) automated degree 
audit system that monitors student progress toward degree 
completion, oversees the graduation application process and 
graduation clearance for undergraduates, the printing of 
diplomas, and commencement activities in May and Decem- 
ber of each year. 

Student Academic Services (SAS) 
159 Mossman Building • 336/334-5730 
www.uncg.edu/adv 

The Office of Student Academic Services provides aca- 
demic advising for undergraduate students, and administers 
undergraduate policies and regulations. 



A staff of academic advisors is available in the Office of 
Student Academic Services from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday 
through Friday, to answer questions and to assist students 
with academic matters beyond the scope of the faculty advi- 
sor. Please refer to chapter 8 for a description of services 
offered by the office. 

The Director of the Office of Student Academic Services 
is responsible for the monitoring of University Undergradu- 
ate academic regulations as described on the following pages. 
Any student with questions concerning academic regulations 
should address them to the staff in the Office of Student Aca- 
demic Services. 

In addition to academic advising, Student Academic Ser- 
vices coordinates a number of academic success initiatives 
such as UNS 101— University Studies, the first-year experi- 
ence course and SAS 100— Strategies for Academic Success, 
the program required for students who are placed on aca- 
demic probation. 

A number of services for students are provided by Stu- 
dent Academic Services via the Web at: 

www.uncg.edu/adv 

Student Success Center 
110 Mclver • 336/334-7533 
http://success.uncg.edu 

The Student Success Center currently houses three differ- 
ent but related academic support service units complement- 
ing the efforts of the teaching faculty through personalized 
and structured approaches to learning which include tutor- 
ing, academic counseling, preparation for graduate school 
entrance exams, computer instruction, skills development, 
and workshops. The Learning Assistance Center (LAC) pro- 
vides programs and services to help undergraduate students 
improve their academic performance and achieve their edu- 
cational goals. Special Support Services (SSS) is a compre- 
hensive educational support program sponsored by the U.S. 
Department of Education and UNCG, providing free services 
to first-generation undergraduate students in a supportive 
and caring atmosphere that enables them to achieve high lev- 
els of academic success at UNCG. The Supplemental Instruc- 
tion (SI) Program is an academic support area that targets 
historically difficult courses. SI is a non-remedial approach to 
learning enrichment that increases student performance and 
retention. Students enrolled in Si-identified courses attend 
regularly scheduled, out-of-class review/discussion sessions. 
The sessions are focused on reviewing lecture notes, discuss- 
ing course readings, and preparing for examinations. See 
chapter 8 for a complete description of the Student Success 
Center. 



36 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Regulations 



The Academic Integrity Policy 

First responsibility for academic integrity lies with indi- 
vidual students and faculty members of the UNCG commu- 
nity. A violation of academic integrity is an act harmful to all 
other students, faculty and, ultimately, the entire community. 
Specific information on the Academic Integrity Policy and 
obligations of faculty and students may be found online at 
http://academicintegrity.uncg.edu. Names of College and 
School members of the Academic Integrity Advisory Group 
may be found online at this site as well as under the link "Aca- 
demic Integrity at UNCG/Resources for Faculty." The Admin- 
istrative Coordinator for Academic Integrity can be reached 
at 336/334-5514. 

Declaring or Changing Majors 

Notification of the University Registrar's Office or the 
College/School/Departmental office is required when a stu- 
dent declares or changes his/her major. 

Declaring a Major 

Many students declare their majors when they are 
accepted into the University or during their orientation pro- 
grams, before they initially register for courses. Those who 
enter the University with an "undecided" major should 
declare their majors prior to the completion of 45 semester 



hours. To earn a degree in a timely manner, several academic 
departments recommend that students declare their major 
even earlier in their academic careers. Students should con- 
tact the department of their intended major for further infor- 
mation. 

Changing a Major 

Students planning to change their majors should do so 
well in advance of the next registration period in order to be 
assigned to a new advisor and to receive adequate advising in 
the department or advising center of their new majors. 

Students should declare or change their majors by the 
end of September for spring semester registration in the new 
major, and by the end of February for fall semester registra- 
tion in the new major. 



Registering for Courses 

Dates for advising and registration periods for each 
semester are published in the University's Academic Calen- 
dar, pp. 2-3 of this Bulletin, in each semester's Registration 
Guide, and on the University Registrar's Web site (www.uncg. 
edu/reg). It is the student's responsibility to be aware of all 
registration and advising periods. Registration for courses at 
UNCG is an automated process conducted through UNCG- 
enie, UNCG's student information system, which provides 
students with Web registration access. 



Summary of Undergraduate Academic Requirements and Limits 



Baccalaureate Degree Requirements and Limits 

122 Minimum number of hours required for an undergraduate 

degree 
36 Minimum number of hours required toward the degree at or 

above the 300 course level 
31 Minimum required hours in residence at UNCG 
31 Minimum required hours in residence at UNCG beyond the 

first degree for a second undergraduate degree 
2.0 Minimum cumulative GPA required for graduation 

Credit Hour Regulations and Limits 

12 Minimum number of credit or semester hours in which un- 
dergraduates must enroll per semester to qualify for full-time 
status 
19 Maximum number of hours per semester in which an under- 
graduate may enroll without special permission 
64 Maximum number of hours allowed for 2-year transfer credit 
8 Maximum number of hours allowed for physical education 

credit 
1 2 Maximum number of hours allowed for Army ROTC credit 
12 Maximum number of hours allowed for Air Force ROTC credit 

Non-Credit Courses 

The courses listed below do not count toward graduation nor 
are they calculated in the student's GPA. 
SAS 100, SAS200 

Undergraduate Classifications 

0-29.9 hours completed Freshman 

30-59.9 hours completed Sophomore 

60-89.9 hours completed Junior 

90 or more hours completed Senior 



Deans' List Qualifications 

6 Minimum number of hours a student must have completed at 

UNCG to be eligible for Deans' List 

6 Minimum number of hours in which a student must be en- 

rolled for a given semester 

3.50 Minimum required GPA for the semester 

B- Minimum grade earned for the semester (no grade may be 
lower than B-) 

Chancellor's List Qualifications 

30 Minimum number of hours a student must have completed at 
UNCG to be eligible for Chancellor's List 

12 Minimum number of hours in which a student must be en- 
rolled for a given semester at UNCG 
3.65 Minimum required cumulative GPA 

Transfer students must be enrolled for at least one semester at 
UNCG to be eligible for the Chancellor's List. 

Graduation with Honors Requirements 

45 Minimum number of hours a student must complete in 

residence at UNCG by end of senior year to be eligible for 
graduation with honors 

3.90 Minimum required GPA for Summa cum laude 

3.70 Minimum required GPA for Magna cum laude 

3.50 Minimum required GPA for Cum laude 

Second Degree Honors Required Hours 

45 Minimum number of hours a second degree candidate must 
complete toward the second degree in residence at UNCG, 
with the required GPA, to be eligible for graduation with honors 

Simultaneous Baccalaureate Degrees Residency Hours 

31 Minimum number of hours in residence a student must 
complete beyond requirements for the first degree in order to 
receive a second, simultaneous baccalaureate degree 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



37 



Academic Regulations 



Registration Process 

New Freshman students register for courses during the 
summer orientation programs (SOAR) or after the completion 
of their orientation programs at the beginning of a semester. 

Transfer, Former, or unclassified students receive reg- 
istration instructions by e-mail before the beginning of each 
semester's registration period. 

Continuing students, those currently enrolled in UNCG 
who are returning for another semester of work, receive 
instructions by e-mail for registering during the Early Reg- 
istration periods in November (for spring semester) and in 
April (for summer/fall semester). Continuing students eligi- 
ble to pre-register for the next semester who do not do so, will 
be required to pay a late registration fee. 

Inter-institutional Registration 

UNCG students desiring to take courses at one of the 
Greater Greensboro Consortium schools or one of the North 
Carolina Inter-institutional schools should obtain a Consor- 
tium form from the University Registrar's Office, 180 Moss- 
man Building, 336/334-5646. 

UNCG students desiring to take an online course through 
one of the UNC system schools should make this request 
through The University of North Carolina Online Web site, 
http://online.northcarolina.edu/index.php. 

Advising Codes 

All undergraduates are required to meet each semester 
with their faculty advisors for assistance with course selec- 
tion and to obtain semester advising codes. New advising 
codes are issued for the next semester during the advising 
period. Undergraduates must use advising codes to access 
the UNCGenie registration system, throughout the semester 
for schedule adjustment. 



Course Selection 

Course Loads 

Twelve semester hours is considered full-time status for 
undergraduates. An undergraduate student must be enrolled 
for a minimum of 12 hours to qualify for full-time certification 
to any organization. 

Full-time undergraduates normally take five courses 
per semester. Since a majority of courses carry three hours 
of credit with some carrying four hours of credit, a normal 
course load is 15 or 16 hours per semester. To complete most 
undergraduate degrees in four years, students should plan to 
carry 15 or 16 hours per semester. 

Undergraduates may not take more than 19 hours per 
semester except with the approval of Student Academic Ser- 
vices. Students who have cumulative grade point averages 
of 3.0 may be authorized, in special circumstances and at the 
discretion of the Director of Student Academic Services, to 
carry a maximum of 21 hours of course work. 

Suggested Academic Workload Guidelines 

Students should be aware that academic excellence and 
scholastic achievement usually require a significant invest- 
ment of time in study, research, and out-of-class projects. To 
provide guidance to students in planning their academic and 
work schedules, the following recommendations are offered: 



1. In general, students should plan to devote between 
2-3 hours outside of class for each hour in class. 
Thus, students with a 15-hour course load should 
schedule between 30-45 hours weekly for complet- 
ing outside-of-class reading, study, and homework " 
assignments. 

2. Students who are employed more than 5-10 hours 
each week should consider reducing their course 
loads (semester hours), depending upon their study 
habits, learning abilities, and course work require- 
ments. 

Course Levels 

Course level numbers are structured as follows: 

100-199 intended primarily for freshmen 

200-299 intended primarily for sophomores 

300-399 intended primarily for juniors 

400-499 intended primarily for seniors 

500-599 intended for advanced undergraduates 

and graduate students; these courses are 

not open to freshmen and sophomores 
600-749 registration restricted to students who are 

classified as graduate students 
750-799 registration restricted to students admitted 

to doctoral programs 
The Undergraduate Bulletin lists complete course descrip- 
tions for courses numbered 100 through 599. Please see The 
Graduate School Bulletin for information on 600- and 700-level 
graduate courses. 

Adding Courses 

Students may add courses to their schedules during the 
Drop/ Add period. Between the end of the Drop/Add period 
and the 10th day of classes, a student desiring to add a course 
may do so only with the written approval of the instructor. 

Late Adds 

After the 10th day of classes, adding with 
instructor permission will be accepted by the 
University Registrar's Office only under extraor- 
dinary circumstances. 

Course Drop Policy 

Approved by Faculty Senate, February 4, 2009; Approved by 
the Chancellor, April 2, 2009. 

Dropping Current Term Courses 

Dropping a course or courses within the first eight weeks 
of the semester shall be without penalty and hours shall not 
be computed as hours attempted. 

Dropping a course or courses after the eight-week dead- 
line but before the end of the semester shall be without pen- 
alty when approved for appropriate cause as determined 
by appropriate documentation of medical, psychological, 
unanticipated life events, or administrative reasons. A stu- 
dent should initiate a request for course drop without penalty 
from one or more courses through the Office of Student Aca- 
demic Services. Courses of less than one semester's duration, 
including summer school courses, shall have shorter dead- 



38 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Regulations 



lines (proportional to the eight-week deadline for the regular 
semester) for dropping. These deadlines are published on the 
University Registrar's Web site. 

The Director of Student Academic Services shall be 
responsible for authorizing these drops after consultation 
with the instructor of every course, and with other depart- 
ments or agencies as needed. 

The grade W on the grade report and transcript indicates 
that the student either dropped the course within the eight- 
week, no-penalty period or that the student dropped at a later 
date for appropriate cause determined by medical, psycho- 
logical, unanticipated life events, or administrative reasons. 

If a student drops all courses, the student is considered 
officially withdrawn from the University. See section on With- 
drawal from the University. 

Dropping Courses Retroactively 

Students shall be given one year following the semester 
in which a course was taken to petition to drop the course 
retroactively. Students who seek to drop a course/courses 
retroactively must meet the conditions under "Dropping 
Current Term Courses" and the drop must be approved by 
the Director of Student Academic Services. In the event that 
the instructor is, for practical purposes, unavailable, only 
the Academic Appeals Committee of the Faculty Senate may 
act in place of the instructor in the matter of a retroactive 
course drop. 

Courses may not be dropped retroactively for students 
who have graduated. 

(for Retroactive Grade Change see Grading 
Policies and Grades below) 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students who find that they must withdraw from the 
University can do so by dropping all courses through the 
UNCGenie Web site at https://banweb.uncg.edu. Undergrad- 
uates who drop all courses are considered to be withdrawn 
from the University and must seek reactivation or readmis- 
sion through Undergraduate Admissions to return to school 
in subsequent terms. 

Students withdrawing on or before the last day to drop 
without academic penalty will receive W grades (withdrawal 
without academic penalty). Thereafter, WF grades will be 
recorded. WF grades are calculated in the student's GPA as F 
(failing) grades. 

Students who have questions regarding withdrawing 
from the University should contact Student Academic Ser- 
vices, 159 Mossman Building, 336/334-5730. Inquiries regard- 
ing returning to the University should be directed to the 
Undergraduate Admissions Office, 336/334-5243. For addi- 
tional information go to www.uncg.edu/reg/Reg/current/ 
withdrawal.html. 



Withdrawal/Refund/Re-enrollment Policy for 
Students Activated for Military Duty including the 
Armed Services Reserve and the National Guard 

Students who serve in the Armed Services Reserve or the 
National Guard are often alerted that they may be called to 
active duty for various reasons. If a student is involuntarily 
called for active military duty during a term in which he or 
she is enrolled, the eligible student may elect one of several 
options for withdrawing from the University, including com- 
plete withdrawal with fully refundable tuition and general 
fees, an early exam option, or an Incomplete grade option. 
See chapter 3 for complete details of UNCG's Refund Policy 
for Students Activated for Military Duty, including policies 
regarding returning to the University after release from active 
duty. 



Auditing Courses 

Full-time UNCG students may audit courses upon the 
written approval of the instructor. Auditors must register offi- 
cially for the class. Attendance, preparation, and participation 
in the classroom discussion and laboratory exercises shall be 
at the discretion of the instructor. An auditor is not required 
to take examinations and tests and receives no credit for the 
course. 

Registration may not be changed from audit to credit or 
from credit to audit status after the end of late registration. 

Regulations regarding visiting auditors and part-time 
auditing students are found in chapter 2. For auditing fees, 
see chapter 3. 



Class Attendance 

Regular class attendance is a responsibility and a privi- 
lege of university education. It is fundamental to the orderly 
acquisition of knowledge. Students should recognize the 
advantages of regular class attendance, accept it as a personal 
responsibility, and apprise themselves of the consequences of 
poor attendance. Instructors should stress the importance of 
these responsibilities to students, set appropriate class atten- 
dance policies for their classes, and inform students of their 
requirements in syllabi and orally at the beginning of each 
term. 

Student's Responsibility 

1. Knowledge of each instructor's attendance policy and 
monitoring his or her class absences throughout the 
term. 

2. Familiarity with all materials covered in each course 
during absences and make-up of any work required by 
the instructor. 

3. Initiation of requests to make-up work missed because 
of class absences. The decision to assist the student with 
make-up work, including tests, rests with the instructor. 

4. Follow-up on all notices from the Registrar regarding 
course enrollment in order to correct registration. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



39 



Academic Regulations 



Instructor's Responsibility 

1. Setting of reasonable regulations for class attendance as 
appropriate for class content, organization, methodol- 
ogy, and size. 

2. Description of attendance policies in course syllabi and 
announcement in class, particularly at the beginning of 
each term. 

3. Maintenance of class attendance records of enrolled 
students as appropriate for the attendance policy. 

4. Exaction of penalties for unsatisfactory class attendance. 
Possible penalties are lowering the course grade, includ- 
ing a grade of F, and, in extreme circumstances, drop- 
ping the student from the course. 

Appeals 

If a student thinks there is a discrepancy between the 
instructor's exaction of a penalty for unsatisfactory class 
attendance and the stated policy or that there is an extenu- 
ating circumstance that may affect the instructor's decision, 
then he or she should first make a request to the instructor. 
If desired, the student may further appeal to the Department 
Head, the Dean of the School or College, and the Provost, in 
that order. 

Grading Policies and Grades 

Final Course Examinations 

Final examinations may be required at the discretion of 
faculty and must be scheduled in course syllabi with informa- 
tion available to students on the first day of class. 

Change of Examination Schedule 

A student desiring to change the meeting time of a final 
exam should make the request directly to the class instruc- 
tor. It is the instructor's prerogative to grant such requests. In 
instances where students have three exams within a 24-hour 
period, they may apply to the University Registrar's Office, 
180 Mossman Building, for permission to change their exam 
schedules. The usual process is to change the middle exami- 
nation in a sequence of three. All requests for changes in 
examinations must be filed with the University Registrar's 
Office before Reading Day. 

Grade Reports 

Final course grades are made available to students at the 
end of each semester on UNCGenie, UNCG's student infor- 
mation system. Students can view and print copies of their 
grades from UNCGenie at https://banweb.uncg.edu. 

Grades 

A grade in a course is based on the quality of the stu- 
dent's classroom and written work throughout the semester. 
Most course grades are not solely based on the final examina- 
tion alone. 

If a course or its equivalent is taken more than once for 
credit and is not repeatable for credit, credit will be applied 
toward degree requirements only once. 



UNCG Grading System for Undergraduates 

A Excellent— indicates achievement of distinction 

and excellence in several if not all of the following 
aspects: 1) completeness and accuracy of knowl- 
edge; 2) intelligent use of knowledge; 3) indepen- 
dence of work; 4) originality. 

B Good— indicates general achievement superior to 

the acceptable standard defined as C. It involves 
excellence in some aspects of the work, as indicated 
in the definition of A. 

C Average— indicates the acceptable standard for 

graduation from UNCG. It involves such quality 
and quantity of work as may fairly be expected of a 
student of normal ability who gives to the course a 
reasonable amount of time, effort, and attention. 
Such acceptable standards should include the fol- 
lowing factors: 1) familiarity with the content of 
the course; 2) familiarity with the methods of study 
of the course; 3) full participation in the work of the 
class; 4) ability to write about the subject in intel- 
ligible English. 

D Lowest Passing Grade— indicates work that falls 

below the acceptable standards defined as C but 
which is of sufficient quality and quantity to be 
counted in the hours of graduation if balanced by 
superior work in other courses. 

F Failure— indicates failure that may not be made up 

except by repeating the course. 

I Incomplete— indicates that the completion of some 

part of the work for the course has been deferred 
because of prolonged illness of the student or 
because of some serious circumstances beyond the 
student's control. 

Concomitantly with the recording of an Incom- 
plete grade, the instructor files with the head of 
the school or department concerned the student's 
average grade and the specific work that must 
be accomplished before the Incomplete can be 
removed. Incomplete grades may be recommended 
by the University physician, the Counseling and 
Testing Center, and by the Director of Student 
Academic Services. Also see section "Removal of 
Incompletes." 

IP In Progress— indicates that the course work was 

planned to continue beyond a single semester. 

P/NP Passing/Not Passing— used for designated courses 
only; courses graded P/NP are so indicated in the 
course description. 

SP Special Exam 

W Withdrawal — indicates a course from which the 

student withdrew during the first eight (8) weeks of 
classes; no academic penalty is attached to a grade 
of W; see also the section on "Dropping Courses." 

WF Withdrawal with Failure— indicates a course from 

which the student withdrew after the first eight (8) 
weeks of classes; a WF is computed in the student's 
GPA; see also the section on "Dropping Courses." 

WN Withdrawal Not Passing— used in courses desig- 
nated P/NP. 

NC No Credit— indicates an audited course. 



40 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Regulations 



Removal of Incomplete Grade 

An Incomplete grade may be removed by completion 
of the deferred work. A student should not reregister for the 
course in order to remove the Incomplete. An Incomplete 
received during a semester or in summer session must be 
removed within six months from the last day of examinations 
in the term in which the course was taken. Current deadlines 
for removals of Incompletes are published below, each semes- 
ter in the Registration Guide, and on the University Registrar's 
Web site at www.uncg.edu/reg. 

An Incomplete not removed within this time limit is 
automatically converted to an F by the University Registrar. 
A graduating senior who incurs an Incomplete and who has 
completed all requirements and enough semester hour cred- 
its and grade points to graduate may do so even though the 
Incomplete grade is outstanding. If the Incomplete is not 
removed within the required six months, it will be converted 
to F at the end of that period of time. When an Incomplete is 
removed, it may be replaced by A, B, C, D, F, or, in certain 
designated courses, P, NP, S, or U. 

Incomplete Removal Deadlines 

Incomplete grades must be removed by the deadlines 
stated below or they will be automatically converted to F on 
the student's academic record. 

Spring 2009 

Incomplete grades earned during spring 2009 must be 
removed by November 13, 2009. 

Summer 2009 

Incomplete grades earned during summer 2009 must be 
removed by February 1, 2010. 

Fall 2009 

Incomplete grades earned during fall 2009 must be 
removed by June 16, 2010. 

Spring 2010 

Incomplete grades earned during spring 2010 must be 
removed by November 12, 2010. 

Summer 2010 

Incomplete grades earned during summer 2010 must be 
removed by January 31, 2011. 

Grade Appeal Policy 

If a student wishes to appeal an assigned grade, the stu- 
dent should first discuss the concerns with the instructor. If 
desired, the student may further appeal to the Department 
Head, the Dean of the School or College, and the Provost, in 
that order. 

The following amendment to the appeal policy was approved by 
the UNCG Faculty Senate on November 17, 2007. 

Grade Appeals will be considered only in the most excep- 
tional circumstances, and are approved only in cases where 
the evidence strongly supports the student's claim. Appeals 
must be filed no later than the first six months after the grade 
has posted. 

Examples that do merit a grade appeal include: 

• The instructor has miscalculated a final grade; 

• The instructor has violated the grading policies outlined 
in the syllabus without reasonable cause; 



• The instructor has not provided a reasonable explana- 
tion of how the student's work was evaluated. 
Examples that do not merit a grade appeal include: 

• The instructor's grading policies differ from other 
instructors in the Department, College/School, or Uni- 
versity. 

• The instructor's attendance policy differs from other 
instructors in the Department, College/School, or Uni- 
versity. 

• The instructor's Late Work policy differs from other 
instructors in the Department, College/School, or Uni- 
versity. 

• The grade distribution in the class in question is lower 
than in other sections of the same course. 

• The student's grade in the course is significantly lower 
than grades the student earned in similar courses. 

• The grade in question will trigger Probation, Suspen- 
sion, or loss of Financial Aid. 

Please note that simple disagreement about what constitutes 
fair grading is not grounds for an appeal. Department or School 
Handbooks and/or the Instructor's syllabus define standards for 
grading in that course. When a student elects to remain in a class 
after reading these materials, the student is understood to have 
accepted the grading terms for the course. The instructor is not obli- 
gated to deviate from grading standards outlined in the Department 
or School Handbooks and/or the syllabus. 

Semester Hour Credits 

Credits for all courses are reported in semester hours. A 
semester hour credit equals one 50-minute class period per 
week or its equivalent throughout one semester. The number 
of semester hour credits given for each course is listed as part 
of the course description. 

Grade Points and Grade Point Averages (GPA) 

UNCG uses a semester hour credit and grade point 
system for evaluating undergraduates. Semester hour cred- 
its represent the number of course hours completed. Grade 
points are determined by the number of semester hour credits 
attempted and the grades earned. 

The grade point average is determined by dividing the 
accumulated number of grade points earned by the accumu- 
lated number of semester hours undertaken. Hours attempted 
but not passed must be included in this calculation. However, 
a second F or WF in the same course is not used in computing 
the grade point average. Courses graded on the P/NP or S/U 
basis and courses transferred from another institution (except 
those courses taken through the Consortium and Inter-insti- 
tutional Registration) may not be used in determining the 
UNCG grade point average. 

SAS 100 and SAS 200 do not count toward graduation 
and therefore are not calculated in a student's GPA. 

Beginning with courses taken in fall 1996, plus/minus 
grades are incorporated into the GPA for all undergradu- 
ates. Effective fall 2006, the A+ is added to the scale, carrying 
4.3 quality points. The maximum grade point average for an 
undergraduate, however, will be capped at 4.0. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



41 



Academic Regulations 



Grade 



Grade Pts. Awarded 
Per Hour of Credit 



A+ 


4.3 


A 


4.0 


A- 


3.7 


B+ 


3.3 


B 


3.0 


B- 


2.7 


C+ 


2.3 


c 


2.0 


c- 


1.7 


D+ 


1.3 


D 


1.0 


D- 


0.7 


F/WF 


0.0 



Academic Renewal 

Tlie following policy was approved by the UNCG Faculty Sen- 
ate on October 2, 2002; amended October 23, 2006: 

Formerly enrolled students who have less than a 
2.0 cumulative GPA and who have not been enrolled 
in any institution of higher education during the pre- 
vious three years may apply for academic renewal; 
or, as an alternative, students who have less than a 
2.0 cumulative GPA may apply for academic renewal 
after completing 30 hours of UNCG-approved col- 
lege credit with a 2.50 GPA since their last enroll- 
ment at UNCG. 

All students readmitted/reactivated under the 
provisions of this policy must earn at least a 2.0 
GPA on their first 15 hours following re-enrollment 
to qualify for renewal. Thereafter, the student must 
meet the standard for continuation in the University 
academic good standing policy. Grades will be for- 
given only once during a student's career and cannot 
be reversed. 

Grade Forgiveness 

Upon meeting these requirements, all previously com- 
pleted courses in which grades below a C were earned will 
be forgiven. The grades of these courses will be shown on the 
transcript but will not be used in the calculation of the GPA 
and the hours will not be counted toward degree require- 
ments. The recomputed GPA will be calculated from the 
courses in which grades of C or higher were earned. Grades 
of C- (1.70 grade points) or below will not be counted toward 
degree requirements nor in the GPA. 

Grade Replacement Policy 

Except for courses with specific provision in the course 
description for repeated credit, a UNCG undergraduate stu- 
dent may repeat a UNCG course in an attempt to earn a bet- 
ter grade. Students may request that an original grade in a 
course be removed from the Grade Point Average (GPA) and 
replaced by the grade earned in the repeated course. Only 



300-level and below courses may be repeated. During their 
undergraduate careers students may request to replace the 
grades for a total of three courses, regardless of credit- or 
semester-hour value. For example, a student may replace a 
single course three times, or a combination thereof, not to 
exceed the limits of the policy. 

Students must initiate the request by filing a form with 
the University Registrar's Office to replace a grade. All grade 
replacements are final. The academic transcript will reflect all 
attempts and grades. Students cannot combine the Academic 
Renewal and the Grade Replacement policies. Grades earned 
as a result of Academic Integrity violations recorded by the 
Office of Student Affairs may not be replaced by another 
grade. Grades earned in repeated courses will not be used 
to replace grades earned as part of a degree once it has been 
conferred. 

In the case of all other repeated courses, attempted hours 
and grade points from all attempts will be counted fully in the 
GPA. Semester hours earned for the course will count only 
once in the total hours for the degree. Departmental policies 
supersede this policy. Grades can be replaced for courses 
taken fall 2005 and thereafter. 

Retroactive Grade Change 

A retroactive grade change is a change in an officially 
recorded grade. A grade becomes officially recorded when 
the Registrar so stipulates. Except to correct clerical errors or 
to resolve an incomplete grade (see "Removal of Incomplete 
Grade"), a retroactive grade change is an extraordinary action 
and is granted only in the most compelling circumstances. No 
change may occur unless the instructor who gave the grade 
initiates the formal process of a retroactive grade change. The 
change must also be approved by the instructor's department 
head and by the instructor's dean. 

Students who seek a retroactive grade change to a W are 
referred to the section on "Dropping Courses Retroactively" 
in the Course Drop policy. 

Retroactive grade changes are not made for students who 
have graduated. 

Deans' List 

Undergraduate students carrying six (6) or more semes- 
ter hours of course work graded on an A, B, C, D, or F basis are 
eligible for the Deans' List in the fall and spring semesters. 

Students who earn a grade point average of 3.50 or bet- 
ter and who have no grade below B- for the semester will 
be placed on the Deans' List. The list is compiled at the end 
of each semester or when a grade change is processed after 
a semester for all students whose grade point average falls 
within the range at the time the report is prepared. 

Recognition is accorded the recipients of this honor. Fall 
and spring semester Deans' Lists are published on the Uni- 
versity Registrar's Web site at www.uncg.edu/reg after all 
grades for the semester have been processed. 

Chancellor's List 

Students are eligible for the Chancellor's List who meet 
the following criteria: achievement of 30 or more hours at 
UNCG; a cumulative grade point average of 3.65 or higher; 
current enrollment at UNCG in 12 or more hours. In the case 
of transfer students, at least one semester of enrollment at 
UNCG is required. 



42 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Regulations 



Recognition is accorded the recipients of this honor. The 
Chancellor's List is published on the University Registrar's 
Web site at www.uncg.edu/reg after all grades for the fall and 
spring semesters have been processed. 

Classification of Students 

The following classifications became effective for fall 1996 
and thereafter for newly admitted undergraduates (transfer 
students and freshmen). 

Undergraduate students are classified as freshmen, 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors. These classifications are 
determined by the number of semester hours completed 
(including hours transferred from another institution). The 
classifications are as follows: 

Freshman 0-29.9 semester hours completed 

Sophomore 30-59.9 semester hours completed 

Junior 60-89.9 semester hours completed 

Senior 90 or more semester hours completed 

Academic Good Standing At UNCG 

The following requirements and procedures for main- 
taining academic good standing became effective in fall 1996 
for newly admitted degree-seeking undergraduates (fresh- 
men and transfer students), and was modified by Faculty 
Senate in April 1998. 

To continue in academic good standing at UNCG, stu- 
dents must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 1.75 
for freshmen (0-29 semester hours completed), and 2.0 there- 
after (30 or more semester hours completed). 

Students on academic probation must earn a 2.30 GPA 
each term including Summer Session until academic good 
standing is restored. For freshmen a 1.75 cumulative GPA 
is required for good standing; for sophomores and above, a 
2.0 cumulative GPA. Failure to meet the 2.30 term GPA until 
good standing is restored will result in academic suspension, 
if not previously suspended. Students on academic probation 
after academic suspension or dismissal who fail to meet the 
2.30 term GPA will be academically dismissed. 

UNCG reserves the right to deny enrollment to any stu- 
dent, even though the student has met the minimum grade 
point average required, if it is apparent from the student's 
academic record of required courses that the student will not 
be able to meet graduation requirements. 

The Academic Good Standing Policy applies to enroll- 
ment during any term, including Summer Session. Students 
may be placed on academic probation, suspended, dismissed, 
or restored to good standing based on their academic perfor- 
mance during Summer Session. Academic performance for 
both summer terms is evaluated at the end of summer term II. 
Students may check their academic standing via UNCGenie. 

Academic Probation 

Academic probation will occur as a result of any of the 
following: 

1. Freshmen will be placed on academic probation if 
their cumulative GPA falls below a 1.75. 

2. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors will be placed on 
academic probation if their cumulative GPA falls 
below a 2.0. 



3. Any full-time, degree-seeking student who fails to 
pass at least six (6) semester hours in a given semes- 
ter shall be placed on academic probation. 

Students on academic probation must earn a 2.30 term 
GPA each term to be eligible to continue until good standing 
is restored. 

Students who are placed on academic probation must 
participate in the Student Academic Success Program spon- 
sored by Student Academic Services during their next semes- 
ter. Failure to participate in this program or meet any con- 
dition of this program will result in immediate academic 
suspension. 

All students on academic probation shall be limited to a 
maximum of 12 semester hours in the fall or spring semester 
and no more than four (4) hours in each term of summer ses- 
sion. 

Students are expected to be aware at all times of their 
academic status and are responsible for knowing whether or 
not they are on academic probation. 

SAS Courses 

100 Strategies for Academic Success (0:2) 

• Enrollment required of, and restricted to, students who are placed 
on academic probation. 

• Attendance requirements enforced. 

• Graded P/NP (Pass/Not Pass) 

• Failure to register for SAS 100 and to attend the first class 
meeting will result in immediate academic suspension. If 
extraordinary circumstances prevent students from attending the 
first class meeting, they should contact the Program Coordinator 
in Student Academic Services prior to that meeting to avoid 
immediate suspension. 

Topics will include self-assessment, motivation, goal-setting, 
study skills, learning styles, time management, and campus 
resources. Students will develop and follow an individualized 
learning plan to address their particular challenges and needs. 
(Fall & Spring & Summer) 

200 Academic Success for Continuing Students (0:2) 

• Enrollment is required of, and restricted to, undergraduates 
who are placed on academic probation following any semester of 
academic good standing at UNCG. 

• Attendance requirements enforced. 

• Graded P/NP (Pass/Not Pass). 

• Failure to register for SAS 200 and to attend the first class 
meeting will result in immediate academic suspension. If 
extraordinary circumstances prevent students from attending the 
first class meeting, they should contact the Program Coordinator 
in Student Academic Services prior to that meeting to avoid 
immediate suspension. 

Course emphasizes building interdependent campus relation- 
ships; enhancing self-assessment, self-efficacy, and self-advocacy; 
and fostering academic and career goal setting. (Fall & Spring) 

Academic Suspension 

Academic suspension from the University will occur as a 
result of either of the following: 

1. Freshmen on academic probation will be sus- 
pended for one semester if they fail to earn either a 
minimum 2.30 GPA each term or raise their cumu- 
lative GPA to 1.75 at the end of their probationary 
term. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



43 



Academic Regulations 



2. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors on academic pro- 
bation will be suspended for one semester if they 
fail to earn either a minimum 2.30 GPA each term or 
raise their cumulative GPA to 2.0 at the end of the 
probationary term. 
Students placed on academic suspension are denied 
permission to enroll for one semester. After a one-semester 
academic suspension, students may apply for reactivation/ 
readmission to the University. Students are encouraged to 
complete an interview with a counselor in the Student Aca- 
demic Services Office prior to the application deadline. If 
reactivated, students will return carrying academic probation 
status. Summer Session is not considered a semester away for 
the purposes of academic suspension. 

Academic Suspension Appeals 

A student who wishes to appeal academic suspension 
must appeal in writing to Student Academic Services by the 
appeals deadline in the academic calendar, which is published 
in the Undergraduate Bulletin and semester Registration Guide. 
Academic suspension appeals are considered in cases where 
circumstances beyond the student's control have interfered 
with the student's academic performance. 

Events/Circumstances that Merit an Appeal 

• Personal or family emergency 

• Unanticipated, serious medical difficulty (exclud- 
ing chronic conditions— students are responsible for 
properly balancing academic work with known chronic 
conditions) 

• Serious psychological difficulty 

Information to be Included in the Appeal 

• State the academic term of suspension you are 
appealing 

• Explain the events/circumstances that were detrimental 
to your academic performance 

• Attach any supporting documentation of events/circum- 
stances that merit your appeal 

• Describe how the events/circumstances in your appeal 
have been resolved 

• Describe your plans for ensuring satisfactory academic 
performance in the coming academic term, should your 
appeal be approved. 

Contact Student Academic Services at 336/334-5730 for 
additional information. 

Academic Suspension Appeals will be reviewed by Stu- 
dent Academic Services and/or the Academic Appeals Com- 
mittee. Students will be notified of the results of their appeals 
in writing. 

Formerly suspended students who wish to return must 
agree to participate in a program sponsored by Student 
Academic Services during their first semester upon return. 
Failure to meet the conditions of this program will result in 
immediate dismissal from the term. Formerly suspended stu- 
dents will be notified of the details of this program by Student 
Academic Services. 



Academic Dismissal 

Academic dismissal will occur as a result of either of the 
following: 

1. Freshmen who return on academic probation after 
suspension will be dismissed if they fail to earn 
either a minimum 2.30 GPA each term or raise their 
cumulative GPA to 1.75. 

2. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who return 
on academic probation after suspension will be 
dismissed if they fail to earn either a minimum 2.30 
GPA each term or raise their cumulative GPA to 2.0. 

Students who have been academically dismissed cannot 
enroll at UNCG. One year after an academic dismissal, stu- 
dents may petition Student Academic Services to return to the 
University. Approval to continue after academic dismissal is 
a relatively rare occurrence. If approved, students will return 
carrying academic probation status. Students must also apply 
to Undergraduate Admissions to return. 

Information to be included in the Academic Dismissal 
Appeal 

• Explain the events/circumstances that were detrimental 
to your academic performance during your previous 
enrollment at UNCG 

• Describe how these events/circumstances have been 
resolved 

• Describe your plans for ensuring satisfactory academic 
performance in the coming academic term, should your 
appeal be approved. 

Return to the University After Academic Probation, 
Suspension, or Dismissal 

Students not in good academic standing (academic pro- 
bation, suspension, dismissal) when they leave the University 
must meet readmission requirements. If students not in good 
academic standing attend another post-secondary institution, 
they must have an overall and transferable 2.0 GPA on a 4.0 
scale on all courses taken since leaving the University. 

Dismissed students must petition Student Academic Ser- 
vices to return to the University. Formerly dismissed students 
who successfully petition to return must agree to participate 
in a program sponsored by Student Academic Services dur- 
ing their first semester upon return. Failure to meet the condi- 
tions of this program will result in immediate dismissal from 
the term. Formerly dismissed students will be notified about 
the details of this program when their appeal is approved. 

Academic Appeals 

The Director of Student Academic Services and the 
Academic Appeals Committee, appointed from the faculty, 
consider special and meritorious requests for waivers of aca- 
demic regulations stated in the Undergraduate Bulletin. The 
Committee's decision on an academic suspension and dis- 
missal appeal is final. The student should consult the Office 
of Student Academic Services for information concerning the 
appeal process. 



44 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Regulations 



Credit Regulations 
and Credit Limits 

Summer Session Credit 

Approval to have credit transferred to UNCG for degree 
credits must be obtained from the University Registrar's 
Office. 

Students may enroll for no more than 7 hours during 
each of the two summer sessions, unless permitted to take an 
increased load by the Director of Student Academic Services. 

Transfer Credit 

The sum total of transfer credit from two-year college(s) 
that may be applied toward an undergraduate degree may 
not exceed 64 semester hours. 

In the case of duplicate transfer credit, only the first 
instance in which credit can be awarded is evaluated for the 
UNCG academic transcript. No other attempts are evaluated. 

Current UNCG policy stipulates that courses completed 
in technical, vocational, or professional programs at com- 
munity colleges or courses from technical colleges or propri- 
etary institutions cannot be accepted in transfer, unless they 
are part of a 2Plus articulation agreement. These agreements 
give students with articulated Associate in Applied Science 
degrees access only to complementary degrees at UNCG. 

Transfer Credit Limit 

The sum total of transfer credit from two-year 
college(s) that may be applied toward an under- 
graduate degree may not exceed 64 semester 
hours. 

Transfer Articulation 

Located in the University Registrar's Office, this unit 
enters transfer credit course work into the student's official 
record. Also, in association with University faculty, this unit 
is responsible for determining how other higher education 
institution course work transfers into UNCG. Students with 
questions about transfer credit are encouraged to call the 
University Registrar's Office and ask for the Transfer Articu- 
lation area (336/334-5946). Transfer equivalencies for courses 
taken in the NC Community College system and several area 
universities are available on the Web at www.uncg.edu/reg/ 
transfer/index.html. Students are strongly encouraged to sub- 
mit a transfer credit form, available at www.uncg.edu/reg/ 
Forms/TransferCredit.pdf. 

Extension or Correspondence Credit 
Extension Credit 

UNCG extension credit, earned either on or off campus, 
will be considered transfer credit for admission purposes. 
Up to 64 semester hours in extension and/or correspondence 
credits may be applied to completion of work for an under- 
graduate degree. Academic departments may establish such 
course and credit limitations in acceptance of extension credit 
as may be required by specific degree programs. 



Although UNCG extension credit is treated as transfer 
credit at the time of admission, it will be thereafter considered 
"Residence" credit for degree certification purposes. 

Correspondence Credit 

Up to 64 semester hours in correspondence and exten- 
sion credit may be applied to the completion of work for an 
undergraduate degree with the further stipulation that not 
more than one-fourth of the requirements for the degree may 
be completed in correspondence credit. Academic depart- 
ments may establish such course and credit limitations in 
acceptance of correspondence credit as may be required by 
specific degree programs. 

Although UNCG correspondence credit is treated as 
transfer credit at the time of admission, it will be thereafter 
considered "Residence" credit for degree certification pur- 
poses. 

Correspondence credit earned from institutions other 
than UNCG is always treated as transfer credit. It will have no 
impact on the UNCG grade point average. Only credit hours 
will be applied toward UNCG degree requirements. 

Non-Credit Courses 

No credit toward graduation is given for SAS 100 or SAS 
200. 

Physical Education Credit Limit Policy 

Any University student may take up to eight (8) semester 
hours of elective credit in physical education activity courses 
to apply toward graduation. 

Repeated Courses 

If a course or its equivalent is taken more than once for 
credit and is not repeatable for credit, credit will be applied 
toward degree requirements only once. 

ROTC Credit Limit Policy 

Elective credit shall not exceed 12 semester hours for 
Army ROTC, and 12 hours for Air Force ROTC. 

Placement Examinations 

Placement tests are administered each summer during 
orientation (SOAR) and each semester during the advising 
and registration period by the departments concerned. 

The results of placement tests in French, Latin, and Span- 
ish are binding for student placement in courses. Students 
may enroll in mathematics courses at the level at which they 
place or in lower level courses. Students will neither receive 
credit nor will they be exempt from University distribution 
requirements based on their performance on the tests. 

American Sign Language Placement Examinations 

All students who have had prior experience with 
American Sign Language in high school or elsewhere, or 
who are deaf or hard of hearing and consider themselves 
native signers, or who are transfer students must take the 
placement exam to enroll in SES 102 American Sign Lan- 
guage II through SES 306 American Sign Language VI. The 
American Sign Language placement exam is offered at the 
beginning of each semester. The test takes approximately 
one hour to an hour and a half and is a written and perfor- 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



45 



Academic Regulations 



mance exam. A study guide and additional information is 
provided on the Professions in Deafness Program Web site: 
www.uncg.edu/ses/ses_deaf/ 

French, Latin, and Spanish Placement Tests 

Students who started French, Latin, or Spanish in second- 
ary school and who are beginning their study of that language 
at UNCG must take a placement test. All transfer students 
returning to the study of French, Latin, or Spanish begun in 
high school but not previously pursued at the college level 
must also take the placement test. Students who are transfer- 
ring credits in these languages from another college need not 
take the test in order to continue the same language at UNCG. 
See Romance Languages in chapter 7 for more information 
about the French and Spanish placement tests. 

Mathematics Placement Test 

There is no prerequisite for MAT 112, 115, and 150; hence, 
no student is required to take the Mathematics Placement Test. 
See www.uncg.edu/mat/undergraduate/mathplacetest.html. 

Science or Business majors with very strong backgrounds 
in precalculus or calculus should consult (at least two months 
prior to the beginning of a semester via matplace@uncg.edu) 
with the Department of Mathematical Sciences in order to 
discuss the possibility of taking the Mathematics Placement 
Test. 

Placement Without Credit 

Students with exceptional ability are encouraged to take 
examinations for placement without credit in order to take 
advantage of opportunities for advanced courses and for 
individual research or other creative endeavors. 

Examinations for placement without credit will be 
administered by the departments or schools concerned. It is 
recommended that departments or schools make available 
to interested students reading lists and other source material 
that might assist the students in preparing for the examina- 
tion. 

Passing an examination of this type will not alter the 
number of semester hours required in that area or subject. 
Successful completion of an examination for placement at the 
100 level in the student's major field shall have the effect of 
increasing the number of hours accepted toward graduation 
above the 100 level by the number of hours so waived. 

In all cases in which requirements of prerequisites are 
waived, by placement examination or other means, this fact 
should be reported in writing by the appropriate depart- 
ment head to the University Registrar's Office and should be 
entered on the student's record. 

Special Examination for Credit 

In exceptional circumstances, students may attempt 
to establish academic credit through a Special Examination 
upon the recommendation of the department or school and 
under the supervision of the University Registrar. 

Only those courses that are designated by the department 
or school may be credited by special examination. The depart- 
ment or school shall administer a written examination, except 
in cases where mastery of techniques may be demonstrated in 
other formats. Applications for the exam shall be made to the 
University Registrar with the written permission of the head 



of the department or school, at least 30 days before the exami- 
nation. A nonrefundable fee will be charged, and is payable in 
the Cashiers and Student Accounts Office. 

Examinations must be taken before the last semester or 
12- week summer session preceding the completion of the 
student's degree requirements. Students may not be tested 
in material for which they received high school credit, and 
transfer students may not extend the number of semester 
hours allowed in transfer by this method. Credit will not be 
given for a prerequisite to a course for which the student has 
already received credit. No examination may be given in a 
course for which the student has registered for audit. 

No more than 12 hours may be earned toward gradua- 
tion by this procedure. The School of Nursing has a special 
exemption to present 30 hours by the Special Examination 
Program. Credits earned in this manner may not be used to 
fulfill residency requirements. 

A student must consult in advance with the faculty advi- 
sor and with the head of the department or school concerned 
and file evidence of having prepared for the exam. Assistance 
should be given to the student in developing reading lists and 
other source material. 

Results of all examinations shall be reported to the Regis- 
trar before the first day of the next registration period. Credit, 
but no grade points, will be granted when the level of perfor- 
mance is C or better. 

Average Time to Graduation 

Many factors affect both the length of time and the num- 
ber of credit hours an individual student will require to com- 
plete the baccalaureate degree. Full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents are expected to complete at least 12 hours per semester. 
Failure to complete an average of 15 hours per semester may 
lengthen the student's time to graduation. Some majors do 
require formal admission beyond that required for admission 
to the University in general. 

Students should meet with their academic advisors regu- 
larly to plan their academic schedules. To graduate, students 
must complete specific University requirements as well as 
requirements within the major. Students who change majors 
may find that additional requirements must be fulfilled. 
Changing majors excessively, or after the third or fourth 
semester of study, may also lengthen the time to graduation. 

Criteria for admission to a specific major (outlined in this 
Bulletin) and continuation in that major may include a Univer- 
sity grade point average exceeding that required for continu- 
ation within the University as a whole. Students considering 
such majors should become familiar with the guidelines, and 
work with an academic advisor, as soon as possible to ensure 
that they meet the criteria. 



Steps to Graduation 

By the beginning of the semester or summer session in 
which graduation is expected, undergraduates must officially 
apply for graduation to the University Registrar. Fulfillment 
of all requirements for the degree applied for, as well as offi- 
cial application for the degree, are the student's responsibili- 
ties. 



46 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Regulations 



Academic Requirements 

Candidates for a baccalaureate degree must satisfy all of 
the specific requirements of UNCG and of the School/College 
and department in which they major. They must present for 
graduation the specific number of semester hours required 
for the degree with a minimum cumulative overall grade 
point average of at least 2.0 on all hours undertaken. 

At least 36 of the total hours for the degree must be at the 
300 level or above. 

Graduation Requirements 

Students must complete the specific number of 
semester hours required for the degree with a 
minimum cumulative overall grade point aver- 
age of at least 2.0 on all hours undertaken; at 
least 36 of the total hours for the degree must 
be at the 300 level or above; all students must 
complete at least 31 hours in residence at 
UNCG for the degree. 

Residence Requirements 

All students must complete at least 31 hours in residence 
at UNCG for the degree, 12 of which must be in the major 
field and nine (9) of which must be in the minor if a minor 
is sought. After enrollment, Extension credit and Correspon- 
dence courses offered by UNCG are considered residence 
credit; however, credit earned by special examination is not 
considered residence credit. 

Time Requirements 

General Education Requirements 

The following policies regard time allowed for comple- 
tion of GEC and GEC + CAR requirements. The Office of the 
University Registrar can provide additional details. 

GEC or GEC + CAR Requirements 

Students must meet the General Education or General 
Education and College Additional Requirements for gradu- 
ation as stated in this Undergraduate Bulletin in effect at the 
time of original enrollment at UNCG. If the student fails to 
graduate within seven years, however, the University 1 has the 
option of enforcing 

1. the original requirements, or 

2. the GEC or GEC + CAR requirements in effect at the 
time the seven year period expired, or 

3. the GEC or GEC + CAR requirements in effect at the 
time of re-enrollment if the student withdrew. 

l Typicatty, the UNCG Office of the University Registrar will make 
the choice among these options in consultation with the depart- 
ment in which the student chooses to major. 

Major Requirements 

Students must meet the departmental major require- 
ments in effect when the student declares or, if required by the 
department, is formally admitted to a school/college major. If 
the student fails to graduate within seven years, however, the 
University* has the option of enforcing 



1. the original requirements, 

2. the major requirements in effect at the time the 
seven year period expired, or 

3. the major requirements in effect at the time of re- 
enrollment if the student withdrew. 

*Typically, the department in which the student chooses to major 
will make the choice among these options in consultation with the 
UNCG Office of Student Academic Services. 

Application for Graduation 

All undergraduate students are required to file an appli- 
cation for graduation with the University Registrar's Office at 
the beginning of the semester in which they plan to graduate. 
The online degree application is available via UNCGenie. 

This application is required for processing the final 
degree audit and for printing diplomas. See chapter 3 for 
current graduation application fees. The fee is nonrefundable. 
The deadline dates for filing are also published each year in 
the University Calendar, in each semester's Registration Guide 
booklet, and on the University Registrar's Web site. 

Students who do not graduate in the semester for which 
they file a graduation application must refile for the next term 
in which they expect to complete their degrees. 

The graduation application deadlines for undergradu- 
ates filing for the 2009-10 academic year are: 

For those graduating in December 2009 

early deadline: Wednesday, June 24, 2009 
final deadline: Friday, September 11, 2009 

For those graduating in May 2010 

early deadline: Monday, November 23, 2009 
final deadline: Friday, February 5, 2010 

For those graduating in August 2010 

early deadline: Monday, April 26, 2010 

final deadline: Friday, May 28, 2010 

Early Deadlines 

It is in the student's best interest to apply by the early 
graduation application deadline for the term in which require- 
ments are to be completed. By applying early, the student 
receives graduation status feedback before the end of drop/ 
add for the upcoming term. 

Undergraduates who do not file applications for gradu- 
ation by the published deadlines may petition to the Office 
of the University Registrar for an exemption. Only extremely 
unusual circumstances warrant exceptions to these deadlines, 
however, as notification of the candidates for graduation 
must be submitted to the Board of Trustees for official action 
shortly after the deadline dates for filing each term. 

Graduation with Honors 

The designation of graduation with honors is based on all 
courses (including the last semester's work) for which grades 
and grade points are given. Any senior is eligible for honors 
who, at the end of the senior year, has completed at least 45 
semester hours of work in residence at UNCG. This does not 
include hours for which credit and grade points have been 
received by special examinations. Honors information printed 
in the commencement program is based on course work com- 
pleted through the previous semester. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



47 



Academic Regulations 



Honors are awarded to graduating seniors as follows: 
Summa cum laude (with highest honor) 

achievement of a minimum grade point average of 3.90 
Magna cum laude (with great honor) 

achievement of a minimum grade point average of 3.70 
Cum laude (with honor) 

achievement of a minimum grade point average of 3.50 

Honors for Second Degree Recipients and Transfer 
Students 

To maintain equity with students who have attended 
all four years at UNCG and who may have a semester GPA 
that would qualify them for honors, the following policy is 
in place: Any second degree candidate or degree candidate 
who transferred to UNCG from another institution is eligi- 
ble for graduation with honors who, at the end of the final 
year, has completed toward the degree (in the case of second 
degree students, toward the second degree) at least 45 semes- 
ter hours of work in residence at UNCG and has earned the 
requisite grade point average. 

Commencement Ceremonies 

Commencement ceremonies are held in May and Decem- 
ber of each year; there is no formal ceremony in August. The 
names of August degree recipients are printed in the Decem- 
ber commencement program and on the University Regis- 
trar's Web site at: 

www.uncg.edu/reg/DegreeFiles/index.html 

Commencement Participation Policy 

Approved by the Chancellor, February, 19, 2003 

Students completing all degree requirements by the end 
of the spring semester are encouraged to participate in May 
Commencement. Students completing degree requirements 
by the end of the fall semester are encouraged to participate 
in the December Commencement. 

Students completing degree requirements by the end 
of the Summer Session may participate in either the May or 
December commencement ceremony by applying to gradu- 
ate, paying the graduation fee, and notifying the University 
Registrar's Office. 

Please note: Degree candidates will neither earn 
degrees nor be graduated from the University until they 
have completed all degree requirements. Participation in 
a commencement ceremony does not presume graduation 
from the University. 

Students who do not apply for graduation before the 
published deadline for any semester must apply for gradu- 
ation during the next semester. Students who have applied 
for graduation but fail to meet the requirements must reapply 
for graduation by the published deadline for the semester in 
which they will fulfill the requirements. 

Degrees are conferred only after all requirements are com- 
pleted and the Board of Trustees has taken official action. 



Other Regulations 

Requirements for a Second Baccalaureate Degree 

A student with a bachelor's degree may receive a second 
baccalaureate degree if it is a different degree or a different 
major. In such a case, all the requirements for the second 
degree and major as stated in the catalog which the student is 
entitled to follow must be met. In any case, a minimum of 31 
semester hours in residence beyond requirements for the first 
degree must be completed. 

Meeting requirements for a second major 
does not qualify a student to receive a second 
degree. See chapter 6 for an explanation of 
second majors. 

Simultaneous Degrees 

A student may receive two degrees at the same time if 
the requirements for both degrees are met. A minimum of 
31 hours in residence beyond the requirements for the first 
degree must be completed (e.g., if the first degree requires 122 
hours, a total of 153 hours must be completed). 

Honors for Second Degree Recipients and Transfer 
Students 

To maintain equity with students who have attended 
all four years at UNCG and who may have a semester GPA 
that would qualify them for honors, the following policy is in 
place: Any second degree candidate or degree candidate who 
transferred to UNCG from another institution is eligible for 
graduation with honors who, at the end of the final year, has 
completed toward the degree (in the case of second degree 
students, toward the second degree) at least 45 hours of work 
in residence at UNCG and has earned the requisite grade 
point average. 

Dual Registration as Undergraduate and Graduate 

Undergraduate students at UNCG who plan to under- 
take graduate study at UNCG, and who lack no more than 
12 semester hours of work to fulfill all requirements for the 
bachelor's degree, may enroll in The Graduate School. Total 
graduate credit obtained in this dual status may not exceed 12 
hours. Students must apply for admission to a graduate pro- 
gram before requests for dual registration can be approved, 
but do not have to be formally admitted until the end of the 
semester in which credit is earned. For dual registration sta- 
tus, the approval of the Dean of The Graduate School and the 
student's major advisor are required. 

Students should be advised that approval for dual regis- 
tration neither guarantees nor constitutes acceptance into any 
graduate program. 



48 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



5. University Requirements 



Undergraduate Degrees 
& Degree Requirements 

Undergraduate Degrees 

UNCG offers seven baccalaureate degrees: 

B.A. Bachelor of Arts 

B.RA. Bachelor of Fine Arts 

B.M. Bachelor of Music 

B.S. Bachelor of Science 

B.S.M.T. Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

B.S.N. Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

B.S.W. Bachelor of Social Work 

Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree 

A bachelor's degree from UNCG is awarded to a student 
who has met the following requirements: 

1. Successful completion of a minimum of 122 semester 
hours, distributed as follows: 

a. General education core (GEC): 
36-37 s.h. (minimum) 

b. General education marker courses (may also satisfy 
General Education core and/or major requirements) 

c. Additional College/School requirements 

d. Major subject and related areas: 
as required by program 

e. Electives: as required by program 
Total minimum s.h.: 122 

2. A grade point average on the semester hours attempted 
of not less than 2.0 

3. At least 36 s.h. of courses at the 300 course level or 
above 

4. At least 31 s.h. in residence at UNCG, 12 of which must 
be in the major field and nine (9) of which must be in 
the minor if a minor is sought 

The College of Arts and Sciences and each of the six (6) 
professional schools— Joseph M. Bryan School of Business 
and Economics; Education; Health and Human Performance; 
Human Environmental Sciences; Music; Nursing— have 
structured their individual degree programs to comply with 
this all-University degree framework. 

Students who are undecided about their major are 
advised through the College of Arts and Sciences Advising 
Center (CAS A). CAS A advisors help these students deter- 
mine the major program (in the College or one of the profes- 
sional schools) that is best suited for them while they com- 
plete courses in the General Education Core. 

Programs of study leading to the baccalaureate degree 
are listed in chapter 6. 



Average Time to Graduation 

Many factors affect both the length of time and the num- 
ber of semester hours an individual student will require to 
complete the baccalaureate degree. At UNCG the median 
number of months to graduation for full time students is 46. 
The median number of hours completed is 125. 

Full time undergraduate students are expected to com- 
plete at least 12 hours per semester. Failure to complete an 
average of 15 hours per semester may lengthen the student's 
time to graduation. Some majors do require formal admission 
beyond that required for admission to the University in gen- 
eral. 

Students should meet with their academic advisors regu- 
larly to plan their academic schedules. To graduate, students 
must complete specific University requirements as well as 
requirements within the major. Students who change majors 
may find that additional requirements must be fulfilled. 
Changing majors excessively, or after the third or fourth 
semester of study, may also lengthen the time to graduation. 
Also see Tuition Surcharge in chapter 3. 

Criteria for admission to a specific major (outlined in this 
Bulletin) and continuation in that major may include a Uni- 
versity grade point average exceeding that required for con- 
tinuation within the University as a whole. Students consider- 
ing such majors should become familiar with the guidelines, 
and work with an academic advisor as soon as possible to 
ensure that they meet the criteria. 

Changes in Degree Requirements and Other 
Regulations 

The University reserves the right to make changes as 
required in course offerings, curricula, academic policies, and 
other rules and regulations affecting students, to be effective 
whenever determined by the University. These changes will 
govern current and formerly enrolled students. Enrollment of 
all students is subject to these conditions. 

General Education Program 

The UNCG General Education Program, approved 
by the UNCG Faculty Senate in March 2000, is effective for 
new undergraduates entering UNCG in fall 2001 and there- 
after. The Speaking Intensive (SI) General Education Marker 
requirement became effective fall 2002. 

Philosophy of UNCG's General Education Program 

The faculty and staff of The University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro are dedicated to student learning and 
believe that the best evidence of this commitment is the cali- 
ber of UNCG graduates. A UNCG graduate should combine 
specialized education in a major with the skills, knowledge, 
and understanding necessary to be a lifelong learner, an ethi- 
cal and independent decision maker, a critical and creative 
thinker, a clear and effective communicator, and a responsible 
citizen. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



44 



University Requirements 



The character and abilities of an educated person are the 
product not solely of a specific battery of courses but of an 
entire process of education. The mandate to foster the knowl- 
edge, character, and sensibility of a university-educated per- 
son belongs to the entire university, not to a single depart- 
ment or unit. To the extent possible, learning in the General 
Education Core should provide foundations and alternative 
perspectives for the more specialized knowledge gained in 
the major, while learning in the major should build upon and 
extend the work that is done in general education courses. 

Student Learning Goals 

The General Education Program Goals are under revi- 
sion at the time of printing. The new goals will be posted to 
www.uncg.edu/reg/Catalog/current/UnivReq/GECProgram. 
html and http://provost.uncg.edu/Underedu/General_Ecluca- 
tion after approval in the summer of 2009. 
Proficiencies 

A university education should result in the student's abil- 
ity to gather, comprehend, and evaluate information and to 
communicate this knowledge. Because such skills are impor- 
tant to lifelong learning and participation in a modern society, 
graduates should demonstrate the following proficiencies: 

• ability to write and speak clearly, coherently and 
effectively as well as to adapt modes of communica- 
tion to one's audience 

• ability to interpret academic writing and discourse 
in a variety of disciplines 

• ability to interpret numerical data and perform 
basic computation 

• ability to locate, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate 
information 

• ability to utilize appropriate technologies 

Knowledge and Understanding 

A university education should also result in knowledge 
and understanding of a wide range of important subject mat- 
ter and ways of thinking and knowing. Such knowledge and 
understanding are necessary for a person to be a lifelong 
learner, an independent decision-maker, a critical and cre- 
ative thinker, and a responsible and participating citizen. Stu- 
dents should acquire broad knowledge and understanding of 
the following: 

• Scientific principles and their use in scientific 
inquiry 

• Mathematical principles and their use in solving 
problems 

• Historical, cultural, and philosophical traditions 
that have shaped our diverse society 

• Significant elements of the world's diversity of 
cultural and national experiences, and interconnec- 
tions among them 

• The aims and methods of intellectual, spiritual, 
literary, and artistic expression 

• The importance that abstract ideas and artistic 
expression have in the process of self-understand- 
ing and in the shaping of society 

• The individual, society, and interactions between 
them 



Habits of Mind and Attributes of Character 

In addition to specified proficiencies and areas of knowl- 
edge and understanding, the university-educated person 
should possess certain habits of mind and attributes of char- 
acter. These qualities are the consequence of a total educa- 
tional experience rather than any segment of it. 

• Sensitivity to social and cultural differences 

• Sensitivity and attentiveness to the ethical dimen- 
sions of any problem or experience 

• A disposition to weigh opposing viewpoints in 
the balance of reason and to develop an informed 
perspective 

• A disposition to continue learning and to welcome 
new knowledge and insight (intellectual curiosity) 

• Openness to the value of new social, cultural, or 
aesthetic forms (flexibility of mind and sensibility) 

• An appreciation for the broader social, intellectual, 
and historical contexts of individual events and 
situations 

• Recognition of social and intellectual responsibility 
To ensure that students attain these Student Learning 

Goals by graduation, UNCG requires that they complete the 
General Education Core (GEC) requirements listed below. 
Other requirements and opportunities in the major program, 
the minor program (if any), and the total undergraduate 
experience build on the foundation of the GEC and contribute 
to the attainment of these goals. Students are thus given the 
opportunity to work toward each goal not just in one course, 
but in a series of courses and learning experiences encoun- 
tered from the freshman through the senior year. Alternative 
ways to demonstrate competencies will be available to stu- 
dents with documented disabilities. 

General Education Core Category/Marker 
Descriptions 

The following are brief descriptions of the General Edu- 
cation Core categories and markers, their methods, and learn- 
ing goals. 

Humanities and Fine Arts (GLT, GFA, GPR) 
Literature (GLT) 

Students read and write about selected works of 
prose and/or poetry from diverse cultural tradi- 
tions, analyzing the context, aims, and methods of 
literary expression. 

Fine Arts (GFA) 

By focusing on painting, sculpture, architecture, 
drama, dance, cinema, or music, students gain 
understanding of the aims and methods of artistic 
expression and the role of cultural traditions and 
artistic value in human society. 

Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives (GPR) 
For two or more significant philosophical, ethi- 
cal, and/or religious traditions, students examine 
and compare assumptions, modes of thought, and 
attendant practices, and analyze their effects on 
behavior. 



50 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



Historical Perspectives (GHP) 

Students use an historical approach to a specific region 
and period to explore the context of events (social struc- 
ture, economics, political systems, culture, or beliefs), 
evaluate evidence and divergent interpretations, and 
communicate historical ideas in writing. 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 

By focusing on the concepts of one physical or biologi- 
cal science, students gain understanding of scientific 
inquiry as they analyze empirical information, distin- 
guish between primary research and secondary reports, 
and communicate effectively about scientific issues. 

Mathematics (GMT) 

Students gain the skills to perform computations on 
data, to use mathematical principles to solve problems, 
and to reason with and manipulate concepts within a 
mathematical system. 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 

Students gain skills in intellectual discourse, including 
constructing cogent arguments, locating, synthesizing 
and analyzing documents, and writing and speaking 
clearly, coherently, and effectively. 

Social and Behavioral Science (GSB) 

By focusing on a particular discipline which studies 
the behavior of individuals, groups, or organizations, 
students learn to use its methodology and theoreti- 
cal framework to interpret, analyze, and evaluate the 
broader social contexts of individual events or situa- 
tions. 

Markers (GL, GN, SI, WI) 
Global (GL) 

In a course in any subject, students focus on the 
interconnections among regions of the world, inter- 
pret and evaluate information on diverse ecologies, 
human societies, artistic achievements, or political 
systems, and gain sensitivity to cultural differences 
on a global scale. 

Global Non-Western (GN) 

In a course in any subject, students focus on the 
interconnections among regions of the world other 
than North America, Great Britain, and continen- 
tal Europe, interpret and evaluate information on 
diverse ecologies, human societies, artiste achieve- 
ments, or political systems, and gain sensitivity to 
cultural differences on a global scale. 

Speaking Intensive (SI) 

In a course in any subject, students receive instruc- 
tion in an appropriate mode of oral communication 
(interpersonal or small group communication, or 
presentational speaking), and enhanced opportuni- 
ties to practice improvement of oral communication 
skills. 

Writing Intensive (WI) 

In a course in any subject, students demonstrate 
their understanding of its concepts and materials 
through writing, using constructive criticism from 



readers to revise drafts and produce one or more 
clear, coherent, and effective written assignments 
appropriate to the field. 

General Education Core (GEC) Requirements 

I. GEC Category Requirements 
(36-37 total semester hours required) 

Select courses as indicated from the following categories: 

Category S.H. 

Humanities and Fine Arts 12 

One course from Literature list (GLT) 3 

One course from Fine Arts list (GFA) 3 

One course from Philosophical/Religious/ 

Ethical Perspectives list (GPR) 3 

One additional course from any of the above 3 

Historical Perspectives (GHP) 3 

One course from Historical Perspectives list 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

Two courses from Natural Science list as follows: 

• One must be a laboratory course. 

• Each must have a different departmental prefix. 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

One course from Mathematics list 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

• ENG 101 or FMS 1 15 or RCO 101 3 

• One additional course from Reasoning and 
Discourse list 3 

Social and Behavioral Science (GSB) 6 

Two courses from Social and Behavioral Science list 

II. GE Marker Requirements 

Fulfill the following requirements: 

One writing intensive course (indicated in the online 
Schedule of Courses by marker WI) in any discipline 
[In addition to this GE Writing Intensive requirement, stu- 
dents must also complete a second Writing Intensive course 
within the major. The College of Arts and Sciences requires 
additional Writing Intensive courses; see chapter 6.] 

One speaking intensive course (indicated in the online 
Schedule of Courses by marker SI) in any discipline 
[In addition to this GE Speaking Intensive requirement, stu- 
dents must also complete a second Speaking Intensive course 
within the major.] 

Four Global Perspectives courses (indicated in semester 
Schedule of Courses by markers GL or GN) 

• At least one of the Global Perspectives courses must 
carry the GN (non-Western course) marker 

• GL/GN courses may include a maximum of two (2) 
courses in a foreign language (6 s.h.) 

• One GL/GN course requirement is waived for 
each semester completed in a credit-bearing Study 
Abroad experience, up to a maximum of two course 
waivers. A summer program abroad counts as a 
semester. 



< 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



51 



University Requirements 



► 



• A foreign language course completed to meet an 
admission deficiency does not meet a GL or GN 
requirement. 

Courses used to meet the Core Category Requirements 
(#1 above) also fulfill the Marker Requirements if the course 
carries the indicated marker in the online Schedule of Courses. 
Other marker courses are also available, including courses 
in the major. It is therefore possible to meet all GE Marker 
requirements while completing the courses under #1 above 
and/or courses required for the major. 

Waivers of Marker Courses for Transfer Students 

For students who initially transfer to UNCG as juniors 
or seniors, SI and WI courses outside the major requirements 
and two GL/GN courses are waived. WI course requirements 
for students transferring to the College of Arts and Sciences 
are governed by policies stated in chapter 6. 

III. Work toward Student Learning Goals outside 
the GEC 

The General Education Core provides a foundation for 
progress toward the UNCG Student Learning Goals. These 
goals are then reinforced in the major and minor programs 
that students complete before graduation. In addition to the 
GEC and marker requirements described above, all bachelor's 
degree programs require: 

• At least one additional writing intensive course 
(WI) in the major 

• At least one additional speaking intensive course 
(SI) in the major 

• Proficiency level in technology as required for the 
major 

• Proficiency level in information skills/research as 
required for the major 

General Education Core Approved Courses 

The courses listed at the end of this chapter have been 
approved by the General Education Committee responsible 
for their oversight, and by the Undergraduate Curriculum 
Committee. See the Class Schedule in UNCGenie for com- 
plete General Education core and marker listings. 

Writing Intensive (WI) Courses and Speaking 
Intensive (SI) Courses 

GEC requires one WI and one SI marker course from any 
discipline; a second WI course and a second SI course are to 
be taken in the major. Please note that the College of Arts and 
Sciences requires additional WI courses. 

Throughout the year, Writing Intensive (WI) and Speak- 
ing Intensive (SI) courses are approved for offering by the 
Writing Intensive and Speaking Intensive Committees. Since 
most WI and SI courses are approved to carry the WI or SI 
marker only for specific instructors or only for a given term, 
lists of WI and SI courses are not published in the Undergradu- 
ate Bulletin. 

Enrollment in certain Writing Intensive and Speaking 
Intensive courses is restricted to majors in that program. 
Students should always be aware of course prerequisites 
and other course restrictions as stated in this Bulletin before 
attempting to register for a course. 



General Education Credit through Study Abroad 

In addition to the above listed courses, students may 
receive General Education Core category and marker credit 
for courses taken in three overseas programs offered by the 
University's International Programs Center. For information 
about these courses, contact the International Programs Cen- 
ter, 127 Mclver Street, UNCG, 336/334-5404. 
Fall Semester in Estonia 

Political System and Administration (GSB) 

Estonian History (GHP) 

Estonian Literature in Translation (GLT-GN) 

Estonian Culture (GFA) 

Ecology and Nature in Estonia (GNS) 

Economy (GSB) 
Fall Semester in Finland 

Cultures and Societies of Scandinavia (GSB) 

Indigenous Cultures of the Polar Region (GN) 

Arts of Scandinavia (GFA) 

Finnish and Scandinavian Literature in Translation (GLT-GN) 

Nordic Nature and Environment (GNS) 
Spring Semester in Poland 

Arts in Contemporary Poland (GFA) 

Culture and Society in Contemporary Poland (GSB) 

Evolution of Political Systems in Eastern Europe (GSB) 

History of Poland (GHP) 

Transition of Central European Countries to Market Economies (GSB) 

Polish Literature in Translation (GLT-GN) 

Additional College of Arts and Sciences 
Requirements (CAR) 

Additional General Education requirements have been 
established by the College of Arts and Sciences, including 
requirements for foreign language study and writing inten- 
sive courses. These requirements are listed in detail below. 

Basic Technology Competencies 

UNCG recognizes that the ability to utilize appropriate 
technologies is an essential proficiency for a university gradu- 
ate in the twenty-first century. The University has established 
a list of Basic Technology Competencies in the categories of 
computer operation; setup; maintenance and troubleshoot- 
ing; word processing; spreadsheet/graphing; library research; 
networking; telecommunication; use of Internet/Web; media 
communications; and multimedia integration. The list of 
these competencies is available as an online resource, and 
provides several means available to UNCG students for 
acquiring each competency, with options that include campus 
workshops, computer lab staff support, and Web sites. Go to 
www.uncg.edu/tlc/student_competencies.html to view and 
access these resources. 

UNCG students are expected to use a variety of these 
basic technology competencies and additional competencies 
relevant to their fields of study. Incoming students should 
review the basic competencies and work to correct any defi- 
ciencies. 



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2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



Information & Research Skills 
Competencies 

In addition to basic technology skills, information liter- 
acy, which is the acquisition of information skills and research 
competencies, is an important Learning Goal of the General 
Education Program. Familiarity with information resources 
is essential in acquiring such skills, and these skills should be 
integrated into the academic curriculum. To assist students in 
gaining these skills, UNCG's University Libraries offers two 
levels of information literacy instruction to undergraduates: 

1. First-Year Undergraduates — students achieve 
orientation to research skills by completing the 
Library's Web tutorial and/or attending an instruc- 
tional session, led by a librarian, that is integrated 
into one of their courses. 

2. Upper Division Undergraduates — students who 
have not achieved the objectives of library instruc- 
tion for first-year students may use the Library's 
Web tutorials designed for this purpose. In addi- 
tion, more advanced skills may be gained through 
sessions that relate directly to course assignments 
and are arranged by teaching faculty for specific 
classes. Librarians tailor instruction to specific disci- 
plines and assignments and also meet with students 
to offer individual assistance. 

See http://library.uncg.edu/depts/ref/libinstruction 
and http://library.uncg.edu/depts/ref/tutorial for additional 
information. 

Definitions of Academic Program 
Terminology 

Undergraduate Areas of Study 

Undergraduate areas of study include all majors, con- 
centrations, teacher licensure programs, minors, and second 
majors that are available to UNCG students. Each area of 
study carries a unique code, which is used to identify the pro- 
gram. Students seeking a baccalaureate degree must select a 
primary major, and may, after consultation with an advisor, 
also select a minor or a second major. See chapter 10 for a list- 
ing of current Areas of Study codes. 

Also refer to chapter 6, Academic Units, for a complete 
list of available areas of study and the departmental listings 
for specific program and degree requirements. 

Major 

A major is a formalized curricular program leading to 
a degree. Each academic unit or department establishes the 
course requirements for each major program, concentrations 
within a major, and related area requirements. All program 
requirements follow the general structure described below. 

Concentration 

A concentration is a formalized curricular sequence 
established to achieve a specific goal within a major. 



Major Description 

The following information is always included at the 
beginning of any program description: 

1. Name of Major 

2. Degree Awarded 

3. Total Semester Hours Required for the Degree 

4. Area of Study Codes (AOS) 

5. Concentrations Available (if more than one area of 
study is available) 

Program Admission Requirements 

Special program admission and/or continuation require- 
ments, if any, are listed immediately following the descrip- 
tion of the major and degree. A number of programs have 
requirements that must be met before the student can be 
formally admitted to the major and permitted to take upper 
level courses. Such requirements usually involve completion 
of foundation courses, achievement of a certain GPA, and 
completion of a specified number of semester hours. Certain 
programs require portfolio review or audition for admission. 

Program Course Requirements 
General Education Requirements 

All students completing undergraduate degrees at 
UNCG are required to complete General Education Core and 
Marker Requirements as described above. 

All undergraduate programs follow General Education 
requirements. Most programs in the College of Arts & Sci- 
ences have requirements (CAR) in addition to the General 
Education requirements as described below. General Edu- 
cation Core and Marker requirements, including specific 
courses specified by the program, are listed prior to the major 
requirements. 

Major Requirements 

Major requirements include all courses that must be 
taken within the major department for completion of the 
degree. All undergraduate majors require a minimum of 27 
semester hours in the major program of study 

Majors that provide students with more than one concen- 
tration or area of study within the major will usually separate 
the Major Requirements into Core Requirements and Addi- 
tional Concentration Requirements. 

A program of study taken by a student as a second major, 
in addition to the student's primary major, must meet all 
requirements as stated for that major. For example, a student 
pursuing English as his or her primary major who wishes to 
obtain a second major in French, must meet all the require- 
ments for the English major as well as those for the French 
major. 

Core Requirements 

Core courses are those courses required of all students in 
the major, regardless of concentration. 

Additional Concentration Requirements 

Concentration requirements are additional courses 
required only for a specific concentration. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



53 



University Requirements 



Related Area Requirements 

A number of majors require courses from other depart- 
ments or programs for completion of the degree. Such courses 
are listed as "Related Area" requirements following the major 
requirements. 

Teacher Licensure Requirements 

Programs that lead to teacher licensure also list teacher 
licensure requirements. 

Second Academic Concentration Requirements for 
Teacher Licensure Programs 

Several teacher licensure programs require students to 
complete a second academic concentration in addition to the 
primary major program. Students in teacher education pro- 
grams should check with their advisors or with the Teachers 
Academy for available second academic concentrations. Also 
see Teacher Education Programs in this Bulletin. 

Electives 

Most programs do not specify which electives a student 
must take although some may make suggestions. Electives are 
those courses taken to complete the semester hours required 
for the degree after fulfilling General Education requirements 
and major, related and/or other program requirements. 

Minors 

A minor is a formalized curricular sequence taken by a 
student outside his or her major area of study. Programs that 
can be taken as minors are described following descriptions of 
the major and second major. A minimum of 15 semester hours 
in a department is required to complete an area of study as a 
minor. Several areas of study can be taken only as minors. See 
individual programs for details. 

Special Curriculum Option (Plan II) 

For students whose needs are not met by the formal 
majors and degrees offered at UNCG, a special curriculum 
option— called Plan II— allows students to design their own 
course of study in consultation with appropriate faculty. 

Students desiring to pursue Plan II should be advised 
that there is no guarantee that their proposed program will 
lead to graduation until it has been fully approved. Develop- 
ing a program is a time consuming process, often taking one 
year from initial intent to final approval. Students must file 
a statement of intent to pursue Plan II in the Office of Stu- 
dent Academic Services prior to registering for their last 45 
semester hours. Required steps have been adopted by the 
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee for approving Plan II 
programs. The following is an abbreviated description of the 
procedures that must be followed: 

1. Consult with the Director of Student Academic 
Services regarding general requirements and pro- 
cedures. All general University requirements and 
minimum admission requirements for the desired 
departmental programs must be met by any Plan II 
program. 

2. Select a faculty advisor with expertise in the inter- 
disciplinary major. 

3. Select another member of the faculty to serve on an 
advisory committee. 

4. Develop a formal proposal with the committee. 



5. Send proposal to Undergraduate Curriculum Com- 
mittee. 

Minor modifications to an approved Plan II program 
may be made if approved by both the faculty advisor and the 
Director of Student Academic Services. Other modifications 
require the full process outlined. 

Guide to Course Descriptions 

Course descriptions are comprised of the following infor- 
mation: 

1 . Course Number 

2. Course Title 

3. Course Credit (in parentheses) 

4. Special Information, which may include: 
General Education credit 
Prerequisites and/or corequisites 
Special restrictions or other requirements 
Repeat-for-Credit notation (if course can be 

repeated) 
Grading Mode (if other than letter grade) 

5. Description of course content 

6. Frequency of offering (in parentheses); optional 

7. Equivalent courses (in parentheses) 

Each course description is represented by a three-letter 
prefix (indicating the department or program within which 
the course is taken) and a three-digit course number. After 
each course title are two (or three) numbers separated by 
colons which indicate semester hours credit, lecture, and 
laboratory hours. Following the credit indicator the following 
items may be listed: General Education credit; course pre- 
requisites or corequisites; special restrictions or requirements; 
repeat-for-credit information if the course can be repeated for 
credit; and grading mode if the course is graded other than 
by letter grade. The course description itself may be followed 
by frequency of offering information. Explanations of each of 
these topics follows. 

Course Prefixes 

The following is a listing of current graduate and under- 
graduate course prefixes. 

ACC Accounting 

AFS African American Studies 

APD Apparel Product Design 

ART Art 

AST Astronomy 

ATY Anthropology 

BIO Biology 

BLS Humanities— Liberal Studies 

BUS Business Administration 

CCI Classical Civilization 

CED Counseling & Educational Development 

CHE Chemistry & Biochemistry 

CHI Chinese 

CNR Conflict Resolution 

CRS Consumer, Apparel, & Retail Studies 

CSC Computer Science 

CSD Communication Sciences & Disorders 



54 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



CST Communication Studies 

DCE Dance 

ECO Economics 

EDU Education/Teachers Academy 

ELC Educational Leadership & Cultural Foundations 

ENG English 

ENT Entrepreneurship 

ENV Environmental Studies 

ERM Educational Research Methodology 

ESS Exercise & Sport Science 

FIN Finance 

FMS Freshman Seminars Program 

FRE French 

GEN Genetic Counseling 

GEO Geography 

GER German 

GRK Greek 

GRO Gerontology 

HDF Human Development & Family Studies 

HEA Public Health 

HED Higher Education 

HHP Health & Human Performance 

HIS History 

HSS Honors Programs 

HTM Hospitality & Tourism Management 

IAR Interior Architecture 

IGS International & Global Studies 

ISM Information Systems & Operations 

Management 

ITA Italian 

JNS Japanese Studies 

LAT Latin 

LIN Linguistics 

LIS Library & Information Studies 

MAT Mathematics 

MBA Master of Business Administration 

MGT Management 

MKT Marketing 

MLS Master of Arts in Liberal Studies 

MST Media Studies 

MUS Music 

NTR Nutrition 

NUR Nursing 

PHI Philosophy 

PHY Physics 

POR Portuguese 

PSC Political Science 

PSY Psychology 

RCO Residential College 

RCS Retailing & Consumer Studies 

REL Religious Studies 

RPM Recreation & Parks Management 

RUS Russian 

SAS Student Academic Services 



SCM Supply Chain Management 

SEP Spartan Experience Program 

SES Specialized Education Services 

SOC Sociology 

SPA Spanish 

STA Statistics 

STR Strong College 

SWK Social Work 

TED Teacher Education 

THR Theatre 

UNS University Studies 

WCV Western Civilization 

WGS Women's & Gender Studies 

Course Type/Instructional Delivery Mode 

Courses at UNCG may be offered in several formats, 
based on the mode in which the course is taught or instruc- 
tion delivered. The type of course is reflected in the credit 
structure as well as being detailed in the course description. 
The semester Schedule of Courses also indicates a course's type 
or delivery mode. 

Lecture/Seminar Courses 

A lecture course consists of classes that meet weekly 
for a specified number of hours; instruction is delivered in 
a lecture or seminar setting. The semester hour structure of 
the course is expressed by two numbers, such as (3:3), where 
the first number indicates that the course carries three semes- 
ter hours of credit and the second number indicates that the 
course meets for three lecture/seminar hours per week. 

Laboratory/Studio/Practice Courses 

Such courses, which meet weekly, may combine a lecture 
component with a laboratory/studio/practice component, or 
may consist of a lab/studio/practice session only. 

In a combined lecture and lab/studio course, class sessions 
usually meet at different times and are detailed in the online 
Schedule of Courses for each semester. The credit structure for 
such courses is always expressed by three numbers, such as 
(3:2:3), where the first number represents the semester hours 
credit, the second number represents the number of lecture/ 
seminar hours the course meets per week, and the final num- 
ber, the lab/studio hours required by the course each week. 

A course that is comprised of a lab/studio/practice com- 
ponent only will be expressed by the following credit struc- 
ture: (1:0:3), where the course receives 1 semester hour of 
credit, has no lecture component, and meets for three hours a 
week in a lab/studio/practice environment. 

Web-Based Courses 

Web-based courses are delivered via the Internet, totally 
or in combination with more conventional formats such as in- 
person lectures and/or labs. Web-based courses are denoted 
as such in the online Schedule of Courses. 

Service-Learning Courses 

The University defines Academic Service-Learning as a 
teaching method that links community action and academic 
study so that each strengthens the other. Students, faculty 
and community partners collaborate to enable students to 
address community needs, initiate social change, build effec- 
tive relationships, enhance academic skills, and develop civic 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



55 



University Requirements 



literacy. Service-Learning encourages critical consideration of 
the ethical dimensions of community engagement. Service- 
Learning courses are identified by the course category in the 
online Class Schedule. 

Experimental Courses 

An experimental course is a regular academic credit 
course offered once or twice on an experimental basis through 
an established academic program. Such a course is intended 
to accommodate the expertise of a visiting faculty member or 
to allow faculty to test a course within the UNCG academic 
community. An experimental course is always denoted as 
such by including "Experimental Course" in the title, abbre- 
viated to "Exp Crs" in the course schedule and on the aca- 
demic transcript. 

Practicum/Internship Courses 

A practicum/internship course is usually an upper level 
course, involving a career-related learning experience of lim- 
ited duration in which an individual takes on responsible 
roles outside of the traditional university environment where 
training and supervision are included: in a nonprofit organi- 
zation, a government office, or a private, for-profit business. 
An internship may last for a month, several months, or a year; 
be paid or voluntary; be taken for academic credit or not; be 
full-time or part-time. 

An example of a practicum/internship credit structure is 
(6:1:20), which indicates the course is taken for six (6) semes- 
ter hours credit, has an on-campus seminar or lecture compo- 
nent that meets for 1 hour a week, and requires the student 
to spend approximately 20 hours weekly in the field at the 
off-campus site. 

Course Type Abbreviations 

ACT Activity 

CLN Clinical 

COL Colloquium 

CON Conversational Language Course 

DIS Dissertation 

DSC Discussion 

ENS Ensemble 

IND Independent Study 

INT Internship 

LAB Laboratory 

LEC Lecture 

LEL Lecture & Lab 

PRC Practicum 

PRF Performance 

RES Research 

SAB Study Abroad Course 

SEM Seminar 

STL Studio and Lecture 

STO Studio/Other 

STT Student Teaching 

STU Studio 

THS Thesis 

TUT Tutorial 

VCF Video Conference 

WEB 'Web-based (100% of course instruction is taught 
online.) 



WLB 



WLC 



WLL 



WLS 



WTX 



'Web and lab (-50% of course instruction is 

taught online and -50% is a lab component.) 

'Web and lecture (Course is taught via face-to-face 

lecture and online.) 

'Web, lecture, and lab (Course requirements 

include face-to-face lectures, lab sessions, and an 

Internet component.) 

'Web, lecture, and studio (Used primarily for 

Dance courses) 

'Web with on-campus tests and examinations 

C Used primarily for Math courses) 
l Web interaction involves more than the placement of the course 
syllabus on the instructor's Web site. The course is defined as 
asynchronous instruction where the instructor and student are 
separated by time and space. Interaction in these courses is primar- 
ily through discussion forums, e-mail, and blogs. 

Course Numbers and Levels 

Course level numbers are structured as follows: 
100-199 intended primarily for freshmen 

intended primarily for sophomores 
intended primarily for juniors 
intended primarily for seniors 
intended for advanced undergraduates and 
graduate students; these courses are not open 
to freshmen and sophomores 
registration restricted to students who are clas- 
sified as graduate students 
registration restricted to students admitted to 
doctoral programs 
Undergraduates are reminded that a minimum of 36 
semester hours must be completed at the 300 level or above to 
meet graduation requirements. 

Course descriptions for graduate-level courses (600 and 
700 level) are printed in The Graduate School Bulletin. 

Course Credit Hours 

Course credit, or semester, hours are indicated in paren- 
theses immediately following the course title. The first figure 
indicates the number of semester hour credits awarded for 
the course. The second and third figures indicate the num- 
ber of lecture/seminar and laboratory/studio/practice hours 
normally scheduled each week during the semester in the 
course. 

For example, (3:2:3) indicates the course carries three 
semester hour credits, meets for two lecture/seminar hours 
and three laboratory /studio hours each week. 

When only two figures appear in the parentheses, there 
are no laboratory or studio hour requirements. For example, 
(3:3) indicates that the course carries three semester hour 
credits and meets for three lecture/seminar hours per week. 

Graduate courses and certain other courses may have 
only one figure enclosed in parentheses, which indicates only 
the number of semester hours credit given. 

Normally, a class period is 50 minutes in length for each 
semester hour given. 

Two course numbers separated by a comma indicate a 
sequence of two courses with closely related content. 



200-299 
300-399 
400^99 
500-599 



600-749 



750-799 



% 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Requirement Abbreviations 

Courses approved as meeting requirements in the gen- 
eral education core or marker areas are indicated by one of 
the following abbreviations following the course title and 
credit: 

GEC Category Abbreviations 

GLT Literature 

GFA Fine Arts 

GPR Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives 

GHP Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 

GMT Mathematics 

GNS Natural Sciences 

GRD Reasoning and Discourse 

GSB Social and Behavioral Sciences 

GE Marker Abbreviations 

GL Global Perspectives 

GN Global Non-Western Perspectives 

SI Speaking Intensive 

WI Writing Intensive 

College's Additional Requirements (CAR) Abbreviations 

GPM Historical Perspectives— Premodern 

GMO Historical Perspectives— Modern 

GLS Natural Sciences— Life Science 

GPS Natural Sciences— Physical Science 

GFL Foreign Language 

Course Prerequisites/Corequisites 

A prerequisite is a course that must be completed before 
another course may be taken. A corequisite is a course that 
must be taken concurrently with another course. Prerequi- 
sites and corequisites are indicated after the course title and 
credit by Pr. or Coreq. followed by the requirements that must 
be met before that course may be taken. 

A student may not enroll in a course without having 
completed the proper prerequisites unless these prerequisites 
have been waived by the head of the department in which the 
course is offered. 

Other Course Restrictions 

Some courses carry additional restrictions (Freshmen 
only; Majors only; etc.). Such restrictions are highlighted fol- 
lowing the listing of any course prerequisites. 

Grading Method 

Courses are graded by letter grade (A-F) unless other- 
wise noted in the course description. If a course is graded 
other than by letter grade, this information is stated after the 
prerequisite listing. Also see section on Grading in chapter 4. 

Pass/Not Pass Courses 

The following undergraduate/advanced undergraduate 
courses are graded P/NP (Pass/Not Pass) or S/U (Satisfactory/ 
Unsatisfactory) and are so noted in their descriptions: 

BUS 105B; CED 506; CSD 219, 476, 490, 493, 571; DCE 250, 
365, 461; ELC 506; ENT 196, 496; ESS 461, 462, 471, 522; 
FRE 210; GER 291; GRK 150; HEA 426, 428; HSS 299; IAR 
452; ISM 411; ITA 210; LAT 198, 199; MST 196, 496; MUS 
090, 091, 479; NUR 425, 435, 440, 460; PHY 401; RUS 101L, 
102L; SAS 100, 200; SPA 100; TED 461, 462, 506 



Repeat-for-Credit Notation 

Some courses may be repeated for credit under special 
circumstances. Such information is highlighted following the 
listing of any prerequisites. 

Course Description 

The description of a course is necessarily brief and is 
intended to give students a concise overview of course con- 
tent. A course syllabus, which contains complete details about 
a course's content and requirements, may be obtained from 
the department or instructor. 

Frequency of Course Offering 

Many courses indicate the semester(s) in which they are 
usually offered. This information is indicated in parentheses 
at the end of the course description as follows: 

(Fall & Spring) — course usually offered both fall and 

spring semesters. 
(Fall & Spring & Summer)— course usually offered fall 

and spring semesters and summer session. 
(Fall or Spring) — course usually offered either fall or 

spring semesters. 
(Fall or Spring or Summer)— course may be offered fall 

semester, or spring semester, or summer session. 
(Fall or Spring or Winter)— course may be offered fall 

semester, or spring semester, or winter session. 
(Fall)— course usually offered fall only. 
(Spring) — course usually offered spring only. 
(Summer) — course usually offered summer only. 
(Alt)— course usually offered only in alternate semes- 
ters or years. 
(Even, Odd)— course usually offered in even or odd 

semesters or years. 
(Occ)— course offered occasionally. 
Students should also be aware that regularly scheduled 
undergraduate classes for which fewer than ten students 
enroll (or graduate classes for which fewer than five students 
enroll) will be offered only with special approval of the Pro- 
vost. If enrollment does not justify continuation of a class, the 
class may not be offered that semester. 

Equivalent Course Credit/Cross-listed Courses 

A number of undergraduate courses have course content 
that is considered equivalent to other similar courses. Each 
semester a number of courses are cross-listed with courses 
taught in a different department. Ordinarily students can 
take only one of such cross-listed courses for credit. Cross- 
listed courses are indicated in parentheses following a course 
description ("Same as . . . "). Students should be aware of such 
equivalencies before registering in order to avoid taking a 
course for which they will not receive additional credit. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



57 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 

Courses listed below may also carry SI or WI markers for a given semester. See the Class Schedule in UNCGenie for complete 
General Education core and marker listings. For an alphabetical list by course prefix, see p. 76. 

Humanities and Fine Arts 

GEC requires 12 semester hours: one course from each category (GLT, GFA, and GPR), and one additional course from any of 
the three categories. 



Literature (GLT) 

Course Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



► 



CCI 227 


Comparative Studies in World Epics 


GLT 


GL 




CCI 228 


Comparative Studies in World Drama 


GLT 


GL 




CCI 305 


Classical Tragedy 


GLT 


GL 




CCI 324 


The Age of Cicero 


GLT 


GL 




CCI 325 


The Age of Augustus 


GLT 


GL 




CCI 326 


The Age of Nero 


GLT 


GL 




CHI 210 


Masterworks of Chinese Literature in Translation 


GLT 




GN 


ENG 104 


Approach to Literature 


GLT 






ENG 105 


Introduction to Narrative 


GLT 






ENG 106 


Introduction to Poetry 


GLT 






ENG 107 


Introduction to Drama 


GLT 






ENG 108 


Topics in British and American Literature 


GLT 






ENG 109 


Introduction to Shakespeare 


GLT 






ENG 110 


World Literature in English 


GLT 


GL 




ENG 201 


European Literary Classics: Ancient to Renaissance 


GLT 


GL 




ENG 202 


European Literary Classics: Enlightenment to Modern 


GLT 


GL 




ENG 204 


Non-Western Literary Classics 


GLT 




GN 


ENG 208 


Topics in Global Literature 


GLT 


GL 




ENG 209 


Topics in Non-Western Literature 


GLT 




GN 


ENG 210 


Literature and the Arts 


GLT 






ENG 211 


Major British Authors: Medieval to Neoclassical 


GLT 






ENG 212 


Major British Authors: Romantic to Modern 


GLT 






ENG 251 


Major American Authors: Colonial to Romantic 


GLT 






ENG 252 


Major American Authors: Realist to Modern 


GLT 






ENG 315 


Postcolonial Literatures 


GLT 






ENG 331 


Women in Literature 


GLT 






ENG 339 


Shakespeare: Early Plays and Sonnets 


GLT 






ENG 340 


Shakespeare: Later Plays 


GLT 






ENG 371 


Literary Study of the Bible 


GLT 


GL 




FMS 120 


Freshman Seminar in Literature 


GLT 






FMS 121 


Freshman Seminar in Literature— Global Perspectives 


GLT 


GL 




FMS 122 


Freshman Seminar in Literature — Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GLT 




GN 


FRE 222 


Explorations in French Literature: English Versions 


GLT 


GL 




FRE 323 


Albert Camus: English Versions 


GLT 


GL 




FRE 353 


Survey of French Literature 


GLT 






GER217 


Masterworks of German Literature Read in English 


GLT 


GL 




GER218 


Masterworks of German Literature Read in English 


GLT 


GL 




HSS 107 


First-Year Seminar in Literature 


GLT 






HSS117 


First-Year Seminar in Literature 


GLT 




GN 



58 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 

Literature (GLT), continued . . . 

Course I i 1 1 1 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



HSS 127 


First-Year Seminar in Literature 


GLT 


GL 




HSS 207 


Seminar in Literature 


GLT 






HSS 217 


Seminar in Literature 


GLT 




GN 


HSS 227 


Seminar in Literature 


GLT 


GL 




POR 222 


Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature 


GLT 




GN 


RCO 220-229 


Residential College Seminars in Literature 


GLT 






RCO 280-289 


Residential College Seminars in Literature 


GLT 






RUS 201 


Russian Literature in Translation 


GLT 




GN 


RUS 313 


Major Authors in Russian Literature 


GLT 




GN 


RUS 314 


Major Movements in Russian Literature and Culture 


GLT 




GN 


SPA 222 


Hispanic Masterpieces in English Translation 


GLT 


GL 




SPA 351 


Approaches to Hispanic Literature 


GLT 


GL 




SPA 402 


Spanish Literature I 


GLT 


GL 




SPA 403 


Spanish Literature II 


GLT 


GL 




SPA 404 


Spanish American Literature I 


GLT 




GN 


SPA 405 


Spanish American Literature II 


GLT 




GN 


THR 500 


Theatre History I 


GLT 






THR 501 


Theatre History II 


GLT 






Fine Arts (GFA) 

Course Title 


GE Core CAR Global 


Global/NW Lab 


ART 100 


Introduction to Art 


GFA 






ART 101 


Survey of Western Art 


GFA 






ART 103 


Survey of Visual Art in Non-Western Traditions 


GFA 




GN 


CCI 306 


Classical Comedy 


GFA 


GL 




CCI 312 


The Art and Archaeology of Egypt 


GFA 




GN 


DCE 101 


Introduction to Dance 


GFA 






DCE 200 


Dance Appreciation 


GFA 


GL 




FMS 130 


Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts 


GFA 






FMS 131 


Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts— Global Perspectives 


GFA 


GL 




FMS 132 


Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts— Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GFA 




GN 


HSS 105 


First-Year Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 






HSS 115 


First-Year Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 




GN 


HSS 125 


First-Year Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 


GL 




HSS 205 


Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 






HSS 215 


Seminar in the Fine Arts: Global Non-Western 


GFA 




GN 


HSS 225 


Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 


GL 




IAR221 


History and Theory of Design I 


GFA 


GL 




IAR 222 


History and Theory of Design II 


GFA 


GL 




IAR 321 


Design Perspectives 


GFA 


GL 




MST 101 


The Development of the Cinema 


GFA 






MST 225 


Masterpieces of Cinema 


GFA 






MST 226 


Masterpieces of Television Drama 


GFA 






MUS 214 


Jazz Appreciation 


GFA 







< 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



59 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 



Fine Arts (GFA), continued . . . 

Course Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



► 



MUS 241 


Music Appreciation 




GFA 


GL 




MUS 329 


History of Rock Music 




GFA 






MUS 332 


History of Western Music II 




GFA 


GL 




RCO 230-239 


Residential College Seminars in Fine Arts 




GFA 






THR 100 


Drama Appreciation 




GFA 






THR 130 


Fundamentals of Acting 




GFA 






THR 305 


Development of American Musical Theatre 




GFA 






THR 323 


The Arts as Human Experience 




GFA 






THR 502 


Theatre History III 




GFA 






Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives (GPR) 

Course Title 




GE Core CAR Global 


Global/NW Lab 


CCI 205 


Mythology 




GPR 


GL 




CCI 321 


The Archaic Age 




GPR 


GL 




CCI 340 


Ancient Cosmology 




GPR 


GL 




CCI 350 


Roman Law and Society 




GPR 


GL 




FMS 140 


Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical 


Principles 


GPR 






FMS 141 


Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical 
— Global Perspectives 


Principles 


GPR 


GL 




FMS 142 


Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical 
— Global Non-Western Perspectives 


Principles 


GPR 




GN 


HSS 106 


First-Year Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 






HSS 116 


First-Year Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 




GN 


HSS 126 


First-Year Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 


GL 




HSS 206 


Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 




GPR 






HSS 216 


Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 




GPR 




GN 


HSS 226 


Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 




GPR 


GL 




MUS 135 


Introduction to Musicology 




GPR 




GN 


MUS 343 


Music Cultures of the World 




GPR 




GN 


MUS 354 


Modern Asia Through Its Music 




GPR 




GN 


PHI 111 


Introduction to Philosophy 




GPR 






PHI 119 


Introduction to Ethics 




GPR 






PHI 121 


Contemporary Moral Problems 




GPR 






PHI 220 


Medical Ethics 




GPR 






PHI 331 


Social and Political Philosophy 




GPR 






PHI 336 


Philosophy of Crime and Punishment 




GPR 






PHI 338 


Ethics and International Affairs 




GPR 






PHI 359 


Philosophy of Religion 




GPR 






PHI 361 


Ethical Issues in Business 




GPR 




GN 


PSC 105 


Political Issues 




GPR 






PSC 270 


Introduction to Political Theory 




GPR 






PSY 380 


Psychology and the Law 




GPR 






RCO 210-219 


Residential College Seminars in Philosophical, Religious, 
and Ethical Principles 




GPR 






REL101 


Introduction to Religious Studies 




GPR 


GL 





60 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 

Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives (GPR), continued . . . 



Course 


Ti hi: 


GE Core CAR Global 


Globai./NW Lab 


REL 104 


Religion, Ritual, and the Arts 


GPR 


GL 




REL 109 


Religion and Contemporary Culture 


GPR 






REL 111 


Non-Western Religion 


GPR 




GN 


REL 201 


The Bible in Western Culture 


GPR 


GL 




REL 207 


Modern Problems of Belief 


GPR 






REL 209 


Elements of Christian Thought 


GPR 


GL 




REL 218 


Chinese Religion 


GPR 




GN 


REL 220 


Japanese Religion 


GPR 




GN 


REL 221 


Buddhism 


GPR 




GN 


REL 223 


Hinduism 


GPR 




GN 


REL 225 


Islam 


GPR 




GN 


REL 232 


American Religious Thought: A Survey 


GPR 






REL 248 


Comparative Religious Ethics 


GPR 




GN 


REL 250 


Religious Traditions and Care of Earth 


GPR 




GN 


REL 251 


Topics in Religious Social Ethics 


GPR 






REL 258 


Darwin, Evolution, and Human Nature 


GPR 






REL 259 


Philosophy of Religion 


GPR 






REL 327 


American Religious Thought II: The Romantic Tradition 


GPR 






WGS 350 


Introduction to Feminist Theories 


GPR 







Historical Perspectives — Western Culture (GHP) 

GEC requires one GHP course (3 s.h.). 
Course Title 



< 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



AFS 201 


Introduction to African American Studies 


GHP 


GMO 






CCI 201 


Introduction to Greek Civilization 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




CCI 202 


Introduction to Roman Civilization 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




CCI 211 


Introduction to Greek Archaeology 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




CCI 212 


Introduction to Roman Archaeology 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




CCI 240 


Ancient Warfare 


GHP 


GPM 






CRS 372 


Survey of Historic Costume 


GHP 


GMO 






FMS 150 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 






FMS 151 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern— Global Perspectives 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




FMS 152 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern— Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


FMS 160 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 






FMS 161 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Modern — Global Perspectives 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




FMS 162 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Modern — Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 203 


History of Africa to 1870 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


HIS 204 


History of Africa since 1870 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 206 


Topics in Premodern World History I 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 207 


Topics in Premodern World History II 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


HIS 208 


Topics in Modern World History I 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 





2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



ol 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 



Historical Perspectives — Western Culture (GHP), continued 

Course Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



► 



HIS 209 


Topics in Modern World History II 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 211 


The United States: A General Survey to 1865 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 212 


The United States: A General Survey since 1865 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 215 


The Civilizations of Asia 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


HIS 216 


The Civilizations of Asia 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 217 


The World in the Twentieth Century 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 218 


The World in the Twentieth Century 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 220 


The Ancient World 


GHP 


GPM 






HIS 221 


Medieval Legacy 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 222 


Europe 1400-1789 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 223 


Modern Europe 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HIS 239 


Latin America: Colonial Period 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 240 


Latin America: National Period 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 251 


The History of Western Science: A Survey 


GHP 


GPM 






HIS 252 


The History of Western Science: A Survey 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 301 


Race and Slavery 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 302 


Race and Segregation 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 311 


Darwin and the Theory of Evolution 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 327 


American Cultural History 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 335 


The American Colonial Period, 1607-1763 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 336 


The Age of the Democratic Revolution, 1764-1789 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 345 


The Unfit: Race Cleansing in the United States 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 360 


The Structure of Scientific Change: Topics in the History of Science 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 369 


History of Spain 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 371 


Europe since World War I 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HIS 373 


English History to 1660 


GHP 


GPM 






HIS 374 


British History 1688-Present 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 381 


The Near and Middle East 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HSS 101 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 






HSS 102 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 






HSS 111 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


HSS 112 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HSS 121 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HSS 122 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HSS 201 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 






HSS 202 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 






HSS 211 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


HSS 212 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HSS 221 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HSS 222 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




MUS 331 


History of Western Music I 


GHP 


GPM 






MUS 434 


American Music 


GHP 


GMO 






PHI 251 


History of Ancient Philosophy 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 





62 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 

Historical Perspectives — Western Culture (GHP), continued . . . 

Course Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



PHI 252 


History of Modern Philosophy 




GHP 


GMO 


GL 




RCO 108 


Residential College Core Course: 

The American Experience through 1890 (GHP GLT, GPR, or GSB), etc. 


GHP 


GPM 






RCO 109 


Residential College Core Course: 

The American Experience through 1890 (GHP GLT, GPR, or GSB), etc. 


GHP 


GMO 






RCO 208 


Residential College Core Course: 

The American Experience 1900 to present (GHP, GLT, GPR, 


or GSB), etc. 


GHP 


GPM 






RCO 209 


Residential College Core Course: 

The American Experience 1900 to present (GHP, GLT, GPR, 


or GSB), etc. 


GHP 


GMO 






RCO 240-244 


Historical Perspectives of Western Culture 




GHP 


GPM 






RCO 245-249 


Historical Perspectives of Western Culture 




GHP 


GMO 






REL 202 


Hebrew Scriptures 




GHP 


GPM 






REL 204 


New Testament and the Origins of Christianity 




GHP 


GPM 


GL 




REL 210 


Christianity to the Reformation 




GHP 


GPM 


GL 




REL 212 


Christianity from the Reformation to the Present 




GHP 


GMO 


GL 




REL 215 


Judaism 




GHP 


GPM 


GL 




REL 217 


The Synagogue 




GHP 


GPM 




GN 


REL 229 


Introduction to African American Religions 




GHP 


GMO 






REL 231 


Religion in America 




GHP 


GMO 






REL 240 


Modern Jewish Thought 




GHP 


GMO 


GL 




WCV 101 


Western Civilization 




GHP 


GPM 


GL 




WCV 102 


Western Civilization 




GHP 


GMO 


GL 




WGS 333 


Women in Non-Western Cultures 




GHP 


GMO 




GN 



^ 



Mathematics (GMT) 

GEC requires one GMT course (3 s.h.). 
Course Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



CSC 110 


Computational Problem Solving 


GMT 


FMS 195 


Freshman Seminar in Mathematics 


GMT 


MAT 112 


Contemporary Topics in Math 


GMT 


MAT 115 


College Algebra 


GMT 


MAT 120 


Calculus for Business and the Social Sciences 


GMT 


MAT 150 


Precalculus 1 


GMT 


MAT 151 


Precalculus 11 


GMT 


MAT 191 


Calculus I 


GMT 


RCO 110-119 


Residential College Seminars in Mathematics 


GMT 


STA 108 


Elementary Introduction to Probability and Statistics 


GMT 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



63 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 



Natural Sciences (GNS) 

GEC requires two GNS courses (6-7 s.h.): 

• each must have a different departmental prefix 

Course Title 



one must be a laboratory course 

GE Core CAR 



Global Global/NW Lab 



► 



AST 203 


Conceptual Astronomy 


GNS 


GPS 






AST 209 


Astronomy: The Solar System 


GNS 


GPS 






AST 235 


Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies 


GNS 


GPS 






ATY253 


Introduction to Physical Anthropology 


GNS 


GLS 






ATY 253L 


Introduction to Physical Anthropology Lab 








L 


BIO 105 


Major Concepts of Biology 


GNS 


GLS 






BIO 105L 


Major Concepts of Biology Laboratory 


GNS 


GLS 




L 


BIO 111 


Principles of Biology I 


GNS 


GLS 




L 


BIO 112 


Principles of Biology II 


GNS 


GLS 




L 


CHE 101 


Introductory Chemistry (formerly 106) 


GNS 


GPS 






CHE 103 


General Descriptive Chemistry I 


GNS 


GPS 






CHE 104 


General Descriptive Chemistry II 


GNS 


GPS 






CHE 110 


Introductory Chemistry Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


CHE 111 


General Chemistry I 


GNS 


GPS 






CHE 112 


General Chemistry I Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


CHE 114 


General Chemistry II 


GNS 


GPS 






CHE 115 


General Chemistry II Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


FMS 183 


Freshman Seminar in Physical Science 


GNS 


GPS 






FMS 183L 


Freshman Seminar in Physical Science Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


FMS 184 


Freshman Seminar in Life Science 


GNS 


GLS 






FMS 184L 


Freshman Seminar in Life Science Laboratory 


GNS 


GLS 




L 


GEO 103 


Introduction to Earth Science 


GNS 


GPS 






GEO 106 


Geosystems Science 


GNS 


GPS 






GEO 106L 


Geosystems Science Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


GEO 111 


Physical Geology 


GNS 


GPS 






GEOlllL 


Physical Geology Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


GEO 121 


Introduction to Geographic Information Science 


GNS 


GPS 






GEO 311 


Weather and Climate 


GNS 


GPS 






GE0311L 


Climatology Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


GEO 314 


Physical Geography: Landscape Processes 


GNS 


GPS 






GEO 314L 


Physical Geography Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


HSS 103 


First-Year Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 






HSS 104 


First-Year Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 






HSS 113 


First-Year Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 


GN 




HSS 114 


First-Year Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 


GN 




HSS 123 


First-Year Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS GL 






HSS 124 


First-Year Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS GL 






HSS 203 


Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 






HSS 204 


Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 






HSS 213 


Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 


GN 




HSS 214 


Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 


GN 





64 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 



Natural Sciences (GNS), continued . . . 



Course 



Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



HSS 223 


Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS GL 




HSS 224 


Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS GL 




NTR213 


Introductory Nutrition 


GNS 


GLS 




PHY 205 


Conceptual Physics 


GNS 


GPS 




PHY 205L 


Conceptual Physics Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 


L 


PHY 211 


General Physics I 


GNS 


GPS 


L 


PHY211A 


General Physics I 


GNS 


GPS 


L 


PHY 212 


General Physics II 


GNS 


GPS 


L 


PHY 212A 


General Physics II 


GNS 


GPS 


L 


PHY 291 


General Physics I with Calculus 


GNS 


GPS 


L 


PHY 292 


General Physics II with Calculus 


GNS 


GPS 


L 


PSY 230 


Biological Psychology 


GNS 


GLS 




RCO 250-254 


Residential College Seminars in Natural Science 


GNS 


GLS 




RCO 255-259 


Residential College Seminars in Natural Science 


GNS 


GPS 





Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 

GEC requires two GRD courses (6 s.h.)- 

Note: ENG 101, FMS 115, and RCO 101 are considered equivalent courses, and only one may be taken for credit. Additionally, ENG 102, 

FMS 116, and RCO 102 are considered equivalent courses, and only one may be taken for credit. 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR Global Global/NW Lab 


CCI 102 


The Classical Art of Persuasion 


GRD 


GL 


CST 105 


Introduction to Communication Studies 


GRD 




ENG 101 


English Composition I 


GRD 




ENG 101N 


English Composition I 


GRD 




ENG 102 


English Composition II 


GRD 




FMS 115 


Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse I 


GRD 




FMS 116 


Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse II 


GRD 




PHI 115 


Practical Reasoning 


GRD 




PHI 310 


Introduction to Formal Logic 


GRD 




PSY 318 


Belief in "Weird" Things 


GRD 




RCO 101 


English Composition I 


GRD 




RCO 102 


English Composition II 


GRD 





< 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



65 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 

Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 

GEC requires two GSB courses (6 s.h.). 

Course Title GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



► 



AFS 210 


Blacks in American Society: Social, Economic, and Political Perspectives 


GSB 






ATY100 


Contemporary Non-Western Cultures 


GSB 




GN 


ATY212 


General Anthropology 


GSB 




GN 


ATY213 


Cultural Anthropology 


GSB 




GN 


ATY258 


World Prehistory 


GSB 




GN 


BUS 201 


Creativity, Innovation, and Vision 


GSB 






CCI 207 


Ancient Sports and Society 


GSB 


GL 




CRS 221 


Culture, Human Behavior, and Clothing 


GSB 




GN 


CRS 321 


Social Psychology of Dress 


GSB 






ECO 101 


Introduction to Economics 


GSB 






ECO 201 


Principles of Microeconomics 


GSB 






ECO 202 


Principles of Macroeconomics 


GSB 






ENG 262 


Sociolinguistics 


GSB 






ENT 201 


Creativity, Innovation, and Vision 


GSB 






ESS 330 


Sociocultural Analyses of Sport and Exercise 


GSB 






FMS 170 


Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 






FMS 171 


Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 
— Global Perspectives 


GSB 


GL 




FMS 172 


Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 
— Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GSB 




GN 


GEO 104 


World Regional Geography 


GSB 


GL 




GEO 105 


Cultural Geography 


GSB 




GN 


GEO 301 


Urban Geography: Global Patterns 


GSB 


GL 




GEO 306 


World Economic Geography 


GSB 


GL 




GEO 344 


Geography of the United States and Canada 


GSB 






HDF211 


Life Span Development in the Human Environment 


GSB 






HDF 212 


Families and Close Relationships 


GSB 






HDF 302 


Infant and Child Development in the Family 


GSB 






HDF 303 


Adolescent Development in the Family 


GSB 






HEA 201 


Personal Health 


GSB 






HEA 260 


Human Sexuality 


GSB 






HSS 108 


First-Year Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 






HSS 118 


First-Year Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 




GN 


HSS 128 


First-Year Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 


GL 




HSS 138 


First-Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology 


GSB 




GN 


HSS 208 


Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 






HSS 218 


Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 




GN 


HSS 228 


Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 


GL 




LIN 262 


Sociolinguistics 


GSB 






MST 325 


Gender and Media Culture 


GSB 






PSC 100 


American Politics 


GSB 






PSC 210 


Introduction to Public Policy 


GSB 






PSC 240 


The International System 


GSB 


GL 





66 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Core Courses by Category 

Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB), continued . . . 

Course Title GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



PSC 260 


Introduction to Comparative Politics 


GSB 


GL 


PSY 121 


General Psychology 


GSB 




PSY 250 


Developmental Psychology 


GSB 




PSY 260 


Psychological Perspectives on Social Psychology 


GSB 




PSY 341 


Abnormal Psychology 


GSB 




RCO 270-279 


Residential College Seminars in Social and Behavioral Sciences 


GSB 




RPM 101 


Leisure and American Lifestyles 


GSB 




RPM 316 


Leisure for Older Adults 


GSB 




SES 200 


People with Disabilities in American Society 


GSB 




SES 240 


Communication Development in Children 


GSB 




SOC 101 


Introduction to Sociology 


GSB 




SOC 202 


Social Problems in Global Context 


GSB 


GL 


SOC 222 


Sociology of Deviant Behavior 


GSB 




SOC 227 


Race and Ethnic Relations 


GSB 




SWK311 


Human Behavior and Social Environment 


GSB 




WGS 250 


An Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies 


GSB 





M 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



67 



University Requirements 



General Education Marker Courses 



Global Perspectives (GL) 

GEC requires four Global perspectives courses, one of which must carry the GN marker. Courses listed below carry marker 
credit as designated on a permanent basis. 



► 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global Global/NW Lab 


ATY300 


The Culture of Baseball 






GL 




ATY325 


Caribbean Societies and Cultures 






GL 




ATY385 


Language and Culture 






GL 




CCI 102 


The Classical Art of Persuasion 


GRD 




GL 




CCI 201 


Introduction to Greek Civilization 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




CCI 202 


Introduction to Roman Civilization 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




CCI 205 


Mythology 


GPR 




GL 




CCI 206 


Classical Origins of the English Language 






GL 




CCI 207 


Ancient Sports and Society 


GSB 




GL 




CCI 211 


Introduction to Greek Archaeology 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




CCI 212 


Introduction to Roman Archaeology 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




CCI 227 


Comparative Studies in World Epics 


GLT 




GL 




CCI 228 


Comparative Studies in World Drama 


GLT 




GL 




CCI 305 


Classical Tragedy 


GLT 




GL 




CCI 306 


Classical Comedy 


GFA 




GL 




CCI 321 


The Archaic Age 


GPR 




GL 




CCI 324 


The Age of Cicero 


GLT 




GL 




CCI 325 


The Age of Augustus 


GLT 




GL 




CCI 326 


The Age of Nero 


GLT 




GL 




CCI 330 


Women in Antiquity 






GL 




CCI 340 


Ancient Cosmology 


GPR 




GL 




CCI 350 


Roman Law and Society 


GPR 




GL 




CCI 355 


The Roman Empire, 44 b.c.-a.d. 337 






GL 




CCI 407 


Roman Myth and Legend 






GL 




DCE 200 


Dance Appreciation 


GFA 




GL 




ECO 300 


International Economy 






GL 




ENG 110 


World Literature in English 


GLT 




GL 




ENG 201 


European Literary Classics: Ancient to Renaissance 


GLT 




GL 




ENG 202 


European Literary Classics: Enlightenment to Modern 


GLT 




GL 




ENG 208 


Topics in Global Literature 


GLT 




GL 




ENG 371 


Literary Study of the Bible 


GLT 




GL 




FMS 121 


Freshman Seminar in Literature— Global Perspectives 


GLT 




GL 




FMS 131 


Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts— Global Perspectives 


GFA 




GL 




FMS 141 


Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical Principles 
—Global Perspectives 


GPR 




GL 




FMS 151 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern— Global Perspectives 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




FMS 161 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Modern — Global Perspectives 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




FMS 171 


Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 
— Global Perspectives 


GSB 




GL 




FRE 101 


Beginning French I 






GL 




FRE 101B 


Beginning Business French 






GL 





68 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Marker Courses 

Global Perspectives (GL), continued . . . 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global Global/NW Lad 


FRE 102 


Beginning French II 






GL 




FRE 102B 


Beginning Business French 






GL 




FRE 203 


Intermediate French I 




GFL 


GL 




FRE 204 


Intermediate French II 




GFL 


GL 




FRE 222 


Explorations in French Literature: English Versions 


GLT 




GL 




FRE 232 


Images of France and the Francophone World 






GL 




FRE 241 


Intermediate French: Culture and Business 




GFL 


GL 




FRE 312 


French Conversation and Culture 






GL 




FRE 315 


Advanced Grammar and Composition 






GL 




FRE 323 


Albert Camus: English Versions 


GLT 




GL 




FRE 341 


Business French 






GL 




GEO 104 


World Regional Geography 


GSB 




GL 




GEO 3,01 


Urban Geography: Global Patterns 


GSB 




GL 




GEO 306 


World Economic Geography 


GSB 




GL 




GEO 333 


Geography of Europe 






GL 




GER 101 


Elementary German I 






GL 




GER101B 


Elementary Business German I 






GL 




GER 102 


Elementary German II 






GL 




GER 102B 


Elementary Business German II 






GL 




GER 203 


Intermediate German 




GFL 


GL 




GER 204 


Intermediate German Topics 




GFL 


GL 




GER 215 


German Civilization: Readings in English 






GL 




GER 216 


German Civilization: Readings in English 






GL 




GER 217 


Masterworks of German Literature Read in English 


GLT 




GL 




GER 218 


Masterworks of German Literature Read in English 


GLT 




GL 




GER 221 


Germanic Mythology: Readings in English 






GL 




GER 291 


German Conversation Topics 






GL 




GER 301 


German Conversation and Composition: Topics 






GL 




GER 305 


German Literature: Advanced Intermediate Topics 






GL 




GER 306 


German Culture: Advanced Intermediate Topics 






GL 




GER 306F 


German Culture: Advanced Intermediate Topics in German Film 






GL 




GER 308 


Topics in Central European Studies to 1918 






GL 




GER 309 


Topics in Central European Studies since 1918 






GL 




GER 311 


Business German 




GFL 


GL 




GER 404 


German Civilization: Research and/or Internet Projects 






GL 




GRK201 


Elementary Ancient Greek I 






GL 




GRK 202 


Elementary Ancient Greek II 






GL 




GRK 203 


Intermediate Ancient Greek I 




GFL 


GL 




GRK 204 


Intermediate Ancient Greek II 




GFL 


GL 




GRK 303 


Greek Drama 






GL 




GRK 304 


Greek Drama 






GL 




GRK 311 


The Greek Orators 






GL 




GRK 312 


Greek Historical Writers 






GL 





< 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



69 



University Requirements 



General Education Marker Courses 



Global Perspectives (GL), continued 



► 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global Global/NW Lab 


GRK313 


Greek Historical Writers 






GL 




GRK 341 


Homer 






GL 




HDF 410 


Families and Children in Global Perspective 






GL 




HIS 206 


Topics in Premodern World History I 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 208 


Topics in Modern World History I 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HIS 221 


Medieval Legacy 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 222 


Europe 1400-1789 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 223 


Modern Europe 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HIS 309 


Unity and Unrest in Medieval Towns 






GL 




HIS 310 


Daughters of Eve: Women in the Middle Ages 






GL 




HIS 349 


The World at War, 1939-1945 






GL 




HIS 355 


The Roman Empire, 44 b.c.-a.d. 337 






GL 




HIS 369 


History of Spain 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 371 


Europe since World War I 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HIS 375 


Germany in the Nineteenth Century: 1800-1914 






GL 




HIS 376 


German History, 1914-1945 






GL 




HIS 392 


The Holocaust: History and Meaning 






GL 




HIS 393 


Medieval Church and State 






GL 




HSS 121 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HSS 122 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HSS 123 


First-Year Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 


GL 




HSS 124 


First-Year Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 


GL 




HSS 125 


First-Year Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 




GL 




HSS 126 


First-Year Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 




GL 




HSS 127 


First-Year Seminar in Literature 


GLT 




GL 




HSS 128 


First-Year Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 




GL 




HSS 221 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HSS 222 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HSS 223 


Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 


GL 




HSS 224 


Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 


GL 




HSS 225 


Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 




GL 




HSS 226 


Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 




GL 




HSS 227 


Seminar in Literature 


GLT 




GL 




HSS 228 


Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 




GL 




HTM 245 


Cross-cultural Study Tour in Hospitality and Tourism 






GL 




HTM 251 


Multicultural Issues in Hospitality and Tourism 






GL 




IAR 221 


History and Theory of Design I 


GFA 




GL 




IAR 222 


History and Theory of Design II 


GFA 




GL 




IAR 321 


Design Perspectives 


GFA 




GL 




IAR 499 


International Field Studies in Interior Architecture 






GL 




IGS 233B 


International and Global Studies Seminar 






GL 




ITA 101 


Beginning Italian I 






GL 




ITA 102 


Beginning Italian II 






GL 





70 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Marker Courses 

Global Perspectives (GL), continued . . . 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global Globa 


i./NW Lab 


ITA 203 


Intermediate Italian I 




GFL 


GL 




ITA 204 


Intermediate Italian II 




GFL 


GL 




LAT 101 


Elementary Latin I 






GL 




LAT 102 


Elementary Latin II 






GL 




LAT 140 


Elementary Latin Review 






GL 




LAT 203 


Intermediate Latin I 




GFL 


GL 




LAT 204 


Intermediate Latin II 




GFL 


GL 




LAT 301 


Roman Lyric Poetry 






GL 




LAT 302 


Roman Letters and Men of Letters 






GL 




LAT 303 


Roman Drama 






GL 




LAT 311 


The Roman Orators 






GL 




LAT 312 


Roman Historians 






GL 




LAT 321 


Roman Satire 






GL 




LAT 401 


Vergil 






GL 




MGT 301 


Introduction to International Business 






GL 




MUS 241 


Music Appreciation 


GFA 




GL 




MUS 332 


History of Western Music II 


GFA 




GL 




MUS 333 


History of Western Music III 






GL 




MUS 375 


Opera Performance Techniques 






GL 




PHI 251 


History of Ancient Philosophy 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




PHI 252 


History of Modern Philosophy 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




POR 101 


Beginning Portuguese I 






GL 




POR 102 


Beginning Portuguese II 






GL 




POR 203 


Intermediate Portuguese I 




GFL 


GL 




POR 204 


Intermediate Portuguese II 




GFL 


GL 




PSC 240 


The International System 


GSB 




GL 




PSC 260 


Introduction to Comparative Politics 


GSB 




GL 




PSC 344 


Politics of Globalization 






GL 




RCO 108 


Residential College Core Course: The American Experience 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




REL 101 


Introduction to Religious Studies 


GPR 




GL 




REL 104 


Religion, Ritual, and the Arts 


GPR 




GL 




REL 201 


The Bible in Western Culture 


GPR 




GL 




REL 204 


New Testament and the Origins of Christianity 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




REL 209 


Elements of Christian Thought 


GPR 




GL 




REL 210 


Christianity to the Reformation 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




REL 212 


Christianity from the Reformation to the Present 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




REL 215 


Judaism 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




REL 240 


Modern Jewish Thought 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




SOC 202 


Social Problems in Global Context 


GSB 




GL 




SOC 323 


Global Deviance 






GL 




SOC 344 


Global Society 






GL 




SPA 100 


Spanish for Health Care 






GL 




SPA 101 


Beginning Spanish I 






GL 





< 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



71 



University Requirements 



General Education Marker Courses 



Global Perspectives (GL), continued 

Course Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



► 



SPA 101B 


Beginning Business Spanish 






GL 




SPA 102 


Beginning Spanish II 






GL 




SPA 102B 


Beginning Business Spanish 






GL 




SPA 203 


Intermediate Spanish I 




GFL 


GL 




SPA 204 


Intermediate Spanish II 




GFL 


GL 




SPA 222 


Hispanic Masterpieces in English Translation 


GLT 




GL 




SPA 233 


Hispanic Cultures and Civilizations 






GL 




SPA 240 


Intermediate Spanish I for Business 




GFL 


GL 




SPA 241 


Intermediate Spanish II for Business 




GFL 


GL 




SPA 301 


Advanced Spanish 






GL 




SPA 311 


Spanish Conversation 






GL 




SPA 315 


Intermediate Spanish Composition 






GL 




SPA 321 


Spanish in a Public School Setting 






GL 




SPA 332 


Introduction to Spanish Culture 






GL 




SPA 334 


Introduction to Spanish American Culture 






GL 




SPA 341 


Business Spanish 






GL 




SPA 351 


Approaches to Hispanic Literature 


GLT 




GL 




SPA 402 


Spanish Literature I 


GLT 




GL 




SPA 403 


Spanish Literature II 


GLT 




GL 




SPA 411 


Advanced Spanish Conversation 






GL 




SPA 415 


Advanced Spanish Composition 






GL 




SWK 522 


Comparative Study of Cross-cultural Social Work Practice 






GL 




WCV 101 


Western Civilization 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




WCV 102 


Western Civilization 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




Global Non-Western Perspectives (GN) 

Coursi- Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global 


Global/NW Lab 


ART 103 


Survey of Visual Art in Non-Western Traditions 


GFA 






GN 


ART 314 


African Art 








GN 


ATY100 


Contemporary Non-Western Cultures 


GSB 






GN 


ATY212 


General Anthropology 


GSB 






GN 


ATY213 


Cultural Anthropology 


GSB 






GN 


ATY258 


World Prehistory 


GSB 






GN 


ATY330 


Cultures of North American Indians 








GN 


ATY333 


Latin American Societies and Cultures 








GN 


ATY335 


Cultures of Africa 








GN 


ATY337 


Cultures of the Pacific 








GN 


ATY465 


An Overview of Medical Anthropology 








GN 


CCI 312 


The Art and Archaeology of Egypt 


GFA 






GN 


CHI 101 


Elementary Chinese I 








GN 


CHI 102 


Elementary Chinese II 








GN 


CHI 203 


Intermediate Chinese I 




GFL 




GN 


CHI 204 


Intermediate Chinese II 




GFL 




GN 



72 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Marker Courses 

Global Non-Western Perspectives (GN), continued . . . 



Course 


Title 




GE Core 


CAR Global Global/NW 


Lab 


CHI 210 


Masterworks of Chinese Literature in Translation 




GLT 




GN 




CHI 220 


Modern China 








GN 




CHI 301 


Third-Year Chinese Language 








GN 




CHI 302 


Third-Year Chinese Conversation and Composition 








GN 




CRS 221 


Culture, Human Behavior, and Clothing 




GSB 




GN 




DCE 205 


Dance History I: World Dance Traditions 








GN 




ECO 100 


Economic Development of the Non-Western World 








GN 




ENG 204 


Non-Western Literary Classics 




GLT 




GN 




ENG 209 


Topics in Non-Western Literature 




GLT 




GN 




FMS 122 


Freshman Seminar in Literature— Global Non-Western 


Perspectives 


GLT 




GN 




FMS 132 


Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts— Global Non-Western 


Perspectives 


GFA 




GN 




FMS 142 


Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical Principles 
—Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GPR 




GN 




FMS 152 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern — Global Non-Western Perspectives 




GHP 


GPM 


GN 




FMS 162 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Modern— Global Non-Western Perspectives 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




FMS 172 


Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 
—Global Non-Western Perspectives 




GSB 




GN 




GEO 105 


Cultural Geography 




GSB 




GN 




GEO 114 


The Geography of World Affairs 








GN 




GEO 303 


World Population Problems 








GN 




GEO 340 


Geography of East Asia 








GN 




HEA 207 


International Health 








GN 




HIS 203 


History of Africa to 1870 




GHP 


GPM 


GN 




HIS 204 


History of Africa since 1870 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HIS 207 


Topics in Premodern World History II 




GHP 


GPM 


GN 




HIS 209 


Topics in Modern World History II 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HIS 215 


The Civilizations of Asia 




GHP 


GPM 


GN 




HIS 216 


The Civilizations of Asia 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HIS 217 


The World in the Twentieth Century 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HIS 218 


The World in the Twentieth Century 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HIS 239 


Latin America: Colonial Period 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HIS 240 


Latin America: National Period 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HIS 320 


Central American History 








GN 




HIS 381 


The Near and Middle East 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HIS 383 


Chinese History to 1800 








GN 




HIS 384 


The Modern Transformation of China: 1800 to Present 


Day 






GN 




HSS 111 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 


GN 




HSS 112 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 




GHP 


GMO 


GN 




HSS 113 


First-Year Seminar in the Physical Sciences 




GNS 


GPS 


GN 




HSS 114 


First-Year Seminar in the Life Sciences 




GNS 


GLS 


GN 




HSS 115 


First-Year Seminar in the Fine Arts 




GFA 




GN 




HSS 116 


First-Year Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 




GN 




HSS 117 


First-Year Seminar in Literature 




GLT 




GN 





M 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



73 



University Requirements 



General Education Marker Courses 



Global Non-Western Perspectives (GN), continued 



► 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR Global Global/NW Lab 


HSS118 


First-Year Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 




GN 


HSS 138 


First-Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology 


GSB 




GN 


HSS211 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 


GN 


HSS 212 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 


GN 


HSS 213 


Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 


GN 


HSS 214 


Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 


GN 


HSS 215 


Seminar the Fine Arts: Global Non-Western 


GFA 




GN 


HSS 216 


Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 




GN 


HSS 217 


Seminar in Literature 


GLT 




GN 


HSS 218 


Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 




GN 


IGS 233A 


International and Global Studies Seminar 






GN 


JNS 101 


Elementary Japanese 






GN 


JNS 102 


Elementary Japanese 






GN 


JNS 203 


Intermediate Japanese 




GFL 


GN 


JNS 204 


Intermediate Japanese 




GFL 


GN 


JNS 220 


Modern Japan 






GN 


JNS 301 


Advanced Grammar and Conversation 






GN 


JNS 305 


Topics in Japanese Culture 






GN 


MUS 135 


Introduction to Musicology 


GPR 




GN 


MUS 343 


Music Cultures of the World 


GPR 




GN 


MUS 354 


Modern Asia Through Its Music 


GPR 




GN 


MUS 425 


Music of Sub-Saharan Africa 






GN 


MUS 468 


Teaching Music in a Multicultural Population 






GN 


NUR 390 


Culture and Health Care 






GN 


PHI 361 


Ethical Issues in Business 


GPR 




GN 


POR 222 


Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature 


GLT 




GN 


POR 233 


Topics in Brazilian Culture and Civilization 






GN 


PSC 290 


The Politics of the Non-Western World 






GN 


PSC 355J 


Middle East Politics 






GN 


PSC 391 


African Political Systems 






GN 


RCO 260-269 


Selected Topics 






GN 


REL111 


Non-Western Religion 


GPR 




GN 


REL217 


The Synagogue 


GHP 


GPM 


GN 


REL218 


Chinese Religion 


GPR 




GN 


REL 220 


Japanese Religion 


GPR 




GN 


REL221 


Buddhism 


GPR 




GN 


REL 223 


Hinduism 


GPR 




GN 


REL 225 


Islam 


GPR 




GN 


REL 250 


Religious Traditions and Care of Earth 


GPR 




GN 


REL 248 


Comparative Religious Ethics 


GPR 




GN 


REL 254 


Religion in Traditional Societies 






GN 


RUS101 


Elementary Russian I 






GN 


RUS 102 


Elementary Russian II 






GN 



74 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Marker Courses 

Global Non-Western Perspectives (GN), continued . 

Course Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



RUS 201 


Russian Literature in Translation 


GLT 




GN 


RUS 202 


Russian Literature in Translation 






GN 


RUS 203 


Intermediate Russian 




GFL 


GN 


RUS 204 


Intermediate Russian 




GFL 


GN 


RUS 306 


Slavic Life and Letters: Topics 






GN 


RUS 313 


Major Authors in Russian Literature 


GLT 




GN 


RUS 314 


Major Movements in Russian Literature and Culture 


GLT 




GN 


SOC 300 


Post Soviet Societies 






GN 


SOC 375 


International Field Research 






GN 


SPA 404 


Spanish American Literature I 


GLT 




GN 


SPA 405 


Spanish American Literature II 


GLT 




GN 


THR 506 


Non-Western Theatre and/or Film 






GN 


WGS 333 


Women in Non-Western Cultures 


GHP 


GMO 


GN 



M 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



75 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 

GE Core Category Codes 

GLT— Literature I GFA — Fine Arts I GPR— Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives I GHP— Historical Perspectives 
GMT— Mathematics I GNS— Natural Sciences I GRD— Reasoning & Discourse I GSB— Social & Behavioral Sciences 

CAR Codes 1 

GFL— Foreign Language I GPM— Historical Perspectives— Premodern I GMO— Historical Perspectives— Modern 
GLS— Natural Sciences — Life I GPS— Natural Sciences— Physical 

GE Marker Codes 

GL— Global Perspectives I GN — Global Non-Western Perspectives I WI— Writing Intensive 2 I SI— Speaking Intensive 2 

Additional Course Information Abbreviations 2 

L-Lab 

The following list includes courses that are approved for the noted credit status and which will carry the designated markers 

for all sections for 2009-10. 

J CAR codes (College Additional Requirements) are for use only by students pursuing majors in the College of Arts and Sciences; see chapter 6. 

'-Writing Intensive (WI) and Speaking Intensive (SI) courses are not indicated on this table; refer to the Class Schedule in UNCGenie for a 

listing of courses taught as SI or WIfor a given semester. 

Course Title GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



► 



AFS 201 


Introduction to African American Studies 


GHP 


GMO 








AFS 210 


Blacks in American Society: Social, Economic, and Political Perspectives 


GSB 










ART 100 


Introduction to Art 


GFA 










ART 101 


Survey of Western Art 


GFA 










ART 103 


Survey of Visual Art in Non-Western Traditions 


GFA 






GN 




ART 314 


African Art 








GN 




AST 203 


Conceptual Astronomy 


GNS 


GPS 








AST 209 


Astronomy: The Solar System 


GNS 


GPS 








AST 235 


Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies 


GNS 


GPS 








ATY100 


Contemporary Non-Western Cultures 


GSB 






GN 




ATY212 


General Anthropology 


GSB 






GN 




ATY213 


Cultural Anthropology 


GSB 






GN 




ATY253 


Introduction to Physical Anthropology 


GNS 


GLS 








ATY 253L 


Introduction to Physical Anthropology Lab 










L 


ATY258 


World Prehistory 


GSB 






GN 




ATY 300 


The Culture of Baseball 






GL 






ATY 325 


Caribbean Societies and Cultures 






GL 






ATY 330 


Cultures of North American Indians 








GN 




ATY 333 


Latin American Societies and Cultures 








GN 




ATY 335 


Cultures of Africa 








GN 




ATY 337 


Cultures of the Pacific 








GN 




ATY 385 


Language and Culture 






GL 






ATY 465 


An Overview of Medical Anthropology 








GN 




BIO 105 


Major Concepts of Biology 


GNS 


GLS 








BIO 105L 


Major Concepts of Biology Laboratory 


GNS 


GLS 






L 


BIO 111 


Principles of Biology I 


GNS 


GLS 






L 


BIO 112 


Principles of Biology II 


GNS 


GLS 






L 


BUS 201 


Creativity, Innovation, and Vision 


GSB 










CCI 102 


The Classical Art of Persuasion 


GRD 




GL 






CCI 201 


Introduction to Greek Civilization 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 






CCI 202 


Introduction to Roman Civilization 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 







76 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global 


Global/NW 


Lab 


CCI 205 


Mythology 


GPR 




GL 






CCI 206 


Classical Origins of the English Language 






GL 






CCI 207 


Ancient Sports and Society 


GSB 




GL 






CCI 211 


Introduction to Greek Archaeology 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 






CCI 212 


Introduction to Roman Archaeology 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 






CCI 227 


Comparative Studies in World Epics 


GLT 




GL 






CCI 228 


Comparative Studies in World Drama 


GLT 




GL 






CCI 240 


Ancient Warfare 


GHP 


GPM 








CCI 305 


Classical Tragedy 


GLT 




GL 






CCI 306 


Classical Comedy 


GFA 




GL 






CCI 312 


The Art and Archaeology of Egypt 


GFA 






GN 




CCI 321 


The Archaic Age 


GPR 




GL 






CCI 324 


The Age of Cicero 


GLT 




GL 






CCI 325 


The Age of Augustus 


GLT 




GL 






CCI 326 


The Age of Nero 


GLT 




GL 






CCI 330 


Women in Antiquity 






GL 






CCI 340 


Ancient Cosmology 


GPR 




GL 






CCI 350 


Roman Law and Society 


GPR 




GL 






CCI 355 


The Roman Empire, 44 b.c.-a.d. 337 






GL 






CCI 407 


Roman Myth and Legend 






GL 






CHE 101 


Introductory Chemistry (formerly 106) 


GNS 


GPS 








CHE 103 


General Descriptive Chemistry I 


GNS 


GPS 








CHE 104 


General Descriptive Chemistry II 


GNS 


GPS 








CHE 110 


Introductory Chemistry Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 






L 


CHE 111 


General Chemistry I 


GNS 


GPS 








CHE 112 


General Chemistry I Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 






L 


CHE 114 


General Chemistry II 


GNS 


GPS 








CHE 115 


General Chemistry II Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 






L 


CHI 101 


Elementary Chinese I 








GN 




CHI 102 


Elementary Chinese II 








GN 




CHI 203 


Intermediate Chinese I 




GFL 




GN 




CHI 204 


Intermediate Chinese II 




GFL 




GN 




CHI 210 


Masterworks of Chinese Literature in Translation 


GLT 






GN 




CHI 220 


Modern China 








GN 




CHI 301 


Third-Year Chinese Language 








GN 




CHI 302 


Third-Year Chinese Conversation and Composition 








GN 




CRS 221 


Culture, Human Behavior, and Clothing 


GSB 






GN 




CRS 321 


Social Psychology of Dress 


GSB 










CRS 372 


Survey of Historic Costume 


GHP 


GMO 








CSC 110 


Computational Problem Solving 


GMT 










CST 105 


Introduction to Communication Studies 


GRD 










DCE 101 


Introduction to Dance 


GFA 










DCE 200 


Dance Appreciation 


GFA 




GL 






DCE 205 


Dance History I: World Dance Traditions 








GN 




ECO 100 


Economic Development of the Non-Western World 








GN 





M 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



77 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



► 



Course 


Title 




GE Core CAR Global 


Global/NW Lab 


ECO 101 


Introduction to Economics 




GSB 






ECO 201 


Principles of Microeconomics 




GSB 






ECO 202 


Principles of Macroeconomics 




GSB 






ECO 300 


International Economy 






GL 




ENG 101 


English Composition I 




GRD 






ENG 101N 


English Composition I 




GRD 






ENG 102 


English Composition II 




GRD 






ENG 104 


Approach to Literature 




GLT 






ENG 105 


Introduction to Narrative 




GLT 






ENG 106 


Introduction to Poetry 




GLT 






ENG 107 


Introduction to Drama 




GLT 






ENG 108 


Topics in British and American Literature 




GLT 






ENG 109 


Introduction to Shakespeare 




GLT 






ENG 110 


World Literature in English 




GLT 


GL 




ENG 201 


European Literary Classics: Ancient to Renaissance 




GLT 


GL 




ENG 202 


European Literary Classics: Enlightenment to Modern 




GLT 


GL 




ENG 204 


Non-Western Literary Classics 




GLT 




GN 


ENG 208 


Topics in Global Literature 




GLT 


GL 




ENG 209 


Topics in Non-Western Literature 




GLT 




GN 


ENG 210 


Literature and the Arts 




GLT 






ENG 211 


Major British Authors: Medieval to Neoclassical 




GLT 






ENG 212 


Major British Authors: Romantic to Modern 




GLT 






ENG 251 


Major American Authors: Colonial to Romantic 




GLT 






ENG 252 


Major American Authors: Realist to Modern 




GLT 






ENG 262 


Sociolinguistics 




GSB 






ENG 315 


Postcolonial Literatures 




GLT 






ENG 331 


Women in Literature 




GLT 






ENG 339 


Shakespeare: Early Plays and Sonnets 




GLT 






ENG 340 


Shakespeare: Later Plays 




GLT 






ENG 371 


Literary Study of the Bible 




GLT 


GL 




ENT 201 


Creativity, Innovation, and Vision 




GSB 






ESS 330 


Sociocultural Analyses of Sport and Exercise 




GSB 






FMS115 


Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse I 




GRD 






FMS116 


Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse II 




GRD 






FMS 120 


Freshman Seminar in Literature 




GLT 






FMS 121 


Freshman Seminar in Literature — Global Perspectives 




GLT 


GL 




FMS 122 


Freshman Seminar in Literature — Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GLT 




GN 


FMS 130 


Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts 




GFA 






FMS 131 


Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts — Global Perspectives 




GFA 


GL 




FMS 132 


Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts — Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GFA 




GN 


FMS 140 


Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical 


Principles 


GPR 






FMS 141 


Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical 
— Global Perspectives 


Principles 


GPR 


GL 




FMS 142 


Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and Ethical 
— Global Non-Western Perspectives 


Principles 


GPR 




GN 


FMS 150 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 




GHP GPM 





78 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


( i] OISAl 


Gi.obai./NW Lab 


FMS 151 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern— Global Perspectives 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




FMS 152 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern— Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


FMS 160 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 






FMS 161 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Modern— Global Perspectives 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




FMS 162 


Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Modern— Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


FMS 170 


Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 








FMS 171 


Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 
—Global Perspectives 


GSB 




GL 




FMS 172 


Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 
—Global Non-Western Perspectives 


GSB 






GN 


FMS 183 


Freshman Seminar in Physical Science 


GNS 


GPS 






FMS 183L 


Freshman Seminar in Physical Science Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


FMS 184 


Freshman Seminar in Life Science 


GNS 


GLS 






FMS 184L 


Freshman Seminar in Life Science Laboratory 


GNS 


GLS 




L 


FMS 195 


Freshman Seminar in Mathematics 


GMT 








FRE 101 


Beginning French I 






GL 




FRE 101B 


Beginning Business French 






GL 




FRE 102 


Beginning French II 






GL 




FRE 102B 


Beginning Business French 






GL 




FRE 203 


Intermediate French I 




GFL 


GL 




FRE 204 


Intermediate French II 




GFL 


GL 




FRE 222 


Explorations in French Literature: English Versions 


GLT 




GL 




FRE 232 


Images of France and the Francophone World 






GL 




FRE 241 


Intermediate French: Culture and Business 




GFL 


GL 




FRE 312 


French Conversation and Culture 






GL 




FRE 315 


Advanced Grammar and Composition 






GL 




FRE 323 


Albert Camus: English Versions 


GLT 




GL 




FRE 341 


Business French 






GL 




FRE 353 


Survey of French Literature 


GLT 








GEO 103 


Introduction to Earth Science 


GNS 


GPS 






GEO 104 


World Regional Geography 


GSB 




GL 




GEO 105 


Cultural Geography 


GSB 






GN 


GEO 106 


Geosystems Science 


GNS 


GPS 






GEO 106L 


Geosystems Science Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


GEO 111 


Physical Geology 


GNS 


GPS 






GEOlllL 


Physical Geology Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


GEO 114 


The Geography of World Affairs 








GN 


GEO 121 


Introduction to Geographic Information Science 


GNS 


GPS 






GEO 301 


Urban Geography: Global Patterns 


GSB 




GL 




GEO 303 


World Population Problems 








GN 


GEO 306 


World Economic Geography 


GSB 




GL 




GEO 311 


Weather and Climate 


GNS 


GPS 






GE0 311L 


Climatology Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


GEO 314 


Physical Geography: Landscape Processes 


GNS 


GPS 







M 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



79 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 

Course Title 



GE Core CAR Global Global/NW Lab 



► 



GEO 314L 


Physical Geography Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 






L 


GEO 333 


Geography of Europe 






GL 






GEO 340 


Geography of East Asia 








GN 




GEO 344 


Geography of the United States and Canada 


GSB 










GER 101 


Elementary German I 






GL 






GER101B 


Elementary Business German I 






GL 






GER 102 


Elementary German II 






GL 






GER 102B 


Elementary Business German II 






GL 






GER 203 


Intermediate German 




GFL 


GL 






GER 204 


Intermediate German Topics 




GFL 


GL 






GER 215 


German Civilization: Readings in English 






GL 






GER 216 


German Civilization: Readings in English 






GL 






GER 217 


Masterworks of German Literature Read in English 


GLT 




GL 






GER 218 


Masterworks of German Literature Read in English 


GLT 




GL 






GER 221 


Germanic Mythology: Readings in English 






GL 






GER 291 


German Conversation Topics 






GL 






GER 301 


German Conversation and Composition: Topics 






GL 






GER 305 


German Literature: Advanced Intermediate Topics 






GL 






GER 306 


German Culture: Advanced Intermediate Topics 






GL 






GER 306F 


German Culture: Advanced Intermediate Topics in German Film 






GL 






GER 308 


Topics in Central European Studies to 1918 






GL 






GER 309 


Topics in Central European Studies since 1918 






GL 






GER 311 


Business German 




GFL 


GL 






GER 404 


German Civilization: Research and/or Internet Projects 






GL 






GRK 201 


Elementary Ancient Greek I 






GL 






GRK 202 


Elementary Ancient Greek II 






GL 






GRK 203 


Intermediate Ancient Greek I 




GFL 


GL 






GRK 204 


Intermediate Ancient Greek II 




GFL 


GL 






GRK 303 


Greek Drama 






GL 






GRK 304 


Greek Drama 






GL 






GRK 311 


The Greek Orators 






GL 






GRK 312 


Greek Historical Writers 






GL 






GRK 313 


Greek Historical Writers 






GL 






GRK 341 


Homer 






GL 






HDF211 


Life Span Development in the Human Environment 


GSB 










HDF212 


Families and Close Relationships 


GSB 










HDF 302 


Infant and Child Development in the Family 


GSB 










HDF 303 


Adolescent Development in the Family 


GSB 










HDF 410 


Families and Children in Global Perspective 






GL 






HEA 201 


Personal Health 


GSB 










HEA 207 


International Health 








GN 




HEA 260 


Human Sexuality 


GSB 










HIS 203 


History of Africa to 1870 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 




HIS 204 


History of Africa since 1870 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 




HIS 206 


Topics in Premodern World History I 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 







80 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global 


Global/NW Lab 


HIS 207 


Topics in Premodern World History II 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


HIS 208 


Topics in Modern World History I 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HIS 209 


Topics in Modern World History II 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 211 


The United States: A General Survey to 1865 


GHP 


CMC) 






HIS 212 


The United States: A General Survey since 1865 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 215 


The Civilizations of Asia 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


HIS 216 


The Civilizations of Asia 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 217 


The World in the Twentieth Century 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 218 


The World in the Twentieth Century 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 220 


The Ancient World 


GHP 


GPM 






HIS 221 


Medieval Legacy 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 222 


Europe 1400-1789 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 223 


Modern Europe 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HIS 239 


Latin America: Colonial Period 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 240 


Latin America: National Period 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 251 


The History of Western Science: A Survey 


GHP 


GPM 






HIS 252 


The History of Western Science: A Survey 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 301 


Race and Slavery 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 302 


Race and Segregation 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 309 


Unity and Unrest in Medieval Towns 






GL 




HIS 310 


Daughters of Eve: Women in the Middle Ages 






GL 




HIS 311 


Darwin and the Theory of Evolution 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 320 


Central American History 








GN 


HIS 327 


American Cultural History 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 335 


The American Colonial Period, 1607-1763 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 336 


The Age of the Democratic Revolution, 1764-1789 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 345 


The Unfit: Race Cleansing in the United States 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 349 


The World at War, 1939-1945 






GL 




HIS 355 


The Roman Empire, 44 b.c.-a.d. 337 






GL 




HIS 360 


The Structure of Scientific Change: Topics in the History of Science 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 369 


History of Spain 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HIS 371 


Europe since World War I 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HIS 373 


English History to 1660 


GHP 


GPM 






HIS 374 


British History 1688-Present 


GHP 


GMO 






HIS 375 


Germany in the Nineteenth Century: 1800-1914 






GL 




HIS 376 


German History, 1914-1945 






GL 




HIS 381 


The Near and Middle East 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HIS 383 


Chinese History to 1800 








GN 


HIS 384 


The Modern Transformation of China: 1800 to Present Day 








GN 


HIS 392 


The Holocaust: History and Meaning 






GL 




HIS 393 


Medieval Church and State 






GL 




HSS 101 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 






HSS 102 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 






HSS 103 


First-Year Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 






HSS 104 


First-Year Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 







A 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



81 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



► 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global 


Global/NW Lab 


HSS 105 


First-Year Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 








HSS 106 


First-Year Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 








HSS 107 


First-Year Seminar in Literature 


GLT 








HSS 108 


First-Year Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 








HSS 111 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GUI' 


GPM 




GN 


HSS 112 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HSS 113 


First-Year Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 




GN 


HSS 114 


First-Year Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 




GN 


HSS 115 


First-Year Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 






GN 


HSS 116 


First-Year Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 






GN 


HSS 117 


First-Year Seminar in Literature 


GLT 






GN 


HSS 118 


First-Year Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 






GN 


HSS 121 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HSS 122 


First-Year Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HSS 123 


First-Year Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 


GL 




HSS 124 


First-Year Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 


GL 




HSS 125 


First-Year Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 




GL 




HSS 126 


First-Year Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 




GL 




HSS 127 


First-Year Seminar in Literature 


GLT 




GL 




HSS 128 


First-Year Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 




GL 




HSS 138 


First-Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology 


GSB 






GN 


HSS 201 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 






HSS 202 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 






HSS 203 


Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 






HSS 204 


Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 






HSS 205 


Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 








HSS 206 


Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 








HSS 207 


Seminar in Literature 


GLT 








HSS 208 


Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 








HSS 211 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 


HSS 212 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modem 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


HSS 213 


Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 




GN 


HSS 214 


Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 




GN 


HSS 215 


Seminar in the Fine Arts: Global Non-Western 


GFA 






GN 


HSS 216 


Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 






GN 


HSS 217 


Seminar in Literature 


GLT 






GN 


HSS 218 


Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 






GN 


HSS 221 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




HSS 222 


Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




HSS 223 


Seminar in the Physical Sciences 


GNS 


GPS 


GL 




HSS 224 


Seminar in the Life Sciences 


GNS 


GLS 


GL 




HSS 225 


Seminar in the Fine Arts 


GFA 




GL 




HSS 226 


Seminar in Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Principles 


GPR 




GL 




HSS 227 


Seminar in Literature 


GLT 




GL 




HSS 228 


Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 


GSB 




GL 





82 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global 


Global/NW Lab 


HTM 245 


Cross-cultural Study Tour in Hospitality and Tourism 






GL 




HTM 251 


Multicultural Issues in Hospitality and Tourism 






GL 




IAR 221 


History and Theory of Design I 


GFA 




GL 




IAR 222 


History and Theory of Design II 


GFA 




GL 




IAR 321 


Design Perspectives 


GFA 




GL 




IAR 499 


International Field Studies in Interior Architecture 






GL 




IGS 233A 


International and Global Studies Seminar 








GN 


IGS 233B 


International and Global Studies Seminar 






GL 




ITA 101 


Beginning Italian I 






GL 




ITA 102 


Beginning Italian II 






GL 




ITA 203 


Intermediate Italian I 




GFL 


GL 




ITA 204 


Intermediate Italian II 




GFL 


GL 




JNS 101 


Elementary Japanese 








GN 


JNS 102 


Elementary Japanese 








GN 


JNS 203 


Intermediate Japanese 




GFL 




GN 


JNS 204 


Intermediate Japanese 




GFL 




GN 


JNS 220 


Modern Japan 








GN 


JNS 301 


Advanced Grammar and Conversation 








GN 


JNS 305 


Topics in Japanese Culture 








GN 


LAT 101 


Elementary Latin I 






GL 




LAT 102 


Elementary Latin II 






GL 




LAT 140 


Elementary Latin Review 






GL 




LAT 203 


Intermediate Latin I 




GFL 


GL 




LAT 204 


Intermediate Latin II 




GFL 


GL 




LAT 301 


Roman Lyric Poetry 






GL 




LAT 302 


Roman Letters and Men of Letters 






GL 




LAT 303 


Roman Drama 






GL 




LAT 311 


The Roman Orators 






GL 




LAT 312 


Roman Historians 






GL 




LAT 321 


Roman Satire 






GL 




LAT 401 


Vergil 






GL 




LIN 262 


Sociolinguisrics 


GSB 








MAT 112 


Contemporary Topics in Math 


GMT 








MAT 115 


College Algebra 


GMT 








MAT 120 


Calculus for Business and the Social Sciences 


GMT 








MAT 150 


Precalculus I 


GMT 








MAT 151 


Precalculus II 


GMT 








MAT 191 


Calculus I 


GMT 








MGT 301 


Introduction to International Business 






GL 




MST 101 


The Development of the Cinema 


GFA 








MST 225 


Masterpieces of Cinema 


GFA 








MST 226 


Masterpieces of Television Drama 


GFA 








MST 325 


Gender and Media Culture 


GSB 








MUS135 


Introduction to Musicology 


GPR 






GN 


MUS 214 


Jazz Appreciation 


GFA 









< 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



83 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



► 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global 


Global/NW Lab 


MUS 241 


Music Appreciation 


GFA 




GL 




MUS 329 


History of Rock Music 


GFA 








MUS 331 


History of Western Music I 


GHP 


GPM 






MUS 332 


History of Western Music II 


GFA 




GL 




MUS 333 


History of Western Music III 






GL 




MUS 343 


Music Cultures of the World 


GPR 






GN 


MUS 354 


Modern Asia Through Its Music 


GPR 






GN 


MUS 375 


Opera Performance Techniques 






GL 




MUS 425 


Music of Sub-Saharan Africa 








GN 


MUS 434 


American Music 


GHP 


GMO 






MUS 468 


Teaching Music in a Multicultural Population 








GN 


NTR 213 


Introductory Nutrition 


GNS 


GLS 






NUR 390 


Culture and Health Care 








GN 


PHI 111 


Introduction to Philosophy 


GPR 








PHI 115 


Practical Reasoning 


GRD 








PHI 119 


Introduction to Ethics 


GPR 








PHI 121 


Contemporary Moral Problems 


GPR 








PHI 220 


Medical Ethics 


GPR 








PHI 251 


History of Ancient Philosophy 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




PHI 252 


History of Modern Philosophy 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




PHI 310 


Introduction to Formal Logic 


GRD 








PHI 331 


Social and Political Philosophy 


GPR 








PHI 336 


Philosophy of Crime and Punishment 


GPR 








PHI 338 


Ethics and International Affairs 


GPR 








PHI 359 


Philosophy of Religion 


GPR 








PHI 361 


Ethical Issues in Business 


GPR 






GN 


PHY 205 


Conceptual Physics 


GNS 


GPS 






PHY 205L 


Conceptual Physics Laboratory 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


PHY 211 


General Physics I 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


PHY 211 A 


General Physics I 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


PHY 212 


General Physics II 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


PHY 21 2A 


General Physics II 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


PHY 291 


General Physics I with Calculus 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


PHY 292 


General Physics II with Calculus 


GNS 


GPS 




L 


POR 101 


Beginning Portuguese I 






GL 




POR 102 


Beginning Portuguese II 






GL 




POR 203 


Intermediate Portuguese I 




GFL 


GL 




POR 204 


Intermediate Portuguese II 




GFL 


GL 




POR 222 


Introduction to Luso-Brazilian Literature 


GLT 






GN 


POR 233 


Topics in Brazilian Culture and Civilization 








GN 


PSC 100 


American Politics 


GSB 








PSC 105 


Political Issues 


GPR 








PSC 210 


Introduction to Public Policy 


GSB 








PSC 240 


The International System 


GSB 




GL 




PSC 260 


Introduction to Comparative Politics 


GSB 




GL 





84 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



Course 




Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global < 


2lobal/NV\ 


Lab 


PSC 270 




Introduction to Political Theory 


GPR 










PSC 290 




The Politics of the Non-Western World 








GN 




PSC 344 




Politics of Globalization 






GL 






PSC 355] 




Middle East Politics 








GN 




PSC 391 




African Political Systems 








GN 




PSY 121 




General Psychology 


GSB 










PSY 230 




Biological Psychology 


GNS 


GLS 








PSY 250 




Developmental Psychology 


GSB 










PSY 260 




Psychological Perspectives on Social Psychology 


GSB 










PSY 318 




Belief in "Weird" Things 


GRD 










PSY 341 




Abnormal Psychology 


GSB 










PSY 380 




Psychology and the Law 


GPR 










RCO 101 




English Composition 1 


GRD 










RCO 102 




English Composition II 


GRD 










RCO 108 




Residential College Core Course: 

The American Experience through 1890 (GHP, GLT, GPR, or GSB), etc. 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 






RCO 109 




Residential College Core Course: 

The American Experience through 1890 (GHP, GLT, GPR, or GSB), etc. 


GHP 


GMO 








RCO 110- 


■119 


Residential College Seminars in Mathematics 


GMT 










RCO 208 




Residential College Core Course: 

The American Experience 1900 to present (GHP, GLT, GPR, or GSB), etc. 


GHP 


GPM 








RCO 209 




Residential College Core Course: 

The American Experience 1900 to present (GHP, GLT, GPR, or GSB), etc. 


GHP 


GMO 








RCO 210- 


■219 


Residential College Seminars in Philosophical, Religious, 
and Ethical Principles 


GPR 










RCO 220- 


■229 


Residential College Seminars in Literature 


GLT 










RCO 230- 


■239 


Residential College Seminars in Fine Arts 


GFA 










RCO 240- 


-244 


Historical Perspectives of Western Culture 


GHP 


GPM 








RCO 245- 


-249 


Historical Perspectives of Western Culture 


GHP 


GMO 








RCO 250- 


-254 


Residential College Seminars in Natural Science 


GNS 


GLS 








RCO 255- 


-259 


Residential College Seminars in Natural Science 


GNS 


GPS 








RCO 260- 


-269 


Selected Topics 








GN 




RCO 270- 


-279 


Residential College Seminars in Social and Behavioral Sciences 


GSB 










RCO 280- 


-289 


Residential College Seminars in Literature 


GLT 










REL 101 




Introduction to Religious Studies 


GPR 




GL 






REL 104 




Religion, Ritual, and the Arts 


GPR 




GL 






REL 109 




Religion and Contemporary Culture 


GPR 










REL 111 




Non-Western Religion 


GPR 






GN 




REL 201 




The Bible in Western Culture 


GPR 




GL 






REL 202 




Hebrew Scriptures 


GHP 


GPM 








REL 204 




New Testament and the Origins of Christianity 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 






REL 207 




Modern Problems of Belief 


GPR 










REL 209 




Elements of Christian Thought 


GPR 




GL 






REL 210 




Christianity to the Reformation 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 






REL 212 




Christianity from the Reformation to the Present 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 






REL 215 




Judaism 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 






REL 217 




The Synagogue 


GHP 


GPM 




GN 





^ 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



85 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



► 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global 


Global/NW Lab 


REL 218 


Chinese Religion 


GPR 






GN 


REL 220 


Japanese Religion 


GPR 






GN 


REL 221 


Buddhism 


GPR 






GN 


REL 223 


Hinduism 


GPR 






GN 


REL 225 


Islam 


GPR 






GN 


REL 229 


Introduction to African American Religions 


GHP 


GMO 






REL 231 


Religion in America 


GHP 


GMO 






REL 232 


American Religious Thought: A Survey 


GPR 








REL 240 


Modern Jewish Thought 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




REL 248 


Comparative Religious Ethics 


GPR 






GN 


REL 250 


Religious Traditions and Care of Earth 


GPR 






GN 


REL 251 


Topics in Religious Social Ethics 


GPR 








REL 254 


Religion in Traditional Societies 








GN 


REL 258 


Darwin, Evolution, and Human Nature 


GPR 








REL 259 


Philosophy of Religion 


GPR 








REL 327 


American Religious Thought II: The Romantic Tradition 


GPR 








RPM 101 


Leisure and American Lifestyles 


GSB 








RPM316 


Leisure for Older Adults 


GSB 








RUS 101 


Elementary Russian I 








GN 


RUS 102 


Elementary Russian II 








GN 


RUS 201 


Russian Literature in Translation 


GLT 






GN 


RUS 202 


Russian Literature in Translation 








GN 


RUS 203 


Intermediate Russian 




GFL 




GN 


RUS 204 


Intermediate Russian 




GFL 




GN 


RUS 306 


Slavic Life and Letters: Topics 








GN 


RUS 313 


Major Authors in Russian Literature 


GLT 






GN 


RUS 314 


Major Movements in Russian Literature and Culture 


GLT 






GN 


SES 200 


People with Disabilities in American Society 


GSB 








SES 240 


Communication Development in Children 


GSB 








SOC 101 


Introduction to Sociology 


GSB 








SOC 202 


Social Problems in Global Context 


GSB 




GL 




SOC 222 


Sociology of Deviant Behavior 


GSB 








SOC 227 


Race and Ethnic Relations 


GSB 








SOC 300 


Post Soviet Societies 








GN 


SOC 323 


Global Deviance 






GL 




SOC 344 


Global Society 






GL 




SOC 375 


International Field Research 








GN 


SPA 100 


Spanish for Health Care 






GL 




SPA 101 


Beginning Spanish I 






GL 




SPA 101B 


Beginning Business Spanish 






GL 




SPA 102 


Beginning Spanish II 






GL 




SPA 102B 


Beginning Business Spanish 






GL 




SPA 203 


Intermediate Spanish I 




GFL 


GL 




SPA 204 


Intermediate Spanish II 




GFL 


GL 




SPA 222 


Hispanic Masterpieces in English Translation 


GLT 




GL 





86 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



University Requirements 



General Education Course Summary Table 



Course 


Title 


GE Core 


CAR 


Global 


Global/NW Lab 


SPA 233 


Hispanic Cultures and Civilizations 






GL 




SPA 240 


Intermediate Spanish 1 for Business 




GFL 


GL 




SPA 241 


Intermediate Spanish II for Business 




GFL 


GL 




SPA 301 


Advanced Spanish 






GL 




SPA 311 


Spanish Conversation 






GL 




SPA 315 


Intermediate Spanish Composition 






GL 




SPA 321 


Spanish in a Public School Setting 






GL 




SPA 332 


Introduction to Spanish Culture 






GL 




SPA 334 


Introduction to Spanish American Culture 






GL 




SPA 341 


Business Spanish 






GL 




SPA 351 


Approaches to Hispanic Literature 


GLT 




GL 




SPA 402 


Spanish Literature I 


GLT 




GL 




SPA 403 


Spanish Literature II 


GLT 




GL 




SPA 404 


Spanish American Literature I 


GLT 






GN 


SPA 405 


Spanish American Literature II 


GLT 






GN 


SPA 411 


Advanced Spanish Conversation 






GL 




SPA 415 


Advanced Spanish Composition 






GL 




STA 108 


Elementary Introduction to Probability and Statistics 


GMT 








SWK311 


Human Behavior and Social Environment 


GSB 








SWK 522 


Comparative Study of Cross-cultural Social Work Practice 






GL 




THR 100 


Drama Appreciation 


GFA 








THR 130 


Fundamentals of Acting 


GFA 








THR 305 


Development of American Musical Theatre 


GFA 








THR 323 


The Arts as Human Experience 


GFA 








THR 500 


Theatre History I 


GLT 








THR 501 


Theatre History II 


GLT 








THR 502 


Theatre History III 


GFA 








THR 506 


Non-Western Theatre and/or Film 








GN 


WCV 101 


Western Civilization 


GHP 


GPM 


GL 




WCV 102 


Western Civilization 


GHP 


GMO 


GL 




WGS 250 


An Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies 


GSB 








WGS 333 


Women in Non-Western Cultures 


GHP 


GMO 




GN 


WGS 350 


Introduction to Feminist Theories 


GPR 









A 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



87 



6. Academic Units 



The College of Arts and Sciences 

105 Foust Building 

Timothy D. Johnston, Professor and Dean of the College 
Denise N. Baker, Professor and Associate Dean 
Robert C. Hansen, Professor and Associate Dean 
Jacquelyn Wlrite, Interim Associate Dean for Research 
Karen H. Patrick, Assistant Dean 

Through its faculty, courses, and programs, the College 
of Arts and Sciences encourages intellectual inquiry and 
development of the knowledge and skills that enable critical 
examination of traditions and assumptions. A liberal educa- 
tion prepares students for informed and reflective participa- 
tion in society, for sustained cultural and aesthetic enjoyment, 
and for a lifetime of learning. 

Freedom and self-motivation in the context of a rational 
plan of disciplined study are fundamental to a liberal arts 
education. Students are encouraged to seek relationships 
among the various subjects studied and to develop a coher- 
ent intellectual perspective. To aid in this process, the College 
requirements build upon the University's General Education 
requirements. 

The College of Arts and Sciences is composed of the 
departments of Anthropology; Art; Biology; Chemistry and 
Biochemistry; Classical Studies; Communication Studies; 
Computer Science; English; Geography; German and Rus- 
sian; History; Mathematics and Statistics; Media Studies; Phi- 
losophy; Physics and Astronomy; Political Science; Psychol- 
ogy; Religious Studies; Romance Languages; Sociology; and 
Theatre. The College also includes Freshman Seminars, Afri- 
can American Studies, Archaeology, Environmental Studies, 
Humanities (online Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies pro- 
gram), International and Global Studies, and Women's and 
Gender Studies. 

CASA, the College advising center, provides academic 
assistance for first-year and pre-major undergraduate stu- 
dents. 

College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

In addition to the course requirements stated in the Uni- 
versity's General Education Core (GEC) in chapter 5, students 
majoring in the College of Arts and Sciences must also com- 
plete the following: 

Humanities (Literature GLT, Fine Arts GFA, 
Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives GPR) 

Students in the College must distribute the 12 semester 
hours required by GEC in the Humanities as follows: GLT, 
six (6) hours; GFA, three (3) hours; and GPR, three (3) hours. 

Historical Perspectives (GEC: GHP; CAR: GPM and GMO) 

Students must complete a total of six (6) semester hours 
in GHP courses, with one course chosen from the premodern 
(GPM) list and one from the modern (GMO) list. See course 
lists on next page. 



Natural Sciences (GEC: GNS; CAR: GLS and GPS) 

Students must complete a total of 9-10 semester hours 
in GNS courses, with at least one course chosen from the Life 
Science (GLS) list, and at least one course chosen from the 
Physical Science (GPS) list. One of the three must include a 
laboratory. See course lists on next page. 

Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 

Students must complete a total of nine (9) semester hours 
in GSB courses, with courses taken from at least two different 
academic departments. 

Foreign Language (GFL) 

Students are required to demonstrate intermediate-level 
proficiency in a foreign language. The typical sequence of 
UNCG courses for foreign language is 101, 102, 203, and 204. 
The College considers successful completion of the 204 course 
a demonstration of proficiency. Students may place out of one 
or more courses through a placement test. 

Students whose high school courses were taught in a for- 
eign language may document their proficiency with a high 
school transcript. Students who are proficient in a language 
other than those taught at UNCG may submit a letter of certi- 
fication from a professor at any accredited U.S. college or uni- 
versity documenting proficiency. Students with documented 
learning disabilities or demonstrable long-standing difficul- 
ties learning a foreign language can apply for the Modified 
Foreign Language Program through which they may demon- 
strate proficiency. 

Six (6) hours of foreign language course work, with the 
exception of American Sign Language, may be used toward 
the General Education marker requirement of 12 hours of 
Global (GL) or Global Non-Western (GN) courses. See chap- 
ter 5. 

Petitions for exemption from the foreign language 
requirement will be considered only in the most exceptional 
circumstances when an otherwise qualified student has 
submitted evidence that the Modified Foreign Language 
Program in Spanish cannot provide appropriate accom- 
modations for his or her disability or language-learning 
difficulty. In very rare cases, a substitution for the 203 and/ 
or 204 level of a foreign language may be considered. 

The following reasons do not merit an appeal: 

• Change of major from a professional school to the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, or change within the College 
of Arts and Sciences from a B.F.A. to a B.A. degree 

• Concerns about grade point average (GPA) 

• Dislike of the requirement 

• Failure to plan adequately for the graduation time- 
line, including interruptions of the foreign language 
sequence that make future foreign language success 
more difficult 

• Failure to succeed in a single course 

• Misunderstanding of the degree requirements 

• Differences in General Education requirements between 
the College of Arts and Sciences and previously 
attended institutions 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Units 



• Waivers or substitutions offered by previously attended 

institutions 

Please contact College of Arts and Sciences Advising at 
336/334-4361 for further information. 

For information concerning the Modified Foreign Lan- 
guage Program, see www.uncg.edu/rom. 

Writing Intensive Courses (Wl) 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences must com- 
plete a total of four (4) Writing Intensive (WI) courses: 

1. At least one of the four (4) Writing Intensive courses 
must be in the student's primary major and at least one 
must be in the upper division (300 and above). A single 
course may satisfy both the requirement for a course in 
the major and the requirement for a course in the upper- 
division, as long as a total of four Writing Intensives are 
taken. 

2. Transfer students: 

a. Students with 30-59 transfer hours, and return- 
ing students who completed 30-59 semester hours 
of their course work at UNCG prior to 1989, are 
required to take three Writing Intensive courses. 
One of the three must be in the student's primary 
major and at least one must be in the upper division 
(300 and above). A single course may satisfy both 
the requirement for a course in the major and the 
requirement for a course in the upper division, as 
long as a total of three Writing Intensives are taken. 

b. Students with 60-89 transfer hours, and returning 
students who completed 60-89 hours at UNCG 
prior to 1989, are required to take two Writing 
Intensive courses. The two courses may be at any 
level, but at least one must be in the department or 
program of the primary major. 

c. Students with 90 or more transfer hours, or who 
return having completed 90 or more hours at 
UNCG prior to 1989, must take one Writing Inten- 
sive course. The course may be at any level from the 
department or program of the primary major. 

NOTE: Writing Intensive courses may also meet General 
Education Core category, marker, or major requirements. 

Students who obtain a score of 4 or higher on the English 
Advanced Placement Literature and Composition examina- 
tion are exempted from one of the Writing Intensive courses. 
Contact the Department of English for further information. 

Summary of CAR 

Humanities 

Twelve semester hours required, distributed as follows: 
Literature (GLT) 6 AP 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 AP 

Philosophical/Religious/Ethical (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives 6 Ar 

(GEC: GHP + CAR: GPM and GMO) 

Six (6) semester hours required, including one course 
from each category: 



Premodern (GPM) (3 s.h.) 

CCI 201 Introduction to Greek Civilization 
CCI 202 Introduction to Roman Civilization 
CCI 21 1 Introduction to Greek Archaeology 
CCI 212 Introduction to Roman Archaeology 
CCI 240 Ancient Warfare 

FMS 150 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Pre- 
modern 
FMS 151 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 

Premodern — Global Perspectives 
FMS 152 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 

Premodern — Global Non-Western Perspectives 
HIS 203 History of Africa to 1 870 
HIS 206 Topics in Premodern World History I 
HIS 207 Topics in Premodern World History II 
HIS 215 The Civilizations of Asia 
HIS 221 Medieval Legacy 
HIS 220 The Ancient World 
HIS 222 Europe 1400-1789 
HIS 251 The History of Western Science: A Survey 
HIS 369 History of Spain 
HIS 373 English History to 1660 

HSS 201 Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Premodern 
MUS 331 History of Western Music I 
PHI 251 History of Ancient Philosophy 
RCO 108 Residential College Core Course: The American 

Experience 
RCO 240-244 Residential College Seminars in Historical 

Perspectives of Western Culture — Premodern 
REL 202 Hebrew Scriptures 

REL 204 New Testament and the Origins of Christianity 
REL 210 Christianity to the Reformation 
REL 21 5 Judaism 
REL 21 7 The Synagogue 
WCV101 Western Civilization 
Modern (GMO) (3 s.h.) 

AFS 201 Introduction to African American Studies 

CRS 372 Survey of Historic Costume 

FMS 160 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 

FMS 161 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 

Modern — Global Perspectives 
FMS 162 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 

Modern — Global Non-Western Perspectives 
HIS 204 History of Africa since 1870 
HIS 208 Topics in Modern World History I 
HIS 209 Topics in Modern World History II 
HIS 21 1 The United States: A General Survey to 1865 
HIS 212 The United States: A General Survey since 1865 
HIS 216 The Civilizations of Asia 
HIS 217 The World in the Twentieth Century: 1900-1945 
HIS 218 The World in the Twentieth Century: since 1945 
HIS 223 Modern Europe 
HIS 239 Latin America: Colonial Period 
HIS 240 Latin America: National Period 
HIS 252 The History of Western Science: A Survey 
HIS 301 Race and Slavery 
HIS 302 Race and Segregation 
HIS 31 1 Darwin and the Theory of Evolution 
HIS 327 American Cultural History 
HIS 335 The American Colonial Period, 1607-1763 
HIS 336 The Age of the Democratic Revolution 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



8 L > 



Academic Units 



HIS 345 The Unfit: Race Cleansing in the United States 
HIS 360 The Structure of Scientific Change: Topics in the 

History of Science 
HIS 371 Europe since World War I 
HIS 374 British History 1688-Present 
HIS 381 The Near and Middle East 
HSS 202 Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 
MUS 434 American Music 
PHI 252 History of Modern Philosophy 
RCO 109, 208-209 Residential College Core Course: The 

American Experience 
RCO 245-249 Residential College Seminars in Historical 

Perspectives of Western Culture — Modern 
REL 212 Christianity from the Reformation to the Present 
REL 229 Introduction to African American Religions 
REL 231 Religion in America 
REL 240 Modern Jewish Thought 
WCV 102 Western Civilization 
WGS333 Gendered Worlds 

Natural Science 9-10 Ar 

(GEC: GNS + CAR: GPS and GLS) 

Nine (9) to ten semester hours required including one lab- 
oratory course, and at least one course from each category: 
Physical Science (GPS) (3-7 s.h.) 

AST 203 Conceptual Astronomy 

AST 209 Astronomy: The Solar System 

AST 235 Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies 

CHE 101 Introductory Chemistry (formerly 106) 

CHE 103 General Descriptive Chemistry I 

CHE 104 General Descriptive Chemistry II 

CHE 110 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory 

CHE 1 1 1 General Chemistry I 

CHE 112 General Chemistry I Laboratory 

CHE 114 General Chemistry II 

CHE 115 General Chemistry II Laboratory 

FMS 183 Freshman Seminar in Physical Science 

FMS 183L Freshman Seminar in Physical Science Laboratory 

GEO 103 Introduction to Earth Science 

GEO 106 Geosystems Science 

GEO 106L Geosystems Science Laboratory 

GEO 1 1 1 Physical Geology 

GEO 1 1 1 L Physical Geology Laboratory 

GEO 121 Introduction to Geographic Information Science 

GEO 31 1 Weather and Climate 

GE0 311L Climatology Laboratory 

GEO 314 Physical Geography: Landscape Processes 

GEO 31 4L Physical Geography Laboratory 

HSS 203 Seminar in the Physical Sciences 

PHY 205 Conceptual Physics 

PHY 205L Conceptual Physics Laboratory 

PHY 21 1 General Physics I 

PHY 21 1 A General Physics I 

PHY 212 General Physics II 

PHY 21 2A General Physics II 

PHY 291 General Physics I with Calculus 

PHY 292 General Physics II with Calculus 

RCO 255-259 Residential College Seminars in Natural Science* 
Life Science (GLS) (3-7 s.h.) 

ATY 253 Introduction to Physical Anthropology 

BIO 105 Major Concepts of Biology 



BIO 105L Major Concepts of Bio Laboratory 

BIO 1 1 1 Principles of Biology I 

BIO 112 Principles of Biology II 

FMS 184 Freshman Seminar in Life Science 

FMS 184L Freshman Seminar in Life Science Laboratory 

HSS 204 Seminar in the Life Sciences 

NTR213 Introductory Nutrition 

PSY 230 Biological Psychology 

RCO 250-254 Residential College Seminars in Natural Science* 
*RCO 250-259 may carry either GPS or GLS credit; see advisor or 
semester Schedule of Courses. 

Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 9 AP 

Nine (9) semester hours required, with courses from at 
least two different academic departments 

Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 or proficiency AP 

Intermediate-level proficiency in one language required. 
Proficiency may be demonstrated by placement test or by 
completing course work through course number 204 in: 

American Sign Language, French, Chinese, German*, 
Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish. 
"'Indicates that AP credit is available in these categories; see chap- 
ter 2 for AP course information. 

*In German, proficiency may also he demonstrated by completing 
GER3U. 

Non-native speakers of English are exempted from the 
College foreign language requirement. 

Writing Intensive (WI) 12 

Students must complete a total of four WI courses, with 
at least one at the 200 level or below, at least one at the 300 
level or above, and one in the major. See semester Schedule of 
Courses for complete listing of Writing Intensive courses. 

All students in the College must fulfill the foregoing Col- 
lege Additional Requirements (CAR). A course in the major 
may be used to satisfy College requirements. 

Requirements for each of the degrees offered by the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences are included in the descriptions 
of majors, concentrations, and minors under the respective 
departments. 

General Education/CAR Credit through Study 
Abroad 

In addition to the previously listed General Educa- 
tion courses, students may receive General Education Core 
and Marker Credit and College Additional Credit (CAR) 
for courses taken in three overseas programs offered by the 
University's International Programs Center. For information 
about these courses, contact the International Programs Cen- 
ter, 127 Mclver Street, UNCG, 336/334-5404. 
Fall Semester in Estonia 

Political System and Administration (GSB) 

Estonian History (GHP) 

Estonian Literature in Translation (GLT-GN) 

Estonian Culture (GFA) 

Ecology and Nature in Estonia (GNS) 

Economy (GSB) 



90 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Units 



Fall Semester in Finland 

Cultures and Societies of Scandinavia (GSB) 
Indigenous Cultures of the Polar Region (GN) 
Arts of Scandinavia (GFA) 

Finnish and Scandinavian Literature in Translation (GLT-GN) 
Nordic Nature and Environment (GNS) 
Spring Semester in Poland 
Arts in Contemporary Poland (GFA) 
Culture and Society in Contemporary Poland (GSB) 
Evolution of Political Systems in Eastern Europe (GSB) 
History of Poland (GHP) 
Transition of Central European Countries to Market Economies 

(GSB) 
Polish Literature in Translation (GLT-GN) 

Major Requirements 

Major requirements are described for each program 
listed. A course cross-listed in the major department must be 
taken within the major and counts toward the total semester 
hours in the major. 

Minor Requirements 

Most departments and interdepartmental programs of 
the College offer a minor program which may be taken in 
conjunction with a major. A minor usually requires 15 to 21 
semester hours in a department. No more than 8 of the hours 
in department courses may be taken at the 100 level and at 
least 9 hours must be taken in residence at UNCG. 

Second Majors 

A student may take a second major in conjunction with 
the first major. This program requires a minimum of 27 
semester hours in each of two approved majors. All require- 
ments of each major must be met; hours from the second 
major can be applied toward General Education require- 
ments. A student with a first major outside the College who 
chooses a second major in one of the College departments is 
required to complete all of the departmental requirements for 
the second major but need not satisfy the Additional College 
General Education requirements (CAR). In the case of trans- 
fer students, at least 15 hours in each major must be taken at 
UNCG. 

Career Skills Packages for Majors in the 
College of Arts and Sciences 

Career Skills Packages are designed to be paired with 
a major in the College of Arts and Sciences, and thus are 
designed for students seeking their baccalaureate degrees. 
Their purposes are to expand opportunities for majors in the 
liberal arts and sciences to pursue course work in professional 
areas, thereby giving these students advantages in employ- 
ment following graduation and a higher level of confidence in 
pursuing a major in the College from the outset. 

Career Skills Packages consist of approximately 12-18 
hour interdisciplinary curricular packages. In addition, 
an internship, preferably in an area related to the student's 
major, will be completed in the senior year. Most courses 
taken as part of the Career Skills Packages are above the 100 
level. Students working on "skills packages" will be assigned 



a certificate advisor as well as a major advisor. Completion of 
a skills package in an approved area will be recorded on the 
student's official transcript. 

The College currently offers Career Skills Packages in 
Business and Computer Programming. 

Students interested in learning more about Career Skills 
Packages are asked to contact the College of Arts and Sciences 
Advising Center (CASA) at 336/334-4361. 

Career Skills Package in Computer Programming 
Required: 1 3-1 6 semester hours 
AOSCode: U910 

This Career Skills Package prepares students for entry- 
level positions in computer programming. It requires 13-16 
semester hours of courses and completion of an internship. If 
CSC 261 and MAT 353 are also taken, the program will pre- 
pare students to enter the M.S. in Computer Science program. 
This program is designed for current undergraduate students 
majoring in fields other than computer science. The program 
may be completed through day or evening classes. 

Requirements 

• MAT 150 (meets the GMT requirement) and MAT 253 

• Students with no previous programming experience: 
CSC 130, 230 or 231, and 330 

• Students with experience in programming equivalent 
to a one-semester course in a high-level programming 
language: CSC 231 and 330 

• One of CSC 261, 339 or 340 

• Completion of an internship, with emphasis on computer 
programming, to be selected from: ATY 499, BIO 497, 
CHE 490, CCI 450, CST 412, ENG 401 or 402, ENV 399, 
GEO 495, MST 494, PSC 399, SOC 499. Another internship 
can be substituted with permission of advisor. Depart- 
ment requirements for internships must also be met. 

Career Skills Package in Business 
Required: 15 semester hours 
AOSCode: U911 

This Career Skills Package prepares students majoring in 
the College of Arts and Sciences with a background in fun- 
damentals of accounting or economics as well as a basic set 
of business skills in the areas of communication, technology, 
and management. 

Requirements 

• One of ACC 201, ECO 101, or ECO 201 

• ISM 110 or CSC 130 

• CST 341 or MGT 309 

• One of MGT 200, 312, 330, 354/SOC 354 

• One additional 3-hour course in ECO, ACC, or MGT 
chosen in consultation with advisor 

• Completion of an internship to be selected from: ATY 
499, BIO 497, CHE 490, CCI 450, CST 412, ENG 401 or 
402, ENV 399, GEO 495, MST 494, PSC 399, SOC 499. 
Another internship can be substituted with permission 
of advisor. Department requirements for internships 
must also be met. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



91 



Academic Units 



Professional Certificates in the College of Arts 
and Sciences 

Professional certificates in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences are designed for students who have already earned 
their baccalaureate degrees but who wish to expand their 
employment opportunities or acquire additional professional 
expertise. Professional certificates consist of approximately a 
12-18 hour package of interdisciplinary course work that con- 
sists chiefly of introductory, foundational courses combined 
with some upper division courses. 

The College currently offers a Professional Certificate in 
Computer Programming (see Computer Science). For other 
post-baccalaureate certificates, see The Graduate School Bulletin. 

Special Academic Programs in CAS 



African American Studies 
Archaeology 
Freshman Seminars 
Environmental Studies 
Humanities 



International and Global 

Studies 
Medical Technology 
Preprofessional Programs 
Women's and Gender 

Studies 



Student-Designed Interdisciplinary Major (SDIM) 

The Student-Designed Interdisciplinary Major (SDIM) is 
an option available to students whose academic goals are not 
adequately served by any major, or combination of majors, 
second majors, and minors, available in the College of Arts 
and Sciences or in one of the professional schools. 

Students selecting the SDIM option must satisfy all Col- 
lege Additional Requirements and meet all University aca- 
demic regulations. The option may not be used as a way of 
circumventing the requirements of an established major, and 
SDIM Plans (see below) that constitute only minor changes to 
an existing major will not be approved. An SDIM Plan must 
represent a coherent academic program of study, not simply a 
collection of courses assembled to enable a student to obtain 
a degree. 



The procedure for requesting approval of an SDIM is as 
follows: 

1. A faculty member in the College must agree to serve as 
the student's advisor, to take responsibility for helping 
the student design a plan of study and for monitoring the 
student's progress. A student who wishes to pursue an 
SDIM, but is unsure which faculty to ask to serve as his 
or her advisor, should consult initially with the Associate 
Dean of the College, Room 100, Foust Building. 

2. The student and the advisor devise a Plan of Study for 
the major. The Plan consists of: 

(1) A brief paragraph describing the aims and inten- 
tions of the proposed major, and explaining why 
no existing major or combination of majors, second 
majors, or minors can be used to pursue those aims; 

(2) A list of courses (minimum of 27 credits) that will 
constitute the major; 

(3) Either a list of courses or a narrative paragraph 
explaining how the student will satisfy (or has 
satisfied) the College's Liberal Education, foreign 
language, and writing-intensive requirements. 
The student's advisor should ensure that courses 
included in the Plan are in fact offered with reason- 
able frequency; not all courses listed in the Bulletin 
will be available with sufficient frequency to ensure 
timely graduation. 

3. The Plan is initially submitted to the Associate Dean 
of the College for review. The Associate Dean will 
ensure that the Plan meets all the requirements noted 
above and will send copies of the approved Plan to the 
student, the major advisor, and the Office of Student 
Academic Services. 

4. A student planning to graduate with an SDIM should 
submit the Plan of Study for review as soon as possible, 
but in any case prior to registering for the last 45 semes- 
ter hours needed for graduation. 

5. Any changes to the Plan after it has been submitted 
must be approved by the Associate Dean, who will 
forward the modified Plan to the Office of Student Aca- 
demic Services. Generally, modifications will only be 
approved because some of the approved courses have 
become unavailable or because a new course appears to 
be better suited to the Plan than one that was originally 
included. 



The College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Areas of Study 

Department Degree Major Hours Reg Area of Study — AOS Code 



Anthropology 



B.A. Anthropology 



122 ♦ Anthropology— U 101 

♦ Anthropology— U 102 (Soc. Stu. H.S. Teaching) 



Art 



B.A. Art 



B.F.A. 



Art 



122 ♦ Art History/Museum Studies— U 104 

♦ Studio Art— U 105 

128 ♦ Design— U1 11 

♦ Painting— U1 13 

♦ Sculpture— U1 15 

♦ Art Education I— U107 (K-1 2 Teaching) 

♦ Art Education II— U109 (K-1 2 Teaching) 



92 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Units 



The College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Areas of Study 
Department Degree Major Hours Reg 



Area of Study— AOS Code 



Biology 



B.A. Biology 



B.S. Biology 



122 ♦ Biology— U1 17 

♦ Biology— U1 19 (High School Teaching) 

♦ Environmental Biology — U122 

122 ♦ Biology— U1 16 

♦ Biology— U21 8 (High School Teaching) 

♦ Biotechnology — U214 

♦ Environmental Biology — U118 

♦ Human Biology— U863 



Chemistry & Biochemistry B.A. Chemistry 



B.S. Chemistry 



B.S. Biochemistry 



122 ♦ Chemistry— U1 21 

♦ Chemistry — U125 (High School Teaching) 

122 ♦ Biochemistry— U 124 

♦ Chemistry— U1 23 

♦ Chemistry— U1 26 (High School Teaching) 

♦ Chemistry Research — U168 

19 • Chemistry (minor)— U 121 
122 ♦ Biochemistry— U860 



Classical Studies 



B.A. Classical Studies 



122 ♦ Classical Archaeology— U352 

♦ Classical Civilization — U354 

♦ Classical Language & Literature— U357 

♦ Latin— U1 29 (High School Teaching) 

18 * Classical Studies (second academic 
concentration) — U1 30 





— 




15 


• Classical Studies (minor) — U350 


Communication Studies 


B.A. 


Communication Studies 


122 


♦ Communication Studies — U137 


Computer Science 


B.S. 


Computer Science 


122 
15 


♦ Bioinformatics— U838 

♦ Computer Science — U180 

♦ Computer Science (minor) — U180 


English 


B.A. 


English 


122 
18 


♦ English— U1 55 

♦ English — U157 (High School Teaching) 

♦ English (minor) — U155 



Geography 



B.A. 



Geography 



122 ♦ Earth Science/Environmental Studies — U167 

♦ Geographic Information Science — U164 

♦ Geography— U 163 

♦ Geography— U 169 (Soc. Stu. H.S. Teaching) 

♦ Urban Planning— U 165 



German & Russian 



B.A. 



German 



Russian 



122 ♦ German— U 171 

• German (minor) — U171 
15 • Russian (minor) — U160 



History 



B.A. 



History 



122 ♦ History— U 175 

♦ History— U1 77 (Soc. Stu. H.S. Teaching) 

15 * History (minor) — U175 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



93 



Academic Units 



The College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Areas of Study 
Department Degree Major Hours Reg 



Area of Study— AOS Code 



Mathematics and Statistics B.A. Mathematics 



B.S. Mathematics 



122 ♦ Mathematics— U 179 

♦ Mathematics — U183 (High School Teaching) 

122 ♦ Applied Mathematics— U852 

♦ Applied Mathematics— U850 (H.S. Teaching) 

♦ Computer Science — U182 

♦ Computer Science — U854 (H.S. Teaching) 

♦ Interdisciplinary — U178 

♦ Pure Mathematics— U853 

♦ Pure Mathematics — U851 (H.S. Teaching) 

♦ Statistics— U 184 

♦ Statistics — U855 (High School Teaching) 

15 • Mathematics (minor) — U179 

15 » Statistics (minor)— U 192 



Media Studies 



B.A. Media Studies 



122 ♦ Film & TV Studies— U856 

♦ Film & Video Production— U857 

♦ News & Documentary — U858 

♦ Media Management — U835 

♦ Media Writing— U847 

18 • Film & TV Studies (minor)— U859 

18 » Radio (minor)— U848 



Philosophy 



B.A. Philosophy 



122 ♦ Philosophy— U1 89 

♦ Philosophy/Pre-law— U190 

18 • Philosophy (minor)— U1 89 

18 • Philosophical Ethics (minor) — U194 



Physics & Astronomy 



B.A. Physics 



B.S. Physics 



122 ♦ Physics— U 191 

♦ Physics — U195 (High School Teaching) 

122 ♦ Physics— U 193 

♦ Physics— U1 96 (High School Teaching) 

15 * Physics (minor) — U191 



Political Science 



B.A. Political Science 



122 ♦ Political Science— U1 97 

♦ Prelaw— U 198 

♦ Political Science— U1 99 (Soc. Stu. H.S. Teach- 
ing) 





— 




15 


• Political Science (minor) — U197 


Psychology 


B.A. 


Psychology 


122 
18-19 


♦ Psychology— U2 15 

♦ Psychology— U21 7 (Soc. Stu. H.S. Teaching) 

♦ Psychology (minor) — U215 


Religious Studies 


B.A. 


Religious Studies 


122 


♦ Religious Studies— U21 9 



Romance Languages 



B.A. 



French 



B.A. Spanish 



122 


♦ 




♦ 


15-21 


• 


122 


♦ 




♦ 


15-21 


• 


122 


♦ 




♦ 




♦ 




♦ 



French— U 159 

French— U1 61 (K-1 2 Teaching) 

French (minor) — U159 

Spanish— U227 

Spanish— U229 (K-1 2 Teaching) 

Spanish (minor)— U227 



Sociology 



B.A. Sociology 



Sociology— U221 

Sociology— U223 (Soc. Stu. H.S. Teaching) 

Criminology— U222 

Social Problems in a Global Society — U224 



44 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Units 



The College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Areas of Study 

Department Degree Major Hours Reg Area of Study — AOS Code 



Theatre 



B.A. 



B.F.A. 



Drama 



Drama 



122 

18 
18 

124 
124 
124 
128 



• Drama— U880 

• Drama (minor) — U880 

• Technical Theatre (minor)- 



-U884 



♦ Acting— U881 

♦ Design & Technical Theatre— U882 

♦ Technical Production — U885 

♦ Theatre Education— U883 (K-1 2 Teaching) 



Special Degree Programs (sponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences) 

Department Degree Major Hours Reg Area of Study — AOS Code 



Biology 


B.S. 


Bio/4+1 Med Tech 


124 


♦ Biology/Medical Tech— U 186 


Chemistry & Biochemistry 


B.S. 
B.S. 


Biochem/4+1 Med Tech 
Chem/4+1 Med Tech 


124 
124 


♦ Biochemistry/Medical Tech — U861 

♦ Chemistry/Medical Tech— U 188 


Interdepartmental Programs (sponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences) 
Interdepartmental Program Degree Major Hours Reg Area of Study — AOS Code 


African American Studies 


B.A. 


African American Studies 


122 


♦ African American Studies — U803 


Archaeology 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122 


♦ Archaeology— U808 


Bachelor of Arts in 
Liberal Studies 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122 


♦ Humanities— U820 


Environmental Studies 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 122/18 
Liberal Studies 


♦ Environmental Studies 
(major and minor) — U825 



International & Global Studies 



B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122/18 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122/18 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122/18 
18 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122/18 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122/18 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122/18 


B.A. 


Special Programs in 
Liberal Studies 


122/18 



International & Global Studies, 
with the following options: 

♦ International & Global Affairs & 
Development— U821 (minor U814) 

♦ International & Global 

Arts & Belief Systems— U822 (minor U814) 

♦ International & Global 

Human Rights— U829 (minor U833) 

Regional Studies with emphases in: 

♦ African Studies (minor) — U818 

♦ Asian Studies— U824 (minor U81 9) 

♦ European Studies— U81 2 (minor U826) 

♦ Latin American & Caribbean Studies — U823 
(minor U828) 

♦ Russian Studies— U802 (minor U827) 



Medical Technology 



B.S.M.T Medical Technology 



124 ♦ Medical Technology— U 187 



Women's & Gender Studies B.A. 



Women's & Gender 
Studies 



122 



♦ Women's & Gender Studies— U871 



Special Certificate Programs (sponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences) 

Dept Degree Certificate ProgramHours Reg Area of Study — AOS Code 



Computer Science 



Career Skills Package 13-16 ♦ Computer Programming — U910 



Interdepartmental 



Career Skills Package 



15 



♦ Business— U91 1 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



95 



Academic Units 



Joseph M. Bryan School of 
Business and Economics 

401 Bryan Building 
www.uncg.edu/bae 

James K. Weeks, Professor and Dean of the School 
Donald L. McCrickard, Associate Professor 

and Senior Associate Dean 
Joyendu Bhaditry, Professor and Associate Dean 
Pamela R. Cash, Assistant Dean 

Mission Statement 

The Bryan School's mission is to: 

• offer educational programs that prepare students to perform 
successfully as business professionals in a global economy, 

• conduct and disseminate scholarly research that enhances the 
performance of managed organizations and informs public 
policy decisions, 

• provide professional services and outreach, and thereby, 

• support the region 's, state's, and nation 's economic develop- 
ment. 

The Bryan School of Business and Economics is organized 
into four academic departments, each of which offers a pro- 
gram leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. The Depart- 
ment of Economics also offers a liberal-arts-oriented program 
leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Student Learning Goals 

The primary learning goal for the undergraduate pro- 
gram in the Bryan School is to prepare students to perform 
successfully as business professionals in a global economy. 
The following learning objectives have been endorsed by the 
faculty to guide the development, evaluation, and continuous 
improvement of the undergraduate degree programs, and to 
assure that our graduates are prepared to meet the challenges 
of the future. These objectives are common to all B.S. majors 
and concentrations, and are supplemented by additional 
learning objectives that are relevant to the specific major or 
concentration. 

• Students will be skilled in critical thinking and decision- 
making, as supported by the appropriate use of analyti- 
cal and quantitative techniques. 

• Students can recognize and assess the ethical and social 
dimensions of management activities and evaluate their 
impact on management decisions. 

• Students can communicate clearly and correctly, and can 
demonstrate collaborative and leadership skills. 

• Students understand the core organizational functions 
and activities and how they interrelate to accomplish an 
organization's major goals through effective processes. 

• Students can evaluate the role global markets have on 
management decisions and formulate appropriate strat- 
egies to improve performance in the world economy. 



Departments 

Accounting and Finance 

Business Administration 

Economics 

Information Systems and Operations Management 

The School's Office of Undergraduate Student Services 

provides academic advising which supplements and comple- 
ments faculty advising. The Director, with a professional staff, 
coordinates orientation and registration for the School, and 
administers admission and retention of majors in the School. 

The Office houses the Bryan School location of the Uni- 
versity's Career Services Center, which is dedicated to work- 
ing with business majors on career development and place- 
ment needs, and internship experiences. Additionally, the 
Office coordinates the advising and registration for business 
majors interested in study abroad. 

The School supports two research centers and one execu- 
tive education office. The McDowell Research Center for 
Global IT Management supports and stimulates the appli- 
cation of information technology in organizations worldwide 
with an emphasis on the Piedmont Triad region, North Caro- 
lina, and the United States, and contributes to the IT-related 
industry clusters in the Triad region, thereby aiding in the eco- 
nomic development and business environment of the affected 
firms. The Center for Business and Economic Research con- 
ducts sponsored research of regional, national, and interna- 
tional interest. The Office of Executive Education Programs 
designs and provides the Program for Management Develop- 
ment and a variety of other high value executive and profes- 
sional development programs and custom services designed 
to meet the specific needs of clients. 

Accreditation 

Professional business and accounting programs offered 
by the Bryan School of Business and Economics are accredited 
by AACSB International, The Association to Advance Colle- 
giate Schools of Business. 

Scope 

Programs within the Bryan School of Business and Eco- 
nomics prepare students for careers in business and other 
managed organizations, teaching, and government, or for 
graduate study. These programs combine the essentials of a 
professional education and the breadth of general education. 

The essential components of a professional education in 
business and economics (Bachelor of Science degrees, exclud- 
ing the B.S. in Economics) include common courses for 
breadth and opportunities for advanced work for depth in the 
various business disciplines. The common courses required 
for Bachelor of Science majors within the Bryan School of 
Business and Economics include ACC 201 or 218, 202; ECO 
201, 202, 250, 300; FIN 315; ISM 110, 280; MGT 301, 309, 312, 
330, 491; MKT 320; and SCM 302. 

Noncredit courses, workshops, and special lectures and 
seminars by distinguished persons of national prominence 
promote continuing education for a diverse public. 

Collaboration with North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University (located in Greensboro) permits 
UNCG students to take courses not offered on the home cam- 
pus—for example, Agricultural Economics or Agribusiness. 



96 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Units 



Enrollment in Bryan School Courses 

Enrollment in Bryan School courses requires a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 2.0 on UNCG course work, regardless of 
the student's major or minor. This includes all courses offered 
under the following prefixes: ACQ BUS, ECO, ENT, FIN, 
ISM, MKT, MGT, and SCM. Courses numbered 300 and above 
may have additional enrollment restrictions that are outlined 
in the course description for each course. 

Requirements for Majoring or Minoring in Bryan 
School Programs 

Students pursuing a major or minor in the Bryan School 
of Business and Economics must have a grade point aver- 
age no less than a 2.0 on UNCG course work. Students in the 
International Business Studies major must have at least a 2.50 
on UNCG course work. Requests to major in one of the Bryan 
School's programs can be made in the Office of Undergraduate 
Student Services, 232 Bryan Building. After being accepted as 
majors in the Bryan School, students must then work toward 
admission to a specific program of study. 

Criteria for Admission to Programs of Study in the 
Bryan School of Business and Economics 

The following are minimum requirements for programs 
of study in the Bryan School. Individual programs may have 
additional requirements. 

Pre-Admission Courses 

B.S. programs (except Economics B.S.): 

ACC 201 or 218, 202; CST 105; ECO 201, 202, 250; ENG 
101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, 102 or other approved ENG 
course; ISM 110, 280; and MAT 120 or 191 

Economics B.S. program: 

ACC 201 or 218, 202; CST 105; ECO 101 or 201, 202, 250; 
ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, ENG 102 or other 
approved ENG course; ISM 110; and MAT 120 or 191 

Economics B.A. program: 

ECO 201, 202, 250; ISM 110; and MAT 120 or 191 
Business Minor program: 

ACC 201, 202, or 218, ECO 101 or 201, and ISM 110 
Students should plan to complete the pre-admission 
courses by the end of the sophomore year, or as soon as pos- 
sible thereafter. 

Application for Admission 

Students should apply for admission to the School and 
to a major during the semester in which they are completing 
pre-admission courses. Those completing the courses during 
a fall semester should apply by October 1. Those completing 
the courses during a spring semester or during the summer, 
should apply by March 1. Applications are available in the 
Undergraduate Student Services Office, 232 Bryan Building. 
Departments may require additional steps in the admission 
to major process. 

Admission to a program of study may be denied in cases where 
additional enrollments would threaten the academic quality of 
classes or programs. 



Criteria for Continuing in the Bryan School of 
Business and Economics 

Students who have been admitted to the Bryan School 
of Business and Economics must be in good academic stand- 
ing at UNCG, must maintain at least the GPA required for 
program admission, and must meet the continuation require- 
ments of their programs of study. 

Foreign Language Requirements 

Foreign language through the first level of intermedi- 
ate proficiency (through the 203 level) is required for all B.S. 
majors, with the exception of the B.S. degree in Economics. 
The typical sequence of UNCG courses for foreign language 
is 101, 102, and 203. Students may be exempted from the 
beginning levels through a placement test. Students study- 
ing abroad may fulfill the foreign language requirement by 
taking any foreign language course in the host-country lan- 
guage, at any level. 

International Business Studies majors are required 
to take additional foreign language courses and should 
work closely with their advisor in selecting the appropriate 
sequence. 

Non-native speakers of English are exempted from this 
requirement. 

Transfers 

Since most of the courses in the major are taken during 
the junior and senior years, transfer students often complete 
their programs without extending their total stay beyond the 
usual four years. As a general guide, courses taught mainly 
to freshmen and sophomores here will usually, but not 
always, be accepted in transfer from accredited two-year col- 
leges. Courses numbered 300 and above generally will not be 
accepted in transfer credit from two-year institutions. In order 
to allow timely completion of the pre-admission courses, 
transfer students are encouraged to complete MAT 120 or 191 
(Calculus) prior to transferring. 

Second Baccalaureate Degrees 

Students pursuing a second bachelor's degree must meet 
all requirements within the Bryan School. A minimum of 50% 
of the Bryan School and departmental requirements must be 
completed at UNCG. The Bryan School cannot, at this time, 
accommodate persons who seek only to complete a series of 
courses in one field (such as Accounting or Information Sys- 
tems). 

Suggested Academic Workload Guidelines 

The faculty of the Bryan School of Business and Econom- 
ics recognizes that many Bryan School students hold jobs to 
support college expenses. The faculty wishes to emphasize 
that academic excellence and scholastic achievement usually 
require a significant investment of time in study, research, and 
out-of-class projects. To provide guidance to students in plan- 
ning their academic and work schedules, the faculty of the 
Bryan School have endorsed the following recommendations: 
1. In general, students should plan to devote between 
2-3 semester hours outside of class for each hour 
in class. Thus, students with a 15-hour course load 
should schedule between 30-45 hours weekly for 
completing outside-of-class reading, study, and 
homework assignments. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



47 



Academic Units 



2. Students who are employed more than 5-10 hours 
each week should consider reducing their course loads 
(semester hours), depending upon their study habits, 
learning abilities, and course work requirements. 

3. Students should take into consideration that many 
business courses require group work and plan 
accordingly. 

Scholarships and Fellowships 

Procedures and requirements for applying for under- 
graduate scholarships are described in chapter 3, Expenses, 
Payments, Refunds, and Financial Aid. 

Business Minor 

Required: minimum of 21 semester hours 

AOSCode: U398 

The Business Minor, consisting of 21 semester hours, is 
available for majors outside the Bryan School of Business and 
Economics who are in good standing in the University. The 
minor complements a variety of professional and arts and sci- 
ences fields. To earn a Business Minor, a student must meet 
the following requirements in the order listed: 

1. Complete ACC 201, 202, or 218, ECO 101 or 201, 
and ISM 110 with a GPA of 2.0 or better. 



2. Apply for admission to the minor program in the 
Bryan School Student Services Office, Room 232, 
Bryan Building. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 
is required. 

3. Consult with an advisor in the Undergraduate 
Student Services Office to select 12 s.h. of electives. 

A cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better must be achieved in the 
21 hours applied toward the minor. 

Admission to the minor may be denied in cases where additional 
enrollments would threaten the academic quality of classes or 
programs. 

Honors Programs 

The Bryan School supports and encourages students 
to participate in the Honors Programs administered by the 
Lloyd International Honors College. 

Additional Information 

Additional information regarding academic planning, 
course sequencing, and course requirements can be found at 
www.uncg.edu/bae. 



Joseph M. Bryan School 
Department 



of Business and Economics Undergraduate Areas of Study 
Degree Major Hours Reg Area of Study — AOS Code 



Accounting & Finance 



B.S. 



B.S. 



Accounting 


122 


♦ Accounting — U301 




15 


• Accounting (minor) — U719 


Finance 


122 


♦ Finance— U360 



Business Administration 



B.S. Business Administration 122 



B.S. International Business 122 

Studies 

B.S. Marketing 122 



♦ Human Resources — U326 

♦ Entrepreneurship/Small Business — U337 

♦ Business Studies — U331 

♦ International Business Studies — U830 



♦ Marketing— U327 



Economics 



B.A. 
B.S. 



Economics 



Economics 



122 ♦ Economics— U305 

♦ Economics — U309 (Social Studies Licensure) 

122 ♦ Economics— U71 7 

♦ Financial Economics — U329 

♦ Economics — U31 1 (Social Studies Licensure) 

18 • Economics (minor) — U305 



Entrepreneurship 




15 


• Entrepreneurship (minor) — U832 


Information Systems B.S. 
& Operations Management 


Information Systems 
& Operations Mgt 


122 

15 


♦ Information Systems — U313 

♦ Supply Chain Management — U339 

♦ Information Technology (minor) — U31 8 


Interdepartmental — 


Business 


21 


• Business (minor) — U398 



9K 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Units 



School of Education 

329 Curry Building 

Dale H. Schunk, Professor and Dean of School 

Betty Epanchin, Professor and Associate Dean for Teacher Education 

Ada Vallecorsa, Professor and Associate Dean for Operations 

The School of Education comprises six departments and 
four centers. 

Departments (Department Code) 

Counseling and Educational Development (CED) 

Educational Leadership & Cultural Foundations (ELC) 

Educational Research Methodology (ERM) 

Library and Information Studies (LIS) 

Specialized Education Services (SES) 

Teacher Education and Higher Education (HED) 

Centers 

Center for Educational Research and Evaluation 
Center for Educational Studies and Development 
Center for School Accountability, Staff Development, 

and Teacher Quality 
Collegium for the Advancement of Schools, Schooling, 

and Education 

All departments are engaged in graduate programs 
leading to master's, specialist's, and/or doctoral degrees. The 
Department of Teacher Education and Higher Education and 
the Department of Specialized Education Services offer under- 
graduate degrees as well; their Bachelor of Science programs 
prepare students for the Standard Professional I License in 



North Carolina. Undergraduate majors are available in Ele- 
mentary and Middle Grades Education, Professions in Deaf- 
ness, and Special Education. 

The School of Education also supports programs in 
teacher education conducted under the auspices of other 
schools (Music; Health and Human Performance; Human 
Environmental Sciences) and departments within the College 
of Arts and Sciences by responding to course requirements 
in the areas of social, philosophical, and psychological foun- 
dations, methodology, and curriculum and student teaching. 
Recent emphases in competency-based curricula and individ- 
ualized programming contribute to new designs of teacher 
education programs. 

All licensure programs for school personnel are approved 
by the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction 
and accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher 
Education. 

The School of Education continues to seek realization of 
its goals as a professional school to create and disseminate 
new knowledge in professional education, to engage in field 
services and apply research findings, to prepare practitioners, 
and to study the profession. A general discussion of Teacher 
Education may be found in Teacher Education Programs in 
chapter 7. 

Departments of the School of Education that offer under- 
graduate programs are listed below. Students seeking further 
information on graduate-level programs are referred to The 
Graduate School Bulletin. 



School of Education Undergraduate Areas of Study 



Department 



Degree Major 



Hours Reg 



Area of Study— AOS Code 



Teacher Education B.S. 

& Higher Education B.S. 



Elementary Education 122 
Middle Grades Educ 122 



♦ Elementary Educ — U251 (K-6 licensure) 

♦ Middle Grades Educ— U254 (6-9 licensure) 



Teacher Education 
& Higher Education 
and Specialized Education 
Services 



B.S. 



Dual Major: 


127 


♦ 


Elementary Education 






& Special Education: 






General Curriculum 






Professions in Deafness 


126 


♦ 




126 


♦ 




125 


♦ 




128 


♦ 




127 


♦ 



Elementary Education 

& Special Education— U252 



Specialized Education 
Services 



B.S. 



20 



Advocacy & Services for the Deaf — U931 

American Sign Language Teacher Licensure — 

U933 

Auditory-Oral/B-K Licensure— U261 

Interpreter Preparation — U932 

K-12 Hearing Impaired Teacher Preparation 

Licensure — U145 

American Sign Language/Deaf Studies 
(minor)— U930 



B.S. 



Special Education: 
General Curriculum 



127 ♦ Special Education— U265 (K-12 licensure) 



Specialized Education 
Services and 
Teacher Education 
& Higher Education 



B.S. Dual Major: 

Elementary Education 
& Special Education: 
General Curriculum 



127 ♦ Elementary Education 

& Special Education— U252 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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Academic Units 



School of Health and Human 
Performance 

401 Health and Human Performance Building 

Celia R. Hooper, Professor and Dean of School 

Kathleen Williams, Professor and Associate Dean for Academic 

Programs 
William N. Dudley, Professor and Associate Dean for Research 

In the School of Health and Human Performance, aca- 
demic programs are offered through the Department of 
Communication Sciences and Disorders, the Department of 
Dance, the Department of Kinesiology, the Department of 
Public Health Education, the Department of Recreation, Tour- 
ism, and Hospitality Management including the Hospitality 
and Tourism Management Program. Each department offers 
varied courses for all University students and programs of 
study leading to undergraduate majors and minors in their 
respective areas. Graduate degrees in Dance, Communica- 
tion Sciences and Disorders, Public Health Education, Rec- 
reation, Tourism, and Hospitality Management, and Exercise 
and Sport Science are also offered. The School's programs are 
designed to meet specialized interests of students and also 
the requirements of state and national accrediting agencies 
and professional associations. 

The Department of Communication Sciences and Dis- 
orders provides opportunities for the study of normal speech, 
language, and hearing and the associated disorders, leading 
to the Bachelor of Science degree in Speech Pathology and 
Audiology. The courses offered in this program are pre- 
professional and prepare the student for further study at the 
graduate level. Faculty and students in Communication Sci- 
ences and Disorders provide services to clients in the Univer- 
sity Speech and Hearing Center, and engage in cooperative 
work with area schools, hospitals, and other human service 
agencies. In addition, the faculty and students in Communica- 
tion Sciences and Disorders are actively involved in research. 

In the Department of Dance, the Bachelor of Fine Arts 
degree provides a Dance major with an emphasis in chore- 
ography and performance. The Department of Dance will 
not offer Teacher Licensure for students entering after spring 
2007. Students may prepare for initial licensure through 
North Carolina's Regional Alternative Licensure Centers for 
Lateral Entry Teachers (lateral entry teachers must have an 
undergraduate degree but are allowed up to three years to 
obtain the teaching licensure). The Bachelor of Arts degree in 
Dance offers concentrations in a variety of areas; it is espe- 
cially appropriate for students who wish to double major. 
A Concentration in Community Dance for individuals who 
wish to work as dance artists with underserved populations 
is available to students in any of the Department's majors. A 
Dance minor and master's degree are also available. 

The Department of Kinesiology offers the major in 
Exercise and Sport Science leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree. Within Exercise Science and Sport Studies, students 
may select concentrations in Fitness Leadership or Sports 
Medicine. The ESS Pedagogy concentration prepares students 
for teaching in grades K-12 (licensure track) or in Community 
Youth Sport Development (non-licensure track). Exercise Sci- 



ence and Sport Studies prepares students for careers in pre- 
ventive and rehabilitative exercise and fitness, and may be 
tailored to meet the needs and interests of students planning 
graduate study in athletic training, medicine, occupational 
therapy, or physical therapy. This department also offers 
graduate studies leading to the master's degree and doctoral 
degrees. 

The Department of Public Health Education offers 
the Public Health major, leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree. Within the Public Health major, students may select 
a concentration in Community Health Education or Health 
Studies. The Community Health Education concentration is a 
professional program preparing graduates to become Health 
Educators. The requirements of the Community Health Edu- 
cation concentration meet the professional standards of the 
field of Health Education allowing graduating students to sit 
for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) national 
credentialing exam. A Health Studies concentration is avail- 
able for those looking for a pre-professional or non-profes- 
sional degree option. A Health Studies minor is also available. 
The department also offers graduate studies leading to a Mas- 
ter of Public Health (M.P.H.) degree and the Doctor of Pub- 
lic Health (Dr.P.H.) degree in community health education. 
As a complement to the academic enterprise of the depart- 
ment, faculty, and students within Public Health Education 
are also actively involved in local and national research and 
outreach. 

In the Department of Recreation, Tourism, and Hos- 
pitality Management a student majoring in Recreation and 
Parks Management may choose from three areas of concentra- 
tion: Leisure Services Management, Therapeutic Recreation, 
or Commercial Recreation and Special Event Management. 
These concentrations lead to the Bachelor of Science degree. 
A Recreation and Parks Management minor and a minor in 
Travel, Tourism, and Commercial Recreation, in addition to a 
Master of Science (M.S.) degree, are also available. The under- 
graduate program has been fully accredited by the NRPA/ 
AALR Council on Accreditation since 1981. 

The Hospitality and Tourism Management Program 
offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Hospitality and Tourism 
Management with two concentrations: Hotel and Restau- 
rant Management and Travel and Tourism Management. The 
Bachelor of Arts degree balances business, hospitality, and 
tourism classes with work in the field through student intern- 
ships. Students are able to gain valuable industry experience 
and develop a professional industry network over the course 
of this degree program. Opportunities for international study 
are also available. Faculty and students in Recreation, Tour- 
ism, and Hospitality Management are actively engaged in 
community-based research at the local, state, national, and 
international arenas. 

Further details about specific major programs can be 
found in the alphabetical Department listings on the fol- 
lowing page. Graduate degree programs and graduate-level 
courses are described in The Graduate School Bulletin. 



100 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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School of Health and Human Performance Undergraduate Areas of Study 

Department D egree Major Hours Reg Area of Study — AOS Code 



Communication Sciences 
& Disorders 


B.S. 


Speech Pathology 
& Audiology 


122 


♦ Speech Pathology & Audiology- 


-U143 


Dance 


B.A. 
B.F.A. 


Dance 
Dance 


122 
128 


♦ Dance Studies— U435 

♦ Dance B.F.A.— U431 





Kinesiology 



B.S. 



Exercise & Sport Science 



122 
122 
122 

125-128 

124 
21 



Exercise Science & Sport Studies 

♦ Aquatic Instructor Leadership — U423 

♦ Fitness Leadership — U412 

♦ Sports Medicine— U421 

Exercise Pedagogy 

♦ Physical Educ Teacher Educ — U409 
(Spec Subj Area lie) 

♦ Community Youth Sport Development — U422 

♦ Sport Coaching (minor) — U410 



Public Health Education 



B.S. 



Health Education 



122 ♦ Community Health Educ- 
♦ Health Studies— U448 



-U407 



Recreation, Tourism, B.S. 

and Hospitality Management 



Recreation and Parks 
Management 



122 



15 



15 



B.A. 



Hospitality and Tourism 1 22 
Management 

15 



♦ Leisure Services Management — U419 

♦ Therapeutic Recreation — U413 

♦ Commercial Recreation and Special Event 
Management — U41 4 

♦ Recreation and Parks Management 
(minor)— U418 

♦ Travel, Tourism, & Commercial Recreation 
(minor)— U426 

♦ Hotel & Restaurant Management — U452 

♦ Travel & Tourism Management — U453 

» Hospitality & Tourism (minor) — U450 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



101 



Academic Units 



School of Human Environmental 
Sciences 

235 Stone Building 

Laura S. Sims, Professor and Dean 

Marion O'Brien, Professor and Associate Dean 

John C. Rife, Professor and Associate Dean 

Programs within the School of Human Environmental 
Sciences prepare students for careers in the field of applied 
human sciences. Our science-based teaching and research 
programs focus on humans in multiple environmental con- 
texts. 

Students receive a broad-based liberal education that 
includes University requirements and School requirements 
along with the courses required for their particular majors. 
Our programs are unique in their ability to utilize basic prin- 
ciples from many disciplines to solve human problems and to 
meet social needs. 



The strong research efforts within the School serve to 
enhance and support highly challenging undergraduate pro- 
grams. The five majors offered are: 

Consumer, Apparel, & Retail Studies 

Human Development & Family Studies 

Interior Architecture 

Nutrition 

Social Work 

Special facilities of the School of Human Environmental 
Sciences include six classrooms associated with the Child Care 
Education Program and the Historic Costume and Textile 
Collection, the Family Research Center, the North Carolina 
Agricultural Research Service, the Human Environmental 
Sciences Office of Research, Computer Aided Design labora- 
tories in Interior Architecture and Apparel Product Design, 
the Apparel Production Management Center, the Harris Tee- 
ter, Inc. and The Dickson Foundation Cellular and Molecular 
Nutrition Research Laboratory, Center for Innovation in Inte- 
rior Architecture, and the Center for New North Carolinians. 



School of Human Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Areas of Study 
Department 



Degree Major 



Hours Req 



Area of Study— AOS Code 



Consumer, Apparel, 


B.S. 


Consumer, Apparel, 


122 


♦ Apparel Product Design — U538 


& Retail Studies 




& Retail Studies 




♦ Retailing & Consumer Studies — U539 

♦ Global Apparel & Related Industries— U864 



Human Development 
& Family Studies 



B.S. Human Development 

& Family Studies 



122 ♦ Birth thru Kindergarten Teh Licensure— U526 

♦ Child & Adolescent Development 
in the Family— U508 

♦ Early Care & Education— U531 

♦ Family Studies— U530 

18 • Human Development & Family Studies 
(minor) — U514 



Interior Architecture 



B.S. 



Interior Architecture 



127 



♦ Interior Architecture — U540 



Nutrition 



B.S. 



Nutrition 



122 ♦ Nutrition Science— U550 

♦ Human Nutrition & Dietetics- 

♦ Nutrition & Wellness— U533 



-U552 





— 




18 


• Nutrition (minor) — U553 


Social Work 


B.S.W. 


Social Work 


122 
15 


♦ Social Work— U894 

♦ School Social Work Licensure — U895 

♦ Social Work (minor)— U894 



102 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Units 



Lloyd International Honors College 

205 Foust Building 
336/334-5538 " 
http://honorscollege.uncg.edu 

Jerry Pubantz, Professor and Director of the College 

Stacey Peebles, Assistant Director 

Ryan Radford, Honors Advisor 

Sarah A. Krive, Assistant Director 

Mark Hens, Director Undergraduate Scholars Program 

Melvalyn Pate, Administrative Assistant 

Lloyd International Honors College, a member of the 
National Collegiate Honors Council, provides able and moti- 
vated undergraduate students with an enhanced and sup- 
portive intellectual and social experience that acculturates 
them to the life of the mind and helps them to become critical, 
independent thinkers who are active in the design and pur- 
suit of their own education, and prepared to lead successful 
and fulfilling professional, civic, and personal lives. Through 
enhanced academic opportunities, the inclusion of interna- 
tional and global perspectives, a variety of co-curricular and 
extra-curricular activities, and the camaraderie of top students 
and faculty, Lloyd International Honors College provides its 
students with opportunities and challenges that will benefit 
them for a lifetime. Along the way, Lloyd International Hon- 
ors College staff stands ready to provide guidance, support, 
and encouragement to help students craft a program of study 
that meets their individual needs and interests, and opens up 
new possibilities for the future. 

Admission to Lloyd International Honors College 

Admission to Lloyd International Honors College is 
required to take Honors courses and to participate in many of 
the Lloyd International Honors College's activities. To apply 
for admission, students must submit a completed application 
form for the International Honors Program or the Disciplin- 
ary Honors Program. All application forms are available on 
the Lloyd International Honors College Web site. Minimum 
requirements to be considered for admission depend on the 
applicant's status at the time of application. 

Incoming First-Year Students 

Either a combined SAT math + critical reading score of 
1200 (ACT composite score of 27), or a weighted high school 
GPA of 3.80. The SAT math, verbal, and writing test scores 
must all be submitted on the application. If the writing score 
is significantly lower than the verbal and math scores, the 
application runs the risk of being rejected. If the writing test 
score is especially high, the application may be accepted even 
if the high school weighted GPA and the combined math + 
verbal score is not quite at minimum levels. 

Transfer Students 

An aggregate GPA of 3.30 from all former institutions. 
Transcripts to verify the aggregate GPA should be submitted 
from all prior institutions attended. 

Continuing UNCG Students 

Continuing UNCG students must have at least a 3.30 GPA. 



Lloyd International Honors College Petition Policy 

Incoming first-year UNCG students who do not meet one 
of the specified criteria for admission to the Lloyd International 
Honors College (LIHC) may petition the Director for admission. 
When the candidate makes a persuasive case that he or she is 
fully capable of succeeding in International Honors, the Director 
may admit the student. A student admitted through the petition 
process will be expected to meet all of the requirements for main- 
taining good standing in the International Honors Program, and 
is subject to the same rules as other Honors College students, 
including the conditions requiring suspension or removal from 
LIHC 

Programs 

Lloyd International Honors College offers two enhanced 
academic programs— the International Honors Program 
and the Disciplinary Honors Program. Students interested 
in pursuing these programs must consult with an Interna- 
tional Honors College advisor before enrolling in Honors 
courses. 

The International Honors Program is designed to comple- 
ment and enrich the University's General-Education Program 
for students in any major. Students who complete the Inter- 
national Honors Program replace regular general-education 
courses with Honors general-education courses, reach a basic 
level of language competency in a second language, and com- 
plete a semester of study abroad, thus providing themselves 
with a solid liberal education with international and global 
perspectives, that is a valuable foundation for study in any 
major and for life after graduation. 

The Disciplinary Honors Program allows students in all 
majors to do Honors work in their majors or in upper-division 
interdisciplinary studies. Through Disciplinary Honors, stu- 
dents have the opportunity to study topics in depth and to 
do research under the supervision of a faculty member, thus 
giving themselves a competitive advantage when applying to 
graduate school or beginning a career. 

Students who complete the International Honors Pro- 
gram and the Disciplinary Honors Program are recognized 
for their high achievement and awarded Full University Hon- 
ors. 

Courses 

Honors courses are taught by faculty members who 
are among the best at UNCG, who are deeply engaged with 
their disciplines, and who are dedicated to helping students 
achieve their greatest potential. Honors courses are typically 
small (20-25 students) and foster discussion, collaboration, 
and mutual discovery among students and faculty. Typically, 
Honors courses fulfill a variety of University and departmen- 
tal requirements. 

There are several types of Honors courses: 

• Honors Seminars in which students explore inter- 
disciplinary topics in greater breadth and/or depth 
than in typical courses while fulfilling General 
Education Core requirements; 

• Honors sections of regular UNCG courses that 
allow students to explore other topics or continue 
to do Honors work in their major; 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



103 



Academic Units 



• Honors Tutorials and Honors Independent Study 
through which students either individually or in 
small groups work with a professor on a topic of 
mutual interest; 

• the Senior Honors Project in which a student, under 
the guidance of a professor, produces a research 
project. 

• Honors Contract courses that allow students to 
enhance a regular undergraduate course and 
receive Honors credit for that course. Note: Honors 
Contract courses can be used only to fulfill Disciplinary 
Honors Program requirements; they cannot be used to 
fulfill International Honors Program requirements. 

The variety of Honors courses, and particularly the 
chance to customize one's curriculum through tutorials and 
independent studies, means that students have considerable 
control over their own education. Moreover, many of the 
advanced Honors courses, such as the Senior Honors Project, 
allow students to do original and sophisticated work, and are 
an excellent preparation for graduate school, professional 
training, and other post-graduation endeavors. 

Honors Advising 

Lloyd International Honors College staff offers top-rate 
group and individual advising to help students discover the 
best ways to take advantage of Honors at UNCG, and to make 
sure that students have the needed support and encourage- 
ment along the way to completing their degrees. A variety 
of informal information sessions and colloquia are also pro- 
vided for students interested in talking about particular top- 
ics of interest such as study abroad, internships, or graduate 
school. 

Extra-Curricular Activities and Student 
Involvement 

Lloyd International Honors College sponsors a number 
of extracurricular events. Among these events are weekly 
coffees where students and faculty get together to discuss 
various issues, the annual Raft Debate, the annual Student 
Symposium, lectures and special performances, field trips, 
dinners with faculty, and community service projects. 

Honors Abroad Experiences 

In collaboration with UNCG's Office of International Pro- 
grams, Lloyd International Honors College offers competitive 
Honors Abroad Experiences for Honors students interested in 
an Honors enhanced study abroad experience at select loca- 
tions. To be considered, students must (1) submit an Honors 
Abroad application to Lloyd International Honors College 
and (2) be accepted for study abroad at an appropriate loca- 
tion by the Office of International Programs. Accepted stu- 
dents are given a grant to defray travel costs associated with 
studying abroad, and an all-expenses paid (except for food) 
week at a foreign location with a UNCG faculty member. 

Students accepted into an Honors Abroad Experience 
enroll in HSS 310, a three-credit Honors course, in addition 
to whatever courses are taken at the foreign university. HSS 
310 requires that students meet with a UNCG faculty member 
before traveling abroad to discuss readings about their trip and 
the character of the country they are about to visit. Students 
and the UNCG faculty member then spend approximately a 
week exploring and taking in cultural activities abroad before 



students go to their foreign university for the semester. Dur- 
ing their semester, students take classes, travel, and engage 
in a variety of writing assignments that allow them to reflect 
on their experience. Finally, students gather for a colloquium 
upon returning to UNCG the following semester. 

Scholarships 

Lloyd International Honors College administers the 
prestigious Undergraduate Scholars Program, a merit schol- 
arship program (see the Merit Awards Program entry in the 
Expenses, Payments, Refunds, and Financial Aid chapter of 
this Bulletin for details). Membership in Lloyd International 
Honors College is not required to apply; however, all mem- 
bers of the Undergraduate Scholars Program are strongly 
encouraged to join Lloyd International Honors College. 

Lloyd International Honors College also offers the Lich- 
tin Family Honors Scholarship, a competitive, merit award 
for a rising junior or senior Honors student who plans on 
continuing to participate in Honors. 

For students interested in competing for nationally com- 
petitive scholarships and fellowships, many of which provide 
support for graduate study both in the U.S. and abroad, the 
Lloyd International Honors College provides in-depth advice 
and support. Students who wish to complete an application 
are given hands on coaching to assure that their application 
is of the highest quality. Among the scholarships and fellow- 
ships that students may compete for are the Fulbright, the 
Rhodes, the Marshall, the Goldwater, the Mellon, the Truman, 
and the Udall. Recent UNCG students have received awards 
for study in such diverse locations as Canada, Germany, Sri 
Lanka, Mali, and Trinidad. 

Honors Awards 

Lloyd International Honors College administers awards 
that recognize high achievement. At the Honors Convoca- 
tion every spring, the College bestows the Student Excellence 
Award, the University's highest undergraduate honor, on out- 
standing seniors. The College also hosts an annual banquet to 
honor those students who have successfully completed one of 
Lloyd International Honors College's programs. 



104 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Academic Units 



School of Music 

220 Music Building 

John J. Deal, Professor and Dean of School 
William P. Carroll, Professor and Associate Dean 

The School of Music is an accredited institutional mem- 
ber of the National Association of Schools of Music. The 
requirements for entrance and graduation as set forth in this 
catalog are in accordance with the published regulations of 
the National Association of Schools of Music. The School of 
Music is the sole representative of the State of North Caro- 
lina to the National Association of Music Executives in State 
Universities. 

The School of Music offers the only comprehensive 
music program from undergraduate through doctoral study 
in both performance and music education in North Carolina. 
Unlike either more specialized programs in conservatory- 
type institutions or more general curricula encountered in 
most departments of music, studies in the School of Music 
complement rigorous professional training with that broad 
liberal education necessary for students both to function as 
informed, responsible citizens and, concurrently, to commu- 
nicate most effectively as musicians. 

The Bachelor of Music degree in Performance is a pro- 
fessional music degree that prepares students for future 
careers as performers, composers, and/or teachers; it requires 
students to spend approximately two-thirds of their time in 
music study. 



The Bachelor of Music degree in Music Education pre- 
pares students for positions as choral directors or teachers 
of general music (principal performance area usually voice, 
piano, or organ) or for positions as instrumental directors 
(principal performance area in orchestral or band instruments) 
in public schools; it requires students to spend approximately 
two-thirds of their time in music and teacher licensure study. 

The Bachelor of Music degree in Jazz Studies is a profes- 
sional music degree that prepares students for future careers 
in jazz performance, composition/arranging, and pedagogy It 
requires students to spend approximately two-thirds of their 
time in music study. The principal instruments are saxophone, 
trumpet, trombone, piano, guitar, bass, and percussion. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Music is a liberal arts 
degree that provides valuable undergraduate preparation 
for a variety of careers; it requires students to spend approxi- 
mately one-third of their time in music study. Exceptions to 
prescribed degree programs must have written approval of 
the Dean of the School of Music. 

All prospective music majors and minors must audi- 
tion for members of the music faculty for acceptance into 
the School of Music and for approval of the major or prin- 
cipal performance area. Such auditions should be arranged 
through the School of Music; recorded auditions are not usu- 
ally accepted from applicants who live in the United States. 
Composition majors should submit scores and/or recordings 
of completed compositions. Successful audition/composition 
submission results are valid for one calendar year. 

Please see chapter 7 for complete School of Music require- 
ments, programs, and courses. 



School of Music Undergraduate Areas of Study 

School Degree Major Hours Reg 



Area of Study— AOS Code 



Music 



B.A. Music 

B.M. Jazz Studies 

B.M. Music Education 

B.M. Performance 



123 
123 

125 

123 

125 



♦ General Music— U602 

♦ Jazz Performance — U618 

saxophone, trumpet, trombone, piano, guitar, 
bass, percussion 

♦ Choral/General Music Educ— U626 (Special 
Subject Area Licensure) 

♦ Instrumental/General Music Educ — U629 
(Special Subject Area Licensure) 

♦ Composition — U607 

♦ Instrument Performance — U61 1 
strings, brass, woodwinds, percussion 

♦ Keyboard Performance — U636 

♦ Voice Performance — U635 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



105 



Academic Units 



School of Nursing 

112 Moore Nursing Building 

Lynne G. Pearcey, Professor and Dean 
Anita S. Tesh, Associate Professor and Associate Dean 
Eileen M. Kohlenberg, Associate Professor and Associate Dean 
Debra C. Wallace, Professor and Associate Dean 

Mission Statement 

As an integral academic unit of The University of North Carolina 
at Greensboro, the School of Nursing is dedicated to teaching, 
research, and service that contribute to the maintenance and improve- 
ment of health for individuals, families, and communities. With a 
commitment to excellence, the School of Nursing provides mutually 
supportive undergraduate and graduate nursing programs. 

Students are afforded opportunities at various stages of their lives 
to obtain an education that is firmly grounded in the liberal arts, con- 
gruent with standards for professional nursing practice, and prepara- 
tory for lifelong learning and professional development. Tlie School 
of Nursing is dedicated to the primacy of teaching that is based in 
scholarship and to the advanc ement of knowledge through research. 
The intellectual resources of the School of Nursing are used to proinde 
professional and public services to a global society. 

As part of an urban university, the School of Nursing recognizes 
its responsibility to provide exemplary learning environments on 
campus, through distance education, and in underserved areas of 
North Carolina. The School of Nursing is committed to sustaining a 
community in ivhich women and men of any racial or ethnic identity, 
age or background are motivated to develop their full potential and to 
achieve an informed appreciation of their own and different cultures. 

The School of Nursing offers an undergraduate program 
leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. The first 
two years of study are in general education, basic sciences, 
humanities, and basic nursing. The majority of work in the 
junior and senior years is in nursing. 

The School of Nursing offers a Master of Science in Nurs- 
ing degree to prepare persons for a leadership role in nursing 
education, administration, and clinical practice. This program 
has a strong research emphasis and is founded on specializa- 
tion in clinical practice. The School, along with the Bryan 
School of Business and Economics, offers the M.S.N./M.B.A. 
The School of Nursing offers the Ph.D. in Nursing to prepare 
nurses as scientists in academia and industry. 

Accreditation 

The pre-licensure program offered by the School of 
Nursing is approved by the North Carolina Board of Nurs- 
ing. The B.S.N, program is accredited by the National League 
for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). For informa- 
tion, contact the NLNAC at 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 
500, Atlanta, Georgia 30326, or on the Web at www.nlnac. 
org. 



The B.S.N, program is accredited by the Commission on 
Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), One Dupont Circle, 
NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120, 202/887-6791. 

Philosophy 

The philosophy of the faculty at the School of Nursing is 
a statement of the beliefs and values they hold about the disci- 
pline and profession of nursing, as well as nursing education. 
The conceptual framework and the goals of the undergradu- 
ate and graduate programs are built upon this philosophy. 

Nursing is both a practice discipline and a profession. 
Comprising the discipline is a unique body of knowledge that 
is integral to nursing practice, nursing education, and nurs- 
ing administration. The body of knowledge is continuously 
developed and refined as an outcome of scientific, historical, 
philosophical, and ethical inquiry and clinical evaluation. 
Nursing knowledge is generated about health experiences 
and behaviors of persons across the life span. Clinical evalu- 
ation advances nursing knowledge through the testing and 
validation of interventions that are used in nursing practice, 
nursing education, and nursing administration. The metapar- 
adigm concepts of person, environment, health, and nursing 
form the foundation upon which inquiry and the profession 
are based. 

Professional nurses use knowledge developed by the dis- 
cipline to promote optimal health in people and to achieve 
professional goals. Nursing is an essential component of the 
health care delivery system and includes the promotion of 
wellness, the detection of alterations in health, and the provi- 
sion of care for those with illness, disease, or dysfunctions. 
Professional nursing is characterized by inquiry, caring, and 
practice. Nurses are professionally, ethically, and legally 
accountable for the care they provide, and their practice 
includes independent and interdependent functions. 

Professional nursing education is built upon a foundation 
of liberal arts, humanities, and the sciences, and it provides 
opportunities for learners to attain competencies required to 
practice professional nursing. Mature learners identify their 
own learning needs and assume responsibility for contin- 
ued learning. Effective teachers establish an inviting learning 
environment that promotes collaboration among themselves 
and their learners for achievement of educational goals. Bac- 
calaureate education prepares nurses to function as general- 
ists, while education at the master's level prepares nurses as 
advanced practitioners in a speciality area. 

At the doctoral level, nurses are prepared as scientists to 
practice in academia and industry. 

Please see chapter 7 for complete details on School of 
Nursing admission, policies, requirements, programs, and 
courses. 



School of Nursing Undergraduate Areas of Study 

School Degree Major Hours Reg 



Area of Study— AOS Code 



Nursing 



B.S.N. Nursing 



122 ♦ Nursing— U701 

122 ♦ Nursing/RN to B.S.N.— U702 

122 ♦ Nursing/RN 2Plus Program— U710 



106 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



7. Departments, Programs, 

& Courses 



Department of 
Accounting and Finance 

Bryan School of Business & Economics 

418 Bryan Building 
336/334-5647 * 
www. u ncg . ed u/bae/acc 

Faculty 

William O. Brown, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Arrington, Winkler 

Associate Professors Balbirer, Harden, Iyer 

Assistant Professors Huang, Kolbasovsky, Livingstone, Shough, 

Upton 
Lecturers Hersberger, Khanlarian, Milanese 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Accounting and Finance of the 
Joseph M. Bryan School of Business and Economics is (1) to provide 
high quality programs of education for accounting and finance majors 
at the undergraduate and graduate levels, (2) to provide high quality 
courses to support the undergraduate and graduate programs offered 
by the Bryan School and the University at large, (3) to simulate and 
support productive, high quality research, scholarship, and publica- 
tion, (4) to provide service, largely through committee representation 
to the University, the Bryan School, the Department, the Academic 
Accounting and Finance Community, and the Accounting profes- 
sion, and (5) to foster faculty interaction with the public in ways that 
enhance the common good. 

The primary goal of the department is to provide pro- 
grams of quality education in accounting and finance at the 
undergraduate and graduate levels. The undergraduate pro- 
gram provides an excellent foundation for careers in indus- 
try, government and other not-for-profit organizations; is 
sufficiently broad to qualify graduates for a wide range of 
entry-level, business-related positions; and prepares students 
for further graduate-level studies in areas such as accounting, 
finance, law, and business administration. 

The Department of Accounting and Finance also offers 
a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in finance. The 
undergraduate finance program deals with the theory, orga- 
nization, and operation of the financial system from both a 
market and a managerial viewpoint. Students are expected 
to develop analytical abilities and to present their analyses in 
both written and oral form. 

Undergraduate majors are offered a broad range of 
courses from the areas of financial management, financial 
institutions, and investments. 

Graduates may take managerial positions in controllership 
or treasury work in non-financial businesses as well as a wide 
array of careers in financial services and banking. In addition, 
the degree may lead to positions in risk management and real 
estate departments of public agencies and private corporations 
as well as insurance and real estate companies. 



At the graduate level, the Bryan School offers courses 
in finance as part of the Master of Business Administration 
(M.B.A.) program. 

Student Learning Goals 

Critical thinking, quantitative aptitude, teamwork, and 
good communication skills are necessary to function effec- 
tively in today's highly competitive, global environment. In 
order to assure that our graduates are prepared to meet the 
challenges of the future. 

• Accounting students will be able to evaluate and 
appraise the ethical comportments of accounting action 
in the context of public trust and stewardship. 

• Accounting students will be able to produce, evaluate, 
and modify transactions-based accounting records in a 
manner adequate to entry-level professional accounting 
positions. 

• Accounting students will author professional account- 
ing documents at a level of quality commensurate with 
employer expectations. 

• Accounting students will be able to create and use cost 
accounting information in a business decision-making 
context. 

• Finance students will be able to create forward-looking 
financial statements. 

• Finance students will be able to analyze the current 
financial condition of the firm. 

• Finance students will be able to thoroughly understand 
the mathematical process and application of capital 
budgeting. 

• Finance Students will thoroughly understand the con- 
cepts of the time value of money (TVM), the characteris- 
tics of traditional financial securities, and the valuation 
of these securities. 

Accounting Major (ACCT) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U301 

General Program Requirements 

1. Formal admission to the Department of Accounting, 
including the following: 

a. Successful completion of ACC 202, 218; CST 105; 
ECO 201, 202, 250; ENG 101 (or FMS 115 or RCO 
101), ENG 102 or other approved ENG course; ISM 
110, 280; and MAT 120 or 191 

b. Grades of C or better in ACC 202, 218, ECO 201, 
and ISM 280 

c. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 

2. Grades of C or better in all ACC courses used toward 
the major. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



107 



Accounting & Finance 



3. 122 s.h. 

4. At least 50 percent of the business semester hours 
required for the degree must be earned at UNCG. 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Department specifies courses for: 
One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

foreign language XXX 203B ( e.g., SPA203B) 
or equivalent 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

MAT 120 or 191 
Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

PHI 361 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 (or FMS 115 or RCO 101), and CST 105 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

ECO 201 and 202 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers: 3-6 s.h. (1-2 
courses) of the same foreign language depending upon 
placement; 2-3 additional GL/GN courses, one of which 
must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III Major and Related Area Requirements 

1 . ACC 202, 218, 318, 319, 325, 330, 420, 440, 450 (Transfer 
credit will be given for Accounting courses at the 300 
level or above only by examination.) 

2. BUS 105A**; CST 105*; ECO 201*, 202*, 250, 300*; ENG 
101, ENG 102 or other approved ENG course; FIN 315; 
ISM 110, 280; MAT 120* or 191*; MGT 301*, 309*, 312, 
330 or 331, 491; MKT 320; SCM 302 



3. Nine (9) s.h. of a foreign language*; see chapter 6 for 

requirement details. 
*MAT 120 or 191 fulfills GMT; CST 105 fulfills GRD; ECO 201 
and 202 fulfill GSB; ECO 300, MGT 301, and foreign language 
fulfills 9-12 semester hours of GL/GN requirement; MGT 309 
fulfills major WI and SI; CST 105 fulfills SI outside major. 
**BUS 105A is for students entering UNCG as freshmen and 
must he taken during the first two semesters of enrollment. 

IV Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

Accounting Minor 
Required: minimum of 15 s.h. 
AOSCode: U719 

The accounting minor is available to any UNCG stu- 
dent, other than ACCT majors, who is in good standing in the 
University. The minor complements a variety of professional 
and arts and sciences fields. It focuses on various accounting 
principles in order for students to be more successful in the 
professional pursuits. 

Requirements: 

1. Admission to the minor. See Undergraduate Stu- 
dent Services, 232 Bryan. 

2. To receive credit for the minor, the student must 
achieve a grade of C or better in all courses taken 
for the Accounting minor. 

3. ACC 218, 202, 318, and an additional six (6) s.h. of 
upper division accounting courses at the 300 or 400 
level, for a total of 15 s.h., nine (9) of which must be 
successfully completed at UNCG. 

Honors in Accounting 
Requirements 

For Honors requirements, check with the departmental 
office and see Honors Programs in this chapter. 

Accelerated Master's Program for Accounting 
Majors 

Interested students should see Accelerated Master's 
Programs for Undergraduates for details about the B.S. in 
Accounting/M.S. in Accounting program requirements. 

Finance Major (FINC) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U360 

General Program Requirements 

1. Formal admission to Finance major: 

a. Successful completion of ACC 201 or 218; ACC 
202; CST 105; ECO 201, 202, 250; ENG 101 (or FMS 
115 or RCO 101), ENG 102 or other approved ENG 
course; ISM 110, 280; MAT 120 or 191 

b. Grade of Cor better in ACC 202, 218 

c. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 



108 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Accounting & Finance 



2. Grades of C or better in all ACC and FIN courses used 
toward the major. 

3. 122 s.h. 

4. At least 50 percent of the business semester hours 
required for the degree must be earned at UNCG 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Department specifies courses for: 
One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

foreign language XXX 203B (e.g., SPA 203B) 
or equivalent 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

MAT 120 or 191 
Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

PHI 361 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and CST 105 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

ECO 201 and 202 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers: 3-6 s.h. (1-2 
courses) of the same foreign language depending upon 
placement; 2-3 additional GL/GN courses, one of which 
must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III Major Requirements 

1. FIN 330, 410, 442, 450 

2. At least two additional courses selected from: FIN 320, 
325, 420, 430, 444, 449, 493, 499; ACC 318, 319, 330, 420; 
ECO 351 



IV Related Area Requirements 

1. ACC 201 or 218; ACC 202; BUS 105A**; CST 105*; 
ECO 201*, 202*, 250, 300*; ENG 101*, ENG 102 or other 
approved ENG course; FIN 315; ISM 110, 280; MAT 120* 
or 191*; MGT 301*, 309*, 312, 330, 491; MKT 320; SCM 
302 

2. Nine (9) s.h. of a foreign language; see chapter 6 for 
requirement details. 

*MAT 120 or 191 fulfills GMT; ENG 101 or CST 105 fulfill GRD; 
ECO 201 and 202 fulfill GSB; ECO 300, MGT 301, and foreign 
language fulfill 9-12 semester hours ofGE/GN requirement; MGT 
309 fulfills major WI and SI requirements; CST 105 fulfills SI 
requirement outside major. 

**BUS 105A is for students entering UNCG as freshmen and 
must be taken during the first two semesters of enrollment. Stu- 
dents are encouraged to take BUS 105 during their first semester if 
space is available. 

V Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 122 total semester hours 
required for the degree. 

Accounting Courses (ACC) 

Enrollment in Accounting courses requires a minimum 2.0 
GPA on UNCG course work, regardless of a student's major 
or minor. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

201 Financial Accounting (3:3) 

Pr. MAT 115 
Introduction to external financial statements of organizations, 
emphasizing the use of accounting information in making invest- 
ment and other decisions. Addresses ethical considerations and 
role of financial reporting in society. 

202 Managerial Accounting (3:3) 

Pr. ACC 201 or 218 
Introduction to internal accounting and reporting of organiza- 
tions, emphasizing the use of accounting information used by 
management and other decision makers within the organization. 

218 Financial Statement Preparation and Disclosures (3:3) 

Pr. MAT 115 

• Required entry course for all Accounting and Finance majors 
First financial accounting course for students desiring to pursue 
upper division accounting courses. Includes coverage of basic 
financial statement preparation, time value of money concepts, 
and techniques for accounting valuations. 

318 Intermediate Accounting I (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in ACC 218 and ECO 201 
Focuses on the conceptual framework underlying financial report- 
ing by business enterprises, the processes by which authoritative 
accounting guidelines are promulgated, and the preparation, 
presentation, interpretation, and use of financial statements. 

319 Intermediate Accounting II (3:3) 

Pr. grade of Cor better in ACC 318 
The second course in the two-course intermediate accounting 
sequence. Continues the examination of the preparation, presen- 
tation, interpretation, and use of financial statements. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



109 



Accounting & Finance 



325 Accounting Transaction Processing Systems (3:3) 

Pr. admission to program or other approved program; grade ofC or 
better in ACC 318 
Designed to provide an understanding of a variety of account- 
ing subsystems, systems analysis, and design issues reinforced 
through case studies. 

330 Cost Accounting (3:3) 

Pr. grades ofC or better in ACC 202 and 318 
Costs and cost accounting principles, costing systems, cost deter- 
mination procedures; control and analytical practices for mana- 
gerial decision-making. 

350 Internship in Accounting (3:0:20) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in ACC 318; admission to the Accounting 
program; permission of internship coordinator 
This course provides students with an opportunity to apply 
accounting knowledge in a business environment and to gain a 
better understanding of the accounting profession. 

420 Federal Tax Concepts (3:3) 

Pr. admission to program or other approved program; grade ofC or 
better in ACC 318 
Tax structure and tax principles. Accounting principles and pro- 
cedures related to tax accounting. Application of tax and account- 
ing principles to specific problems 

440 Auditing Concepts (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in ACC 319 and 325; admission to program 
or other approved program 
Concepts underlying audit process, procedures used in external 
auditing, statistical application, preparation of audit programs, 
and reports. Use of audit software to conduct control risk assess- 
ment and substantive tests. 

450 Accounting, Ethics, and International Business (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in ACC 319, admission to Department or 
other professional program approved by Department 
First half of course focuses on ethical import of accounting in 
modern organizations; second half of course focuses on account- 
ing practices and regulations in different countries. 

460 Capstone Experience in Systems Assurance (3:3) 

Pr. admission to program or other approved program; grade of Cor 
better in ACC 319, 325; ISM 240, 301, 318 
Course represents the culmination of a student's experience in 
the Accounting and Information Systems major. Students will 
apply concepts and design an AIS to support a company's busi- 
ness processes. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

499 Independent Research in Accounting (1-3) 

Pr. admission to program, senior standing, and permission of 
Department Head 

• May be repeated for credit with approval of department head. 
Individual study of an issue or problem(s) in accounting of par- 
ticular interest to the student. Student must arrange time and 
course requirements with instructor prior to registration. 



Finance Courses (FIN) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

200 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance (3:3) 
Introduction to problems and methods in business finance within 
the context of entrepreneurial ventures. Topics include business 
formation, sources of financing, financial statements, business 
valuation, budgeting, and measuring financial performance. 
(Same as ENT 200) 

300 The Management of Personal Finance (3:3) 

Personal budgeting and accounting; borrowing money; buying 
on credit; personal income tax returns; saving and wise invest- 
ment of savings; insurance; home ownership. 

315 Business Finance I (3:3) 

Pr. ACC 202, 201 or 218, ECO 201, 202 
Recognition and analysis of financial problems. Integrated 
approach to financial management emphasizing basic concepts 
of valuation, investment, and financial structure. 

320 Principles of Risk Management and Insurance (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in FIN 315; junior standing; admission to 
a program of study in the Bryan School or other professional 
program approved by the School 
Investigation of risk and the risk management process includ- 
ing the role of insurance. Social insurance, financial planning 
issues, employee benefits and pension and retirement planning 
are included. 

325 Fundamentals of Real Estate (3:3) 

Pr. grade of Cor better in FIN 315; junior standing; admission to 
a program of study in the Bryan School or other professional 
program approved by the School 
Examination of principles, practices, and policies affecting real 
estate markets. Topics include the nature of real property, mort- 
gages, real estate financing, and real property law. 

330 Financial Institutions and Markets (3:3) 

Pr. grade of Cor better in FIN 315; admission to a program of study 
in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by 
the School 
Principal institutions and markets comprising the financial sys- 
tem; their roles in short-term, long-term and equity financing, 
interest rate determination and capital formation. Interrelation- 
ships between domestic and international and financial markets. 
Government policy objectives and regulations as influences on 
the financial system. 

335 Entrepreneurial Finance (3:3) 

Pr. FIN 315 
This course focuses on financial analysis, financial forecasting, 
financing, capital costs, and working capital management of 
start-up businesses and existing businesses in the early stages of 
development. (Fall) (Same as ENT 335) 

360 Internship in Finance (3:0:20) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in FIN 315; admission to the Finance 
program; permission of internship coordinator 
Provides students with an opportunity to apply finance knowl- 
edge in a business environment and to gain a better understand- 
ing of the finance profession. (Fall & Spring & Summer) 



IK) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Accounting & Finance 



410 Business Finance II (3:3) 

Pr. grades ofC or better in ACC 201 or 218; ECO 250; and FIN 
315; admission to approved program 
Theory and practical application of capital budgeting, cost of cap- 
ital and capital structure analysis, working capital management, 
and financial analysis and planning. 

415 Advanced Corporate Finance (3:3) 

Pr. FIN 410; admission to a program of study in the Bryan School 
or other professional program approved by the School 
An examination of the interrelationships between major financial 
policy decisions. Topics include capital structure theory, corpo- 
rate debt capacity, risk and capital budgeting, dividend policy, 
corporate restructuring, and mergers and acquisitions. 

420 Real Estate Finance (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in FIN 315; admission to a program of study 
in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by 
the School 
Working knowledge of real estate finance. Topics include mort- 
gage markets and institutions, methods and practices of real 
estate finance, and real estate appraisal and investment analysis. 

430 Real Estate Investment (3:3) 

Pr. grade of Cor better in FIN 315; admission to a program of study 
in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by 
the School 
Introduction to the foundations and practices in real estate 
investment. The principal emphasis is on real estate investment 
principles and concepts, the investment environment, financial 
analysis and practical applications. 

442 Investments (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in FIN 410; admission to approved program 
Investment principles and practices, investment policies, security 
analysis, and the mechanics and mathematics of security pur- 
chases. Long- and short-term fluctuations of security prices, func- 
tions of securities markets and regulatory bodies, and individual 
investment needs. 

444 International Finance (3:3) 

Pr. grades ofC or better in ACC 218 and FIN 315; admission to 
approved program 
Examination of international finance from standpoint of the firm. 
Topics include interna rional money and capital markets, foreign 
exchange markets, investments in foreign operations, as well as 
financing strategies for foreign operations. 

449 Seminar in Finance (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in FIN 410; admission to approved program 
Independent study, research, and class discussion covering a 
topic or group of related topics of current interest in financial 
theory, policy, or practice. Topics may vary each semester. 

450 Derivatives (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in FIN 410; admission to approved program 
Investigation of risk and the financial risk management process 
including portfolio insurance. Topics include options, futures, 
hedging, decision trees, and sensitivity analysis. (Formerly FIN 
350) 

471 Life Insurance and Financial Planning (3:3) 

Pr. FIN 320; admission to a program of study in the Bryan School 
or other professional program approved by the School 
Emphasis on life insurance in the financial planning process. 
Explores the role of savings and investment and the creation, 
preservation, and taxation of wealth. 



472 Property and Liability Insurance (3:3) 

Pr. FIN 320; admission to a program of study in the Bryan School 
or other professional program approved by the School 
Examination of coverages and exclusions found in direct damage 
and indirect loss contracts and liability insurance contracts as risk 
management devices for the treatment of pure risk. 

473 Risk Management (3:3) 

Pr. FIN 315; admission to a program of study in the Bryan School 
or other professional program approved by the School 
Identification and evaluation of risk with emphasis on risk treat- 
ment. Attention given to risk financing, including cash-flow 
plans. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

499 Problems in Finance (3:3) 

Pr. senior majors; permission of Department Head; grade ofC or 
better in FIN 315 

• May be repeated for credit with approval of department head. 
Independent study, research, and class discussion covering a 
topic or group of related topics of current interest in theory or 
policy of finance. Topics may vary from semester to semester. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for graduate-level courses. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



111 



African American Studies 



African American Studies Program 

College of Arts & Sciences 

200 Foust Building 

336/334-5507 " 

www.uncg.edu/afs 

Committee Members 

Tara T. Green, Associate Professor and Director, African American 

Studies Program 
Shelly L. Brown-Jeffy, Department of Sociology 
Michael Cauthen, Lecturer, African American Studies Program 
Carlina de la Cova, Department of Anthropology 
George Dimock, Department of Art 
Sally Ann H. Ferguson, Department of English 
William D. Hart, Department of Religious Studies 
Colleen Kriger, Department of History 
Frank Woods, Visiting Assistant Professor, African American 

Studies Program 

Mission Statement 

The African American Studies Program is committed to sustaining 
an academic environment in which African American students and 
students of every race or ethnicity are motivated to develop to their 
full potential. Through interdisciplinary courses, the students can 
achieve an informed appreciation of the history and socioculture of 
persons of African descent, as well as the history and socioculture of 
others. Set in an urban institutional environment, the Program offers 
students an array of scholastic and experiential opportunities. The 
Program contributes to the social, aesthetic, and ethical development 
of its students and supports them as they pursue their academic goals. 
African American Studies nurtures intellectual curiosity, tolerance, 
and commitment to the ideals of social justice and equality, attributes 
prized by the University community and society at large. 

African American Studies Major (AFST) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U803 

The African American Studies major gives students an 
integrated and critical understanding of the experiences and 
contributions of peoples of African descent in the Americas. 
African American Studies also provides students with the 
opportunity to examine experiences of African Americans 
using theories and methods from a wide range of disciplines. 

African American Studies students will be able to apply 
these theories and methods to better understand the social, 
political, and economic problems facing African Americans. 
They will also gain an enhanced recognition of the enduring 
strengths and heroic accomplishments that underlie the black 
presence in the New World. In addition, students graduat- 
ing with the major will be well prepared for leadership in the 
African American community, in particular, and American 
society in general. The African American Studies Program 
is committed to offering an academically challenging cur- 
riculum coupled with a solid foundation of liberal arts educa- 
tion. 



Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Student may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one additional 
GRD course 
Department specifies courses for: 

One additional GLT course (student may select) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

required: AFS 201 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

required: AFS 210 and one other GSB course 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

one GHP/GPM course 
Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 



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Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 
a total of four WI courses 

IV Major and Related Area Requirements 

Minimum 30 semester hours to include the following: 
Core Courses (15 semester hours) 

1. AFS 201*, 210*, 410 

2. ENG 374 or 376 

3. HIS 301 or 302 or 389 

Additional AFS and Related Area Courses (15 semes- 
ter hours) 

Students should select an additional 15 hours from 
the following courses: 

AFS 200, 305, 310, 320, 400; ART 102; DCE 232, 332; 

ATY 325; ENG 204, 315; HIS 203, 204, 306, 399, 502, 

524, 581; MUS 214; PHI 121; PSC 391; REL 229; SOC 

222, 227, 425; WGS 333 
*AFS 201 satisfies GHP and CAR GMO; AFS 210 satisfies one 
GSB requirement 

V Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

African American Studies as a Second Major 

Students who wish to declare a second major in Afri- 
can American Studies must complete all requirements listed 
above under the degree selected. 

African American Studies Minor 
Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

AFS 201 and 210 are required for all AFS minors. Stu- 
dents may select the additional 12 hours required for the 
minor from any courses listed in 'Additional AFS and Related 
Area Courses." 

African American Studies Courses (AFS) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

200 African American Art History (3:3) 

The development of African American art placed within the con- 
text of mainstream American art and the history of the blacks in 
this country. 

201 Introduction to African American Studies (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

Introduction to African American culture through a historical 
and social perspective. (Fall & Spring & Summer) 

210 Blacks in American Society: Social, Economic, and 
Political Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GSB 
Social, political, economic experience of blacks in the United 
States. Topics include the black family Civil Rights Movement, 
black politicians, and blacks in the labor market. (Fall & Spring 
& Summer) 



305 Special Topics in African American Studies (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

An in-depth study of a selected topic or topics in African Ameri- 
can Studies involving directed reading and research. (Fall & 
Spring & Summer) 

310 The Portrayal of African Americans in Film (3:3) 

An examination of African American him roles as a reflector of 
America's perception of black character and behavior. Various 
film genres will be considered for insight into movie portrayals 
as social commentary. (Spring) 

312 Experimental Course: Minorities and Music: Race, 
Class, and Gender in America (3:3) 

Offers a critical perspective on representations of race, class, and 
gender in American popular music and uses music to examine 
and understand the impact of dominant ideologies. (Offered 
spring '08) (Same as SOC 312) 

315 Theories and Paradigms in African American Studies 
(3:3) 

Pr. AFS 201 and 210, junior or senior standing, or permission of 
instructor 
A concentrated examination of the theories or systematic expla- 
nations of the social, cultural, and historical phenomena and/or 
experiences of African Americans. (Fall & Spring) 

320 The African American Athlete (3:3) 
An examination of the lives and careers of African American ath- 
letes and their struggles to gain acceptance in both competitive 
and social settings. (Fall or Spring) 

325 Black Women in the U.S. (3:3) 

• AFS 201 and 210 recommended. 

Explores the historical experiences of women of African descent 
in America through an evaluation of relevant literature, film, and/ 
or music. (Fall or Spring) 

330 Black Music as Cultural History: 1960-1980 (3:3) 

African-American urban music from the 1960s and 1970s as cul- 
tural history and as a reflector of social, political, and economic 
movements of the era. (Fall) 

350 Experimental Course: The History, Literary 
Connections, and Social Relevance of Hip-Hop (3:3) 

Explores history of the hip-hop movement, hip-hop as a genre 
of literature, and the social context, relevance, and effect of both 
grassroots and mainstream hip-hop. (Offered spring '08) 

370 Experimental Course: Postmodern Blackness (3:3) 
Reviews various frameworks for viewing black identity and 
explores multiple and competing expressions of "blackness" 
based on media representations, social class, sexual orientation, 
political affiliation, and educational attainment. (Offered spring 
'08) 

390 Experimental Course: The Black Body (3:3) 

This course will explore ways the black body has been used and 
characterized by Anglo culture and ways black people redefine 
their bodies. (Offered spring '08) 

400 Independent Study (1-3) 

Pr. permission of Director of African American Studies and faculty 
mentor. 
Intensive independent study on special topics related to the Afri- 
can American experience. (Fall & Spring & Summer) 



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410 Seminar in African American Studies (3:3) 

Pr. completion of 12 s.h. ofAFS core requirements (AFS 201, 210, 
ENG 374 or 376, HIS 301 or 302 or 389); junior or senior status; 
and permission of instructor 
Capstone seminar on issues in African American Studies and their 
significance to American society and the world. (Fall & Spring) 

492 Internship in African American Studies (1-6:0:3-16) 

Pr. AFS 201, 210; ENG 374 or 376; HIS 301, 302, or 389 
Pr.for AFS minors: AFS 201, 210, and two AFS-related courses 

• Interns must show 40 on-site hours each semester for each s.h. of 
credit sought. 

Practical experience at sites serving populations of people of 
African descent. Two semester meetings with Program director. 
Students must complete 8 to 15 hours per week at site. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 



Department of Anthropology 

College of Arts & Sciences 

426 Graham Building 

336/334-5132 

www.uncg.edu/ant 

Faculty 

Arthur D. Murphy, Professor and Head of Department 

Professor Mount joy 

Associate Professor Andreatta 

Assistant Professors de la Cova, Paluzzi, Wagner 

Lecturers Cohen-Jones, Davis, Gunn, Hartley, Stine 

Anthropology is a broad discipline which includes physi- 
cal anthropology — the study of humans as biological animals; 
cultural anthropology— the study of humankind in a cultural 
perspective; archaeology — the recovery and interpretation of 
ancient human biological and cultural remains; and linguis- 
tics—the study of language in culture and society. 

The general undergraduate major provides for extensive 
study in cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and 
physical anthropology. Majors who develop a particular inter- 
est in one of the subdisciplines may pursue a concentration 
in that area up to a maximum of 60 semester hours. Majors 
have opportunities to develop mentoring relationships with 
members of the faculty on current research projects as well 
as fieldwork projects. Internships in various agencies are also 
available. 

Anthropology as a major prepares individuals to pur- 
sue many avenues of career development. It is the basis for 
a career as a professional anthropologist. Anthropology com- 
bined with other courses of study as double majors enhances 
career possibilities and professional development. There are, 
however, increasing opportunities for anthropologists to 
work in government agencies and business. In such settings, 
the knowledge which they have may be applied to the solu- 
tion of human problems. 



Through the accelerated master's program, an anthropol- 
ogy major may earn both a master's degree in a related field 
and a bachelor's degree in anthropology in approximately 
five years. Majors must begin planning early in this program 
as well as obtaining careful advising. Opportunities exist for 
an M.A. in Economics and a Master of Business Administra- 
tion. 



Anthropology Major (ANTH) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U101 

The General Anthropology Major provides training in 
human biological, social and behavioral science within the 
broader framework of a liberal arts education. The program 
presents a holistic view of the nature of humans in society, 
past and present, through courses in linguistics, prehistory, 
physical anthropology, and cultural anthropology. It provides 
a solid foundation for both a basic liberal arts education as 
well as for one of the concentrations in anthropology. 

Student Learning Goals 

Upon completion of the program, Anthropology majors 
will be able to: demonstrate a broad knowledge of cultural 
diversity, ethnocentrism, and cultural relativity; analyze the 
social, political, and religious structure of diverse societies; 
distinguish Old, New, and Post-Processual Archaeology, 
including the ability to recover and analyze artifacts from 
archaeological sites; demonstrate knowledge of the mecha- 
nisms of biological evolution and analyze fossil evidence for 
such; analyze phonemes, parts of speech, and the basic phrase 
structure of languages. 

Program Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Student may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Department specifies courses for: 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

ATY 253 and one other GNS course with a 
different departmental prefix 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

ATY 213 and one other GSB course 

(see III for additional GSB requirement) 



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II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Humanities and Fine Arts 3 

one additional Literature (GLT) course 
Natural Sciences 3-^ 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

Minimum 34 semester hours in anthropology above the 
100-level to include the following: 

Core Courses 

1. ATY 213*, 253*, 258, 411, 595 

2. Methods -One of the following: ATY 360, 476, or 553 

3. Five additional ATY courses at the 300 level or above 
Although not a requirement beyond the 34 hours mini- 
mum, majors may choose to take additional courses in gen- 
eral anthropology or the additional courses may be in one of 
the subdisciplines: Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology, or 
Physical Anthropology. 

Majors in consultation with a faculty member in the sub- 
discipline will select the appropriate courses. 
*ATY 213 satisfies one GSB; ATY 253 satisfies one GNS 

V Related Area Requirements 

Majors who follow a plan for one of the accelerated mas- 
ter's programs should satisfy the related area requirements 
for that program. 



VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

Honors in Anthropology 
Requirements 

For Honors requirements, check with the departmental 
office and see Honors Programs information in this chapter. 

Anthropology as a Second Major 

Students who wish to declare a second major in Anthro- 
pology must complete all requirements listed above under 
the degree selected. 

Anthropology as a Second Academic 

Concentration for Elementary Education 

Majors 

Required: 18 semester hours 

1. Required (9 s.h.): ATY 213, 253, 258 

2. One methods course (3 s.h.): ATY 360 or 476 or 553 

3. One elective at the 300 level (3 s.h.) 

4. One elective at the 400 or 500 level (3 s.h.) 

Anthropology Minor 

Required: minimum of 15 semester hours 

All minors are required to take ATY 212. In addition, they 
must select a minimum of 12 hours at the 200 level or above. 
The following suggested course sequences may be of interest 
to students pursuing specific majors and with certain career 
objectives. 

1. General Anthropology -ATY 213, 253, 360, 387, 411 

2. Ethnology /Ethnography — especially useful for majors 
in social studies, history, geography, economics, and 
international studies. Courses recommended include 
ATY 213, 325, 330, 333, 335, 337, 371, 465, and 476. 

3. Linguistics — especially useful for majors in language 
arts, a foreign language, English, deaf education, speech 
pathology, social studies, and international studies. 
Courses recommended include ATY 385, 387, 585, and 
587. 

4. Archaeology— especially useful for majors in classical 
studies, geography, and environmental studies. Courses 
recommended include ATY 253, 258, 360, 362, 370, 533, 
and 553. 

5. Physical Anthropology— especially useful for majors in 
archaeology, biology, chemistry, nutrition, and psychol- 
ogy. Courses recommended include ATY 253, 331, 359, 
553, 555, and 559. 

Students in consultation with a member of the depart- 
ment may plan a minor to enhance their career objectives as 
they choose. They may also take approved independent study 
courses or approved selected topics courses. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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Anthropology 



Anthropology with Licensure in Social Studies 
High School Teaching 
AOSCode: U102 

Students majoring in anthropology may seek Standard 
Professional I teacher licensure in comprehensive social 
studies with an endorsement in anthropology. Completion 
of licensure requirements will allow majors to teach Social 
Studies as well as anthropology in secondary school. Please 
see Teacher Education Programs for complete requirements. 
Many of the requirements for licensure satisfy liberal educa- 
tion requirements in the college as well as for the major and 
the Social Studies requirements. Majors who wish to pursue 
the Standard Professional I License in social studies should 
consult with the departmental Social Studies committee rep- 
resentative. 

Accelerated Master's Programs for 
Anthropology Majors 

Interested students should see Accelerated Master's 
Programs for Undergraduates for details about the B.A. in 
Anthropology /M.B.A. or M.A. in Economics program require- 
ments. 

Anthropology Courses (ATY) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

100 Contemporary Non-Western Cultures (3:3) 

GECore: GSB GE Marker: GN 

Survey of contemporary non-Western societies which emphasizes 
their distinctive cultural characteristics and how these relate to 
changes taking place in the world today. 

212 General Anthropology (3:3) 

GECore: GSB GE Marker: GN 

• Open to freshmen. 
Survey of general anthropology. Includes an inquiry into human 
origins, prehistory and comparative study of culture. 

213 Cultural Anthropology (3:3) 

GE Core: GSB GE Marker: GN 

Cultural anthropology attempts to stimulate interest in basic 
questions about human nature and human adaptation, including 
major theoretical approaches, the nature of field work, and an 
examination of selected topics. 

253 Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GLS 

Coreq. ATY 2531 
Lecture covering human biology from an evolutionary perspec- 
tive. Topics include evolutionary theory, human variation, non- 
human primates, the fossil record, human osteology, molecular 
and population genetics. (Fall & Spring) 

253L Introduction to Physical Anthropology Laboratory 
(1:0:3) 

Coreq. ATY 253 
Laboratory covering human biology from an evolutionary per- 
spective. Topics include evolutionary theory, human variation, 
nonhuman primates, the fossil record, human osteology, molecu- 
lar and population genetics. (Fall & Spring) 



258 World Prehistory (3:3) 

GECore: GSB GE Marker: GN 

Development of culture from its Paleolithic beginnings through 
the rise of early civilizations. 

300 The Culture of Baseball (3:3) 

GE Marker: GE 
Ritual, superstition, racism, language, immigration: the history 
and culture of baseball provides a familiar lens to examine and 
contexrualize sociocultural experience. Incorporates experience 
from baseball in the U.S., Caribbean, Mexico, and Japan. (Alt 
Fall) 

305 Experimental Course: The Forensics of Sherlock 

Holmes and Bones (3:3) 

Examines the forensic methods of Sherlock Holmes and Bones 

within the context of modern forensic science. (Offered spring 

'10) 

310 Brave New Worlds: Biotechnology and Society (3:3) 

Examines the interface between science and society, focusing on 
the sociopolitical import of emerging biotechnologies that impact 
people's lives — from issues of health and family to immigration 
and criminal justice. (Alt Fall) 

311 Reading Culture and Society (3:3) 

Examines key sociocultural issues through classic literary and 
cinematic works, emphasizing notions of modernity, the con- 
temporary world, and the relationship they entertain; provides 
foundational reading and critical thinking skills. (Fall) (Same 
asSOC311) 

315 Experimental Course: World Ethnographies (3:3) 

Examines the primary genre and practice of cultural anthro- 
pology—ethnography—through a range of geographically and 
thematically diverse texts. (Offered spring '09) 

325 Caribbean Societies and Cultures (3:3) 

GE Marker: GE 
Types of social systems and cultural patterns in the West Indies 
arising from relations between Europeans, West Africans, and 
Asians, with implications for development, social change, and 
identity. 

330 Cultures of North American Indians (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Traditional ways of life of indigenous people of North America. 

331 Human Variation (3:3) 

Physical differences within and between human populations: 
their source and effect. 

333 Latin American Societies and Cultures (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Tribal and peasant groups with special emphasis on their place in 
contemporary Latin America. 

335 Cultures of Africa (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Study of the peoples of Africa emphasizing family organiza- 
tion, religion, political organization, languages, and urbanism. 
Includes a study of African novelists. 

337 Cultures of the Pacific (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Ethnographic study of Pacific cultures, focusing on language, 
physical characteristics, psychology, and culture contact. 

340 Ancient North America (3:3) 

A survey of the archaeological evidence of North American 
Indian culture, from earliest time to first European contact. (Alt 
Years) 



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342 Experimental Course: Human Growth and 
Development (3:3) 

Examines the bio-cultural perspective on human growth and 
development and the interaction between genes and the environ- 
ment, from conception to adulthood, that produce the human 
phenotype. (Offered fall '07) 

355 Medicine, Disease, and Slavery (3:3) 

An interdisciplinary examination of the health of enslaved Afri- 
can Americans drawing from anthropology, history, biology, and 
medicine to comprehend how the interaction of environment, 
culture, and diet impacted Southern slaves. (Alt Fall) 

357 Monkeys, Apes, and Humans (3:3) 

An overview of primatology — the study of prosimians, monkeys, 
apes, and humans. Involves in-depth study of selected primates 
as well as discussion of major theoretical issues and ways in 
which the study of nonhuman primate behavior helps illuminate 
human evolutionary history. 

359 Forensic Anthropology (4:3:3) 

Pr. 253 or an introductory course in biology or chemistry 

Coreq. ATY 3591 
Methods of recovery and analysis of human remains in medicole- 
gal contexts, including human and nonhuman skeletal material, 
decomposition, crime scene recovery, and skeletal signs of age, 
sex, and trauma. (Spring) 

360 Method and Theory in Modern Archaeology (3:3) 

Analysis and evaluation of methods, theories, and concepts nec- 
essary for recovery and interpretation of cultural information 
about past societies relevant for anthropological goals. Includes 
issues of historiography, epistemology, and ethics. 

370 Introduction to Historical Archaeology (3:3) 
Basic introduction to historical archaeology method and theory. 
Historical archaeology is a multidisciplinary subfield of Anthro- 
pology covering the historic past through the present. (Alt 
Spring) 

378 Historical Archaeology Field Techniques (3:0:6) 

Archaeological excavation of historic period sites. Techniques of 
excavation, recording, surveying, and artifact analysis. 

385 Language and Culture (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
A survey of verbal and nonverbal behavior cross-culturally 
Emphasis on the use of language in the speech community, ges- 
tures, body languages, expressive behavior, verbal art, and lan- 
guage learning. 

387 Modern Linguistics (3:3) 

Systematic investigation of the general properties of language, the 
universal properties found in all languages, and the specific prop- 
erties of the grammars of individual languages. Includes linguistic 
differences found in selected dialects of American English. 

411 History of Anthropological Theory (3:3) 

• Not open to freshmen and sophomores. 
Developments in history of Western thought and study of culture 
leading to the emergence of anthropology as a scientific field. 

425 Experimental Course: The Beginning and the End: The 
Anthropology of Early Childhood and Old Age (3:3) 

Pr. ATY 212 or 213 or permission of instructor 
An examination of the culturally mediated experiences at the 
opposite ends of the human life span that includes cultural 
behaviors, traditions, beliefs, and intersections with relevant 
global health issues. (Offered spring '09) 



440 Experimental Course: Archaeological Perspectives on 
Migration and Diaspora (3:3) 

Exploration of the effects of voluntary and forced migration in 
North America and portions of the Caribbean using archaeologi- 
cal evidence and interpretation. (Offered fall '08) 

440 Archaeological Perspectives on Migration and Diaspora 
(3:3) 

Exploration of the effects of voluntary and forced migration in 
North America and portions of the Caribbean using archaeologi- 
cal evidence and interpretation. (Alt Fall) 

442 Evolutionary Medicine (3:3) 

Pr. ATY 253 or BIO 105 or BIO 111 
Explores the evolution of chronic and infectious disease using an 
ecosystemic approach. Discusses theory involving host/pathogen 
"arms race," evolution of virulence, modes of transmission, and 
the discordance hypothesis. 

450 Anthropology in the Environment: Culture, 
Environment, and Adaptation (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing and higher 
Through an anthropological lens this course examines various 
theoretical approaches to culture and the environment. Issues of 
social justice, cultural preservation, and natural resource access 
will be addressed through case studies. (Alt Spring) 

462 Archaeology of the Southeastern United States (3:3) 

Investigation of Indian cultural development in the U. S. from 
the Mississippi River Basin to the Atlantic Coast, from earliest 
evidence to the European Contact Period, with special emphasis 
on the context of the East in the archaeology of North America 
and North Carolina. 

465 An Overview of Medical Anthropology (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

• Not open to freshmen and sophomores. 
Explores multiple causes of disease and cultural variation in 
health practices. Topics include culture and political ecologies of 
disease, ethnomedical systems, and healers in cross-cultural per- 
pectives. (Alt Fall) 

476 Methods in Data Collection and Analysis in Cultural 
Anthropology (3:3) 

Review and discussion of major methodological principles and 
techniques used in anthropology. (Alt Spring) 

478 Field Methods in Archaeology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Methods, techniques, and theories of archaeological field investi- 
gation. Includes site survey, mapping, systematic sampling, and 
controlled excavation. 

479 Analysis of Archaeological Data (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Instruction on proper treatment of material recovered through 
archaeological investigation. Includes classification, statistical 
manipulation of data, seriation, and analysis of spatial and tem- 
poral dimensions. Attention to special analytical techniques (e.g., 
C14 dating, chemical analysis, faunal analysis) with stress on eco- 
logical interpretation. 

480 Ethnographic Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology 
(4:3:6) 

Pr. 476 or permission of instructor 
Course applies qualitative research techniques (fieldnotes, par- 
ticipant and casual observations, interviews, data interpretation), 
and statistical techniques that supplement ethnographic descrip- 
tion and analysis at field sites. (Alt Summer) 



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481 Study Abroad Experience for Anthropology Majors (3) 

Pr. 213, 253, 258, and two ATY courses at the 300 level or above, or 
permission of faculty member with whom student wishes to work 
This course offers majors the opportunity to broaden their expe- 
rience by studying anthropology in another country. Cross-cul- 
tural exchanges are designed to augment UNCG training. (Fall 
& Spring & Summer) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

497, 498 Special Problems in Anthropology (1-3), (1-3) 

Pr. permission of faculty member with whom student wishes to work 
Opportunity for students to have directed instruction on prob- 
lems of special interest. 

499 Internship in Anthropology (3:1:6-12) 

Pr. written permission required; junior status; appropriate 

prerequisite courses in the relevant anthropology subfield selected 
for internship: Cultural— ATY 213; Physical— ATY 253; 
Archaeology -ATY 360; Linguistics -ATY 387. 
Faculty supervised practicum experience in an off campus set- 
ting. Host organization will provide the student with applied 
experience directly relevant to a specific subfield of anthropol- 
ogy. (Fall & Spring & Summer) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

501, 502 Selected Topics in Anthropology (3:3), (3:3) 

Pr. anthropology major or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

Opportunity for advanced students to study in depth topic or 
issue of special interest. 

510 Archaeology of South America (3:3) 

Pr. junior or senior Anthropology or Archaeology majors, or 
permission of instructor 
Survey of the archaeology of South America from earliest evi- 
dence of human habitation up to the arrival of the Spanish. 
Emphasis placed on the Andean area of western South America. 

520 Economic Anthropology (3:3) 

Pr. 212, 213, or 3 s.h. of social science 
An analysis of the economic organization of tribal and peas- 
ant peoples with special attention given to their participation 
in a world economy; emphasis is on economic models of social 
change. 

523 Applied Archaeology: Shovel Bums to Managers (3:3) 

Pr. ATY 360 or 370 or permission of instructor 
Overview of theory and skills needed to work as an applied 
archaeologist in the public sector. Topics include cultural resource 
management and public outreach projects. (Alt Spring) 

524 Applied Anthropology (3:3) 

Pr. junior or senior standing 
Application of anthropological method and theory in situations 
of directed sociocultural change. 

526 Anthropological Perspectives on Food and Agriculture 
(3:3) 

Examines the linkages among food producers, marketing strate- 
gies, and natural resource use in different cultures, and explores 
the influence of agriculture on society and the environment. (Alt 
Spring) 



533 Archaeology of Mexico (3:3) 

Pr. junior or senior standing in Anthropology or Archaeology, or 
permission of instructor 
Major prehispanic cultural developments in Mexico with empha- 
sis on internal cultural change (from early man to rise of great 
civilizations such as Aztec and Maya) and relationships with 
adjacent areas. 

547 Myth, Magic, and Religion (3:3) 

Examination of sacred and secular beliefs in cross-cultural per- 
spective. Emphasis on symbols, ritual, and their functions. 

553 Human Osteology: Description, Data Collection, and 
Analysis (3:2:3) 

Pr. 253 or 3 s.h. of biological science 
Detailed coverage of anatomical structures on bone and methods 
involving inventory, description, data collection, and analysis of 
human remains. Topics include functional and comparative skel- 
etal anatomy, bone microstructure, and physiology. 

555 Human Evolution (3:3) 

Pr. 253 or 3 s.h. of biological science 
Biological and cultural evolution of humans from prehuman 
forms. 

557 Primate Behavior (3:3) 

Pr. 253 or permission of instructor 
An overview of primatology and of methods for studying the 
behavior of prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Involves experience 
in data collection, computerized data analysis, and producing a 
scientific report. 

559 Disease and Nutrition in Ancient Populations (3:3) 

Pr. 253 or NTR 213 or 3 s.h. of biological science 
Evaluation of past disease and nutritional status using skeletal 
remains and other tissues. Topics include differential diagnosis of 
pathology. Analysis of mummified material, and chemical meth- 
ods of dietary reconstruction. 

576 Culture and Personality (3:3) 

Cross-cultural analysis of effect and influence of culture and 
group membership on development of personality. 

578 Research Methods in Historical Archaeology (3:3) 

Pr. junior, senior, or graduate status 
Advanced training in research methods in Historic Archaeology, 
involving on-site training in field, laboratory, and library compo- 
nents of Historic Archaeology. (Same as IAR 578 and HIS 578) 

583 Culture and Society (3:3) 

• Not open for credit to anthropology majors 

• May not be taken for credit by students who have prior credit for 
ATY 213 

Concepts of culture and society and their employment in under- 
standing human behavior in a cross-cultural context. 

585 Social Dialects (3:3) 

Consideration of differences in social dialects (speech patterns) 
among males and females, social classes, regions, and eth- 
nic groups. Includes attitudes about social dialects, models for 
describing social dialect differences, and consequences of social 
dialects. 
587 Foundations of Linguistic Theory (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor. 
An in depth study of modern linguistic theory and its histori- 
cal antecedents. An extensive background in a language related 
discipline is required. Application of linguistic theory will be 
included. 



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589 Experimental Course: Political Violence and Its 
Aftermath (3:3) 

Examines violent conflict, its causes and effects, as well as 
attempts to rebuild post-conflict societies, focusing on the lived 
experiences from examples such as the Holocaust, Rwanda, and 
former Yugoslavia. (Offered fall '09) 

595 Contemporary Issues in Anthropology (3:3) 

Pr. senior status and anthropology major, or permission of 
instructor 
A capstone seminar focusing on current issues in various sub- 
fields of anthropology, how they relate to the discipline, and their 
significance to anthropology's role in the modern world. 

597, 598 Special Problems in Anthropology (3), (3) 

Pr. permission of faculty member with whom student wishes to work 
Opportunity for advanced students to undertake independent 
study or research of special interest. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 
for additional graduate-level courses. 



Apparel Product Design 

(see Consumer, Apparel, and Retail 
Studies) 



Archaeology Program 

College of Arts & Sciences 

1104 Moore Humanities and Research Administration 

336/334-5590 

www.uncg.edu/arc 

Committee Members 

Jeffrey S. Soles, Chair, Archaeology Program, Department of 

Classical Studies 
Maura K. Heyn, Department of Classical Studies 
Joseph B. Mountjoy, Department of Anthropology 
Jeffrey C. Patton, Department of Geography 
P. Daniel Royall, Department of Geography 
Roy Stine, Department of Geography 
Linda Stine, Department of Anthropology 

The Special Programs in Liberal Studies major with a 
concentration in Archaeology introduces students to the 
ancient civilizations and cultures of the Old and New Worlds 
and to the analytical tools that facilitate their study. The 
major is designed to develop both anthropological and his- 
torical perspectives in archaeological research, to encompass 
the range of prehistoric to early historic cultures in the Old 
and New Worlds, and to introduce the theoretical concepts 
and methodological techniques appropriate to archaeological 
research. 



The Program's faculty are actively involved in field work 
in Greece, Mexico, and North Carolina, and students are 
expected to participate in those or other field work projects. 

Special Programs in Liberal Studies Major — 
Concentration in Archaeology (SPLS) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U808 



Program Requirements 



I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

required: CCI 211 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

Required: ATY 258, CCI 211 and 212, and one additional 
GL/GN course selected by student 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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Archaeology 



III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Humanities and Fine Arts 3 

one additional Literature (GLT) course 
Natural Sciences 3^1 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

Minimum 30 semester hours distributed as follows: 

1. Core Requirements (12 semester hours) 
ATY 258* World Prehistory 

ATY 360 Modern Archaeology 

CCI 211* Introduction to Classical Archaeology (Greece) 
CCI 212* Introduction to Classical Archaeology (Rome) 
* ATY 258 satisfies GN marker requirement; CCI 211 satisfies 
GHP; CCI 211 and 212 satisfy part of GL marker requirement. 

2. Area Requirements [six (6) semester hours with three 
(3) hours from each category] 

Old World Archaeology: 

CCI 312* The Art and Archaeology of Egypt 

CCI 313 Archaeology of the Aegean 

CCI 314 Ancient Cities 
New World Archaeology: 

ATY 462 Archaeology of the Southeastern 
United States 

ATY 510 Archaeology of South America 

ATY 533 Archaeology of Mexico 
*CCI 312 carries GN Marker credit. 

3. Analytical Methods and Techniques (6 semester hours 
with no more than 3 hours from ATY 378, ATY 478, 
CCI 401) 

ATY 378/578 Historical Archaeology Field Techniques 
ATY 478 Field Methods in Archaeology 
ATY 479 Analysis of Archaeological Data 
ATY 553 Human Osteology: Description, Data Collec- 
tion, and Analysis 
ATY 559 Disease and Nutrition in Ancient Populations 
CCI 401 Archaeological Practicum 
GEO 314/314L* Physical Geography: Landscape 

Processes 
GEO 359 Remote Sensing 
*GEO 314/314L carries GNS Core credit and CAR GPS credit. 

4. Related Area Electives (6 semester hours from any of 
the above courses or the following related courses) 
ART 201 Ancient Art 



ART 281 Ceramics I 

ART 285 Photography I 

ATY 213 Cultural Anthropology 

ATY 340 Ancient North America 

ATY 501 Selected Topics in Anthropology (if in 

Archaeology) 
CCI 360 Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Britain 

and Gaul 
CCI 365 Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Asia 

Minor and Syria 
CCI 450 Internship in Classical Studies 
CCI 475 Archaeology of Death in the Classical World 
GEO 357 Principles of Cartography 
HIS 220 The Ancient World 

PHI 325 Introduction to the Philosophy of Science 
Under special circumstances and with the permission of 
the Committee, some required courses may be substituted for 
others. 

V Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

Archaeology Minor 

Required: minimum of 15 semester hours 

The Archaeology minor requires completion of a mini- 
mum of 15 hours with nine (9) hours chosen from the Core 
Requirements and three (3) hours chosen from each category 
of the Area Requirements. 



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Art 



Department of Art 

College of Arts & Sciences 

1 38 Gatewood Studio Arts Center 

336/334-5248 

e-mail: artdept@uncg.edu 

www.uncg.edu/art 

http://digital.uncg.edu 

Faculty 

Pat Wasserboehr, Associate Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Aichele, Goldstein, Lee, Maggio 

Associate Professors Ananian, Blair, Dimock, Dunnill, 

Lixl-Purcell 
Assistant Professors Campbell, Cassidy, Ellis, Holian, Leal, Lim, 

Martin, Meanley, Perrill, Sobsey, Stephan, C. Thomas, 

S. Thomas, Walton 
Lecturers Ellis, Gantt 
Adjunct Faculty Doll, Eden, Grimaldi 

The Department of Art offers the following degree 
programs: 
B.F.A. art major, concentrations in art education I & II, 

design, painting, and sculpture 
B.A. art major, concentrations in art history/museum 

studies and studio art 

The department believes that at the undergraduate level 
students are best served by a liberal university education with 
a specialization in art. Specialized degree programs empha- 
size the traditional disciplines of painting, sculpture, design, 
art history, and art education. Students seeking vocational 
specializations should pursue relevant post-baccalaureate 
studies. 

All transfer students should make an appointment 
with Pat Wasserboehr for a transcript and portfolio review 
to approve transfer studio art and art history transfer credit. 
Director of Undergraduate Advising advises all art majors 
and minors throughout the year. 

Courses in drawing, painting, and sculpture in the 20s, 
30s, and 50s series emphasize working from dual approaches 
of observation and abstraction. Still life, landscapes, interior 
environments, and the human figure are the primary sources 
of study from which students work toward developing basic 
observational skills. Students focus on conceptual approaches 
as they incorporate research, skill, interpretation, and inven- 
tion into abstract forms of art making. Courses in the design 
concentration include digital imagery, ceramics, photogra- 
phy, color theory, and crafts. Courses in the 40s, 70s, and 80 
to 84 series focus on the inherent systemic logic, or functional 
aspects of art. 

The department provides a thorough background in art 
history and museum studies through introductory courses 
and subsequent graduated offerings that extend focus, range, 
and depth. 



The art education program offers courses in studio art 
and art history to majors while preparing them in theoreti- 
cal and philosophical foundations as well as curriculum and 
teaching methods. Students gain the expertise necessary for 
teaching in a variety of settings. 

Students in all concentrations in the department also avail 
themselves to courses that allow for the advanced pursuit of 
relevant topics in studio art, art history, museum studies, art 
education seminars, independent study, internships, practi- 
cums, and student teaching experiences. The faculty includes 
studio artists, art educators, and art historians of acclaimed 
accomplishments in their areas of specialization. 

The Weatherspoon Art Museum and the Department 
of Art each sponsor a program of exhibitions, lectures, and 
workshops that enhances the educational goals of the art cur- 
riculum. 

The department's studio and art education facilities are 
located in the Maud F. Gatewood Studio Arts Building on 
Highland Avenue. Art historians have offices located in the 
Weatherspoon Art Museum. 

Art Major (ART) 

Degree: Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Required: 128 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Design (including Ceramics & Photography), U1 1 1 

Painting (including Drawing & Printmaking), U113 

Sculpture, U115 

The B.F.A. program allows a more intense concentration 
in studio work than is available in a B.A. program. Because 
of the number of required courses, junior transfers cannot 
expect to complete a B.F.A. program in two years. 

Program Requirements 
I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

required: ART 100 or 101 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



111 



Art 



II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III Major Requirements 

Core studio courses for major concentrations may be 
closed to students who are not enrolled in a degree program 
full-time. 

Core Courses for all Concentrations 

1. ART 100* or 101* 

2. Four art history courses above 100 level 

3. Art 120, 140, 150, 220, 221 
*ART 100 or 101 satisfies GFA. 

Design Concentration 

1. ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221, 241, 285, 347, and select two 
from the following: 340, 341, 344. 

2. Design courses from those numbered in 280s, 340s, 370s, 
380s, 390s, 440s, 470s, 480s, or 490s: 12 s.h. 

3. Advanced design courses from those numbered in 440s, 
480s, 490s, 540s, or 529: 6 s.h. 

4. Art or related electives: 9 s.h. (recommended but not 
required: choose from 300 level or above) 

Painting Concentration 

1. ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221, 232, 321, 322, 335, 337, 482 

2. Printmaking: 6 s.h. 

3. Art or related electives: 9 s.h. (recommended but not 
required: choose from 300-level or above) 

Sculpture Concentration 

1. ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221, 252 or 253, 281, 322, 348, 353, 
355, 356, 481 

2. Art or related electives: 9 s.h. (recommended but not 
required: choose from 300 level or above) 

IV Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 128 semester hours 
required for the degree. 



Art Major (ART) 

Degree: Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Required: 128 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Art Education I, U107 

Art Education II, U109 

All studio art students who seek teacher licensure in 
art must take a B.F.A. under one of two concentrations: Art 
Education I offers academic breadth, Art Education II offers 
concentration in a studio discipline. Junior transfers cannot 
expect to complete these programs in two years. 

Program Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Department specifies courses for: 
Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

required: ART 100 or 101 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

required: HEA201 and PSY 121 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 



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III Major Requirements 

Art Education I (General Art) Concentration (18 
semester hours) 

1. ART 100* or 101* 

2. Four additional courses in Art History above the 100 
level 

3. ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221 

4. Painting, Design: 3 s.h. in each 

5. Crafts: 6 s.h. 

6. Art or related electives: 7 s.h. 

7. Art Education courses: 360 (junior year); 363, 365, 463 
and 465 (senior year) 

8. Concentration in one studio area (Design, Painting, or 
Sculpture) of 15 s.h. above the 100 level 

This is a summary list from the studio requirements above. 

Art Education II (Studio Art) Concentration 
(18 semester hours) 

1. Same as Art Education I, numbers 1* through 7 

2. Single studio specialization, including at least 6 s.h. of 
independent studio in this specialty: 15 s.h. 

TJiis is a summary list from the studio requirements above. 
*ART 100 or 101 satisfies GFA. 

IV Related Area Requirements 

(See Teachers Academy for full explanation.) 

1. GEC requirements as identified within each major 

2. TED or LIS 120: Introduction to Instructional 
Technology for Educational Settings 

3. HEA 201* Personal Health 

4. ELC 381 The Institution of Education 

5. TED 450 Psychological Foundations of Education 

6. TED 470 Reading Education 
*HEA 201 satisfies GSB. 

V Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 128 semester hours 
required for the degree. 

VI Admission to Student Teaching: 

During the junior year students must apply for student 
teaching. Art Education methods courses 363 and 365 are pre- 
requisites to student teaching and are taken in the fall semes- 
ter of the senior year. Student Teaching 463 and 465 are taken 
in the spring semester. 

Admission requirements for Teacher Education include 
the following: 

1. Medical clearance 

2. Grade point average of at least 2.70 

3. Passing scores on Praxis I exam, unless scores are 
waived (SAT 1100; ACT 24) 

4. ART 360, Foundations of Art Education, which 
includes pre-student-teaching practicum 

5. Evidence of skills, knowledge, dispositions, and 
competencies as set and evaluated by the depart- 
ment 



Art Major (ART) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Art History and Museum Studies, U104 

Studio Art, U105 

The Art History and Museum Studies concentration is for 
those students wishing to pursue careers either in art scholar- 
ship or the museum and gallery profession. Those thinking 
primarily of Art History are encouraged to study the foreign 
languages needed for scholarship, particularly French and 
German. 

The Studio Concentration combines a liberal arts educa- 
tion with the development of studio skills. 

Program Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

required: ART 100 or 101 
One additional GLT course (student may select) 3 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 
Students may select courses for: 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 
One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



123 



Art 



One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 

programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

Art History/Museum Studies Concentration 

Minimum 36 semester hours in art 

1. ART 100* or 101* and three (3) courses chosen from: 
ART 201, 202, 203, 204 

2. 6-7 s.h. of studio art, including one of the following: 
ART 120, 140 or 150, and one 200-level studio course 

3. At least 12 s.h. of 300-level art history course work 
selected from: ART 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 
308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 400, 493, 500, 501 

4. ART 590 to be taken in the spring of the junior year 

5. At least one of the following: ART 393, 400**, or 401 

6. For the purpose of program evaluation, all Art majors 
with a concentration in Art History and Museum Stud- 
ies are required to take a comprehensive examination in 
the first or second semester of the senior year. 

*ART 100 or 101 satisfies GFA. 

**Students enrolled in ART 400 should be encouraged to consider 
presenting a paper at the Mint Museum Undergraduate Art 
History Symposium. 

Studio Art Concentration 

Minimum 33 semester hours in art 

1. ART 100* or 101* 

2. Two courses from ART 120, 140, 150 

3. Art History above the 100 level: 12 s.h. 

4. Studio Art above the 100 level: 15 s.h. (recommended 
but not required: choose from 300-level or above) 

5. Enrollment in independent study courses (optional for 
qualified students) 

*ART 100 or 101 satisfies GFA. 

V Related Area Requirements 

No specific courses required. 

VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for the degree. 



Honors in Art 
Requirements 

A minimum of twelve semester hours from the following: 

• 3 s.h. of HSS 490 Senior Honors Project 

• 3 s.h. of any Art Honors course above the 100 level 

• Any 500-level Art course 

• ART 493 (Independent Study) 

• Any ART Honors contract course 

Qualifications 

• A grade of A or B in all course work used to satisfy the 
Honors requirements in Art 

• A declared Art Major 

• At least a 3.30 overall GPA at graduation 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in 
Art" and the title of the Senior Honors Project will be printed 
on the student's official transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

See Pat Wasserboehr for further information and guid- 
ance about Honors in Art. 

Art as a Second Major 

Students who wish to declare a second major in art must 
complete all requirements listed above under the degree 
(B.F.A. or B.A.) and concentration selected. 

Art as a Second Academic Concentration for 
Elementary Education Majors 
Required: 18 semester hours 
Art History Focus 

1. Required core courses (9 s.h.): ART 367 and either ART 
100 or 101 and either 120 or 140 

2. One studio course chosen from those for which ART 120 
or 140 are prerequisites 

3. Two additional art history courses at the 300 and/or 400 
level 

Studio Art Focus 

1. Required core courses (12 s.h.): Art 100 or 101, 120 or 
140, 232, 367 

2. One studio course from those for which ART 120 or 140 
are prerequisites 

3. One additional art history course at the 300 or 400 level 

Art Minor 

Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

An Art Minor requires 18 semester hours of studio and/or 
art history courses. A Minor in Art History requires 3 hours in 
ART 100 or 101 and 15 additional hours of 200-level or above 
art history courses. A Minor in Studio Art requires 3 hours in 
ART 100 or 101 and core studio courses ART 120, 140, 150, 
220, 221. 



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Art Courses (ART) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Art courses are listed under the following headings: Studio, 
Art History, Art Education, and Museum Studies. 



STUDIO Courses 



Courses for Undergraduates 

120 Fundamentals of Drawing (3:1:6) 

Basic course in the practice and principles of drawing. Emphasis 
on working from observation with a wide variety of media and 
genres explored. (Fall & Spring) 

140 Design I (3:1:6) 

Basic course in fundamentals of design. Work in two and three 
dimensions. (Fall & Spring) 

150 3-D Foundations (3:1:6) 

Fundamentals in three dimensional concepts of form, space, and 
structure. (Fall & Spring) 

220 Intermediate Drawing (3:1:6) 

Pr. 120 
A continuation of the practices and principles of ART 120, with a 
greater emphasis on conceptual development. (Fall & Spring) 

221 Life Drawing I (3:1:6) 

Pr. 220 
Figure drawing from the model. (Fall & Spring) 

226 Woodcut and Wood Engraving (3:1:6) 

Pr. 120 or 140 
Woodblock relief techniques as a printmaking medium. (Occ) 

228 Etching I (3:1:6) 

Pr. 120 or 140 
Intaglio techniques as a printmaking medium. (Fall & Spring) 

229 Lithography I (3:1:6) 

Pr. 120 or 140 
Planographic techniques as a printmaking medium. (Fall & 
Spring) 

231 Materials of Painting (3:1:6) 

Pr. 120 
Materials and characteristic processes of major techniques. 

232 Painting I (3:1:6) 

Pr. 120 
Basic course which uses observation as a vehicle for learning the 
fundamentals of oil painting. 

241 Design II (3:2:3) 

Pr. 140 
Introduction to the computer as a design tool and art medium. A 
variety of imaging applications introduced through design stu- 
dio problems and visual problem solving. 

252 Techniques of Sculpture (3:1:6) 

Pr. 150 

Tools, materials, and characteristic processes of major tech- 
niques. 

253 Sculpture I (3:1:6) 

Pr. 150 
Working from observation, students will increase their percep- 
tual ability and skills through studio assignments. Emphasis on 
the comprehension of forms and structures in space. 



275 Metal Crafts I (3:1:4) 

Pr. 140 or 150 
Techniques required to make jewelry and small art objects from 
copper, brass, and precious metals. Includes gem and stone set- 
ting. 

281 Ceramics I (3:1:6) 

Basic course with emphasis on handbuilt forms. (Fall & Spring) 
285 Photography I (3:1:6) 

Pr. 140, or permission of instructor 
Equipment and basic techniques of photography. Students must 
purchase film and papers. 35 MM camera required. (Fall & 
Spring) 

321 Life Drawing II (3:1:6) 

Pr. 221 

• May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor and 
department head. 

Continuation of 221. (Fall & Spring) 

322 Variable Topics in Drawing (3:1:6) 

Pr. 221 
Practice and study of traditional and contemporary methods of 
drawing in a variety of media and genres. 

323 The Arts as Human Experience (3:3) 

An examination of the meaning of the arts experience, includ- 
ing its historical and personal significance. Includes reading and 
related work in art, dance, drama, and music. (Same as DCE 323, 
THR 323) 

335 Painting II (3:1:6) 

Pr. 232 
Studio course with substantial work from the model. Emphasis 
on development of control of the medium for pictorial purposes. 

337 Painting III (3:1:6) 

Pr. 335 
Studio course with work from the model and other subject mat- 
ter; emphasis on control of pictorial elements and individual 
development. 

340 Concepts in Time-based Media (3:2:3) 

Pr. 140 and 241 
Intermediate-level study of design fundamentals in time-based 
applications, with emphasis on cross application work and con- 
tent. (Fall & Spring) 

341 Letters, Signs, and Symbols (3:2:4) 

Pr. 140 and 241 
Letter forms, signs, and symbols as configurations for design 
study. 

344 Digital Darkroom (3:2:4) 

Pr. 140, 241, or permission of instructor 

• 285 recommended. 

Studio based study of photo-based imagery and digital imaging. 
In-depth study of Photoshop and complementary photo-based 
software. (Alt) 

345 Introduction to Web Design (3:2:3) 

Pr. ART 241 
An introduction to the design on interfaces for the Web using 
HTML and CSS. The course also addresses the issues of fluid 
design in interactive media. (Fall) 

346 Kinetic Design (3:2:3) 

Pr. 10 s.h. of studio art including 140 
Motion and time sequence in two-dimensional and three-dimen- 
sional design. 



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347 Color Theory (3:1:6) 

Pr. 140 
Major color theories and systems. Projects using properties of 
color in pigments, transparencies, and projected light. (Fall & 
Spring) 

348 Metal Sculpture (3:1:6) 

Pr. 252 or 253 
Studio course in non-cast metal sculpture techniques and con- 
cepts. Basic welding and fabrication of metal as a sculpture 
medium. 

353 Metal Casting (3:1:6) 

Pr. 252 or 253 or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Basic course in casting metal as a sculpture medium. Theory and 
practice of moldmaking and foundry processes. 

355 Sculpture II (3:1:6) 

Pr. 252 or 253 
Sculpture as a plastic idiom in creating forms in space. Emphasis 
on the development of individual expression. 

356 Sculpture III (3:1:6) 

Pr. 355 
Advanced undergraduate work with emphasis on individual 
sculpture development. 

373 Design Methods for the Crafts (3:1:6) 

Pr. 100 or 101, 140, or permission of instructor 
Sources of and approaches to crafts design with materials such as 
wood, fiber, metal, and paper. Exploration of sources of design in 
natural and man-made worlds. Recommended for Art Education 
majors. 
375 Metal Crafts II (3:1:4) 

Pr. 275 
Advanced work in techniques required to make jewelry and 
small art objects from copper, brass, and precious metals. 

381 Ceramics II (3:1:6) 

Pr. 281 or permission of instructor 
Wheel-thrown forms; glazing and decorating techniques. (Fall 
& Spring) 

382 Ceramic Glaze Techniques (3:1:6) 

Pr. 281 
Glaze formulae; mixing and testing of glazes, glaze application, 
the care and operation of equipment. (Spring) 

384 Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (3:1:2) 

Pr. 285 or permission of instructor 
Course examines photojournalism and the documentary tradi- 
tion. Students will explore a local story idea while learning new 
technical and visual skills essential to creating a cohesive visual 
narrative. (Fall) 

385 Photography II (3:1:6) 

Pr. 285 or portfolio and permission of instructor 
Special techniques including those used in research laboratories; 
work with special types of film. Students must purchase films 
and papers. 

387 Color Photography (3:1:5) 

Pr. 285 
An introduction to the basic processes used to produce color pho- 
tographs and to an understanding of color photography as art. 



388 Photographic Interaction (3:3) 

Pr. 285 or permission of instructor 
Course expands the boundaries of image-making in still life, 
nature and human relationships. Includes advanced techniques 
in printing and sequencing images, including digital technology. 

389 Experimental Course: Digital Integration in 
Printmaking (3:1:6) 

Experimental integration and application of traditional and digi- 
tal printmaking processes. (Offered fall '08) 

393 Practicum/Internship in Art Careers (1-3) 

Pr. prior written approval of supervising instructor and department 
head, with written agreement of expectations from sponsor 

• May he repeated for credit. 

Practical experience for art majors for developing career goals 
and skills. 

428 Etching II (3:1:6) 

Pr. 228 

• May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor or 
department head. 

Continued development of etching techniques introduced in 
Etching I. Emphasis placed on supervised independent work 
consistent with students' personal artistic goals. (Fall & Spring) 

429 Lithography II (3:1:6) 

Pr. 120 or 140, and 229 

• May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor or 
department head. 

Continuation of ART 229 with additional emphasis on multi-color 
imagery and the integration of advanced lithographic processes 
in students' assignments. 

439 Variable Topics in Painting (3:1:6) 

Pr. 120, 220, 232, 335 
Practice and study of traditional and contemporary methods of 
painting in a variety of media and genres. 

441 Books and Images (3:2:3) 

Pr. 140, 241, and 341 

• For advanced students. 

Advanced studio investigation into digital publishing with an 
emphasis on print-based and electronic publication forms. Pri- 
mary focus on unique and challenging artist's books and image- 
intensive works. (Alt Years) 

442 Image Sequencing/Sequential Images (3:2:3) 
Pr. 140, 241, and 340 

• For advanced Design majors. 

Advanced studio-based exploration of digital video, sound, and 
animation through a range of digital software. Study of nonlin- 
ear editing, narrative, and experimental approaches to motion 
graphics and video. (Alt Years) 

445 Three-Dimensional Design (3:2:3) 
Pr. 140, 241, 340 

Three-dimensional modeling and animation. Development of 
three-dimensional systems as objects and environments. (For- 
merly ART 345) 

446 Graphic Design (3:2:3) 

Pr. 140, 241, and 341 

• For advanced students. 

An advanced investigation into graphic design; typography, 
branding, and information architecture. Advanced execution of 
print, Web-based, and motion graphics. (Alt Years) 



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Art 



481 Ceramics III (3:1:6) 

Pr. 281, 381 
Advanced course in ceramics with emphasis on the entire ceramic 
process: preparation of clay body and glazes, forming, bisque 
and glaze firing. (Fall) 

482 Capstone Painting Studio and Practice Seminar (3:1:6) 

Pr. ART 120, 220, 221, 232, 321, 322, 335, and 337 
Through independent studio, discipline-based writing, and 
speaking projects, students will engage in analytical discourse 
related to museum exhibitions and lectures and in preparation to 
exhibit, present, and document their artwork. (Spring) 

485 Advanced Critique in Photography (3:3:6) 

Pr. ART 285 and two photography courses at the 300 level 
Emphasis upon the application of advanced tools and tech- 
niques, where independent research and creative studio practice 
is required. (Spring) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

496 Special Problems, Studio (3:1:6) 

Pr. prior approval of supervising instructor required 

• May be repeated for credit with permission of department head. 

• May not be used in place of a required course in the Art major. 
Independent studio work adjusted to needs and interests of indi- 
vidual student. (Fall & Spring) 

498, 499 Independent Study (3:1:6), (3:1:6) 

Pr. senior status and permission of instructor 
Students complete work demonstrating technical accomplish- 
ment and self-motivation. 498: sequence of work must be submit- 
ted for juried senior show. 499: sessions on portfolio presentation 
and preparation. (Fall & Spring) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

520 Anatomy for the Artist (3:1:6) 

Pr. 220 or permission of instructor 
Visual analysis of the human form with an emphasis on the skel- 
eto-muscular system. 

525 Advanced Metal Casting (3:1:6) 

Pr. 353 or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 
Advanced theory and practice of metal casting. 

529 The Multi-Media Print (3:1:6) 

Pr. 226 or 228 or 229, and 241 

• May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor. 
Experimental forms of image making utilizing diverse sources 
of technical and aesthetic references including electronic media, 
photography, monoprints, collagraphy, 3-D constructions, and 
traditional printmaking methods and processes. (Fall & Spring) 
540 Digital Visualization and Methods (3:2:3) 

Pr. ART 241 and 340, 341 or 344, senior status or MFA status, or 
permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit once, with permission of instructor. 
Studio investigation of the ways that digital methods expand and 
change the visual vocabulary and methods. Emphasis on refin- 
ing personal artistic vision and establishing connections between 
traditional and digital methods. 



545 Interactive Web Design (3:2:3) 

Pr. 241, 345, or permission of instructor 
Development of Web graphics and interactive Web-based envi- 
ronments that demonstrate an understanding of navigation, 
usability, and functionality within a creative framework. (Fall) 

550 Sculpture/Installation (3:1:6) 

Pr. 355, 356, 481, or permission of instructor 
Investigation of the sculptural possibilities of a space through art 
making, conceptual development, and personal research with a 
focus on contemporary and historical issues. (Occ) 

557 Site-Specific Sculpture (3:1:6) 

Pr. 355, or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Provides opportunity to make site-specific sculptures; process of 
making work in the public arena from initial conception, interac- 
tion with jury committee to completed sculpture. (Spring) 

592 Professional Practices, Aesthetics, and Preparation for 
the Visual Artist (3:3) 

Pr. graduate students: full time graduate status; undergraduates: 
completion of 50 s.h. toward studio major, or permission of 
instructor. 

• May be repeated once for credit. 

Emerging artists participate in their community and acquire 
the skills of career professionals. Students will engage in criti- 
cal dialog related to gallery lectures, exhibitions, and symposia, 
and prepare to exhibit, present, and document their studio work. 
(Fall & Spring) 



ART HISTORY Courses 



Courses for Undergraduates 

100 Introduction to Art (3:3) 
GECore: GFA 

Intensive study of selected works of art with an emphasis on for- 
mal analysis and the relationship between art and culture. (Fall 
& Spring) 

101 Survey of Western Art (3:3) 

GECore: GFA 
Major artists and periods starting with the ancient world through 
current times. (Fall & Spring) 

102 The Black Atlantic: Cross-Cultural Representations 
(3:3) 

Course interprets visual constructions from the African, African 
American, and European traditions as they relate to the history of 
slavery and the colonization of the New World. 

103 Survey of Visual Art in Non-Western Traditions (3:3) 

GECore: GFA GE Marker: GN 

A survey of the visual arts in India, China, Japan, Mesoamerica, 
Africa, and/or the South Pacific. (Fall) 

200 History of Western Architecture (3:3) 

Architecture in Europe and the U.S.A. from ancient Greece to the 
present. 

201 Ancient Art (3:3) 

Art and architecture of Ancient Greece and Rome from the Bronze 
Age through AD. 337. 

202 Medieval Art (3:3) 

Art and architecture of Europe from Early Christian times 
through the late Gothic period ca. A.D. 1400. 



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Art 



203 Renaissance through Rococo (3:3) 

Visual arts of Europe during the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, 
and Rococo periods. (Fall) 

204 Modern Art (3:3) 

Visual arts in the West from ca. 1790 to the present. (Spring) 
210 The Art of Disney (3:3) 

Chronological survey of the preproduction and production art of 
the Disney and Pixar studios with an introduction to the history 
of the animated film and cartoon. (Fall or Spring) 

300 Greek Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100 or 101 or 201 
Architecture, sculpture, and vase painting from ca. 1000 B.C. to 
the end of the Hellenistic period. 

301 Early Medieval Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100 or 101 or 202 
Early medieval art of the Mediterranean World from ca. A.D. 300 
to 1066 including Early Christian, Celtic, Carolingian, and Early 
Islamic periods. 

302 Romanesque Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100 or 101 or 202 
Romanesque Art throughout Europe from ca. A.D. 1050 to ca. 
1180: architecture, sculpture, manuscript illumination, and 
mural painting. 

303 Gothic Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100 or 101 or 202 
Art in Europe from ca. 1160 to ca. 1400: architecture, sculpture, 
manuscript illumination, and mural painting. 

304 Italian Renaissance Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100, or 101 and 203, or permission of instructor 
Art in Italy from ca. 1300 to ca. 1600; painting, sculpture, archi- 
tecture. (Fall) 

305 Northern Renaissance Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100 or 101 or 203 
Art in Europe north of the Alps from ca. 1400 to ca. 1560. Painting 
and graphic arts emphasized. 

306 Baroque Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100, or 101 and 203, or permission of instructor 
Seventeenth-century art in Europe: painting, sculpture, architec- 
ture, and landscape architecture. (Spring) 

307 European Art in the Eighteenth Century (3:3) 

Pr. 100, or 101 and 203, or permission of instructor 
A survey of European art media, practice, theory, and issues sur- 
rounding patronage during the century. 

308 European Art in the Nineteenth Century (3:3) 

Pr. 100, or 101 and 204, or permission of instructor 
Painting, sculpture, and architecture from 1800 to 1900. 

309 Architecture in the Twentieth Century (3:3) 

Pr. 100 or 101 or 200 
The components of style, theory, structure, and material as 
embodied in the architecture of the century. 

310 American Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100 or 101 
Historical development of art in the United States including the 
colonial period. Painting and architecture emphasized. 

311 Early Twentieth-Century Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100, or 101 and 204, or permission of instructor 
Painting, sculpture, architecture, and other media from 1900 to 
World War II. 



312 Late Twentieth-Century Art (3:3) 

Pr. 100, or 101 and 204, or permission of instructor 
Traditional and new media in the last half of the century. 

313 History of Photography (3:3) 

Pr. 100 or 101 or permission of instructor 
A lecture course in the exploration of the photographic image, 
how it was produced, how it has evolved, and the work of the 
photographers who make it an art. 

314 African Art (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
African art as one of the great and original world art traditions. 
Attention will be placed on concepts with stress on the religious 
and social functions of art. (Spring) 

315 History of Printmaking to Digital Imaging (3:3) 

Pr. ART 100 or 101 
A concise history of printmaking by Diirer, Rembrandt, Callot, 
Goya, Daumier, and others. Attention will focus on basic prin- 
ciples and how they relate to digital imaging. (Alt) 

400 Special Problems, Art History and Criticism (3:3) 

Pr. 15 s.h. of art history and criticism and approval of instructor 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 
Directed program of reading and research. 

402 Experimental Course: Art and Urbanization: From 
World's Fair to Biennale (3:3) 

Pr. ART 100, 101, 102, or 103, or permission of instructor 
Focusing on world's fairs, private salons, biennales, and life on 
the street, this course delves into the history of global art worlds: 
London to Havana, Sao Paolo to Shanghai. (Offered spring '09) 

403 Art History Research Seminar (3:3) 

Pr. completion of nine (9) s.h. in art history or permission of 
instructor 
Research seminar with discussions, oral and written presenta- 
tions, and lectures on topics selected by participating students. 
Students gain subject knowledge, standard research methods, 
and presentation skills within the discipline. 

405 Research Topics in Art History and Museum Studies 
(3:3) 

Pr. 12 s.h. of art history above the 100 level or permission of 
instructor 
Topic-based seminar in art history and museum studies. Students 
acquire knowledge of current research on the selected topic, 
undertake related independent research, present findings in oral 
and written forms. (Fall or Spring) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

500 Traditions of Art Criticism (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing or graduate status 
A study of the major critical traditions from the Italian Renais- 
sance to the present, aiming to define the role of criticism in the 
production and reception of works of art. 

501 Topics in the History of Art (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing or graduate status 

• May be repeated when topic varies. 

Special topics in the history of art, ancient to modern. 



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2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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502 Historiography and Methodology (3:3) 

Pr. graduate status in the Art Department, completion of 15 or more 
undergraduate s.h. in art history, or written permission of the 
instructor 
Case studies in the development of art history as a discipline and 
applied practice of methodologies developed for art-historical 
analysis. (Fall) 



MUSEUM STUDIES Courses 



Courses for Undergraduates 

401 Special Problems: Museum Studies (3:3) 

Pr. 15 s.h. art history! criticism and approval of instructor 
• May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 
Directed program of reading, research, or curatorial projects in 
the Weatherspoon Art Gallery and other museums. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

590 Museum Studies (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing and permission of instructor 
A study of the diverse operations and institutional missions of 
art museums, including management, governance, development, 
collections management, education, and curatorial activities. 



ART EDUCATION Courses 



Courses for Undergraduates 

360 Foundations of Art Education I (3:2:1) 

Pr. junior standing 
An introduction to the art theoretical and philosophical foun- 
dations for Art Education K-12. A field placement practicum in 
schools or other appropriate settings is included. A prerequisite 
for student teaching. 

361 Foundations of Art Education II (3:2:4) 

Pr. ART 360; art education major; junior standing or permission of 
instructor 
Art media and curriculum foundation for Art Education K-12. 
Field placement practicum in schools or other appropriate set- 
tings. (Spring) 

363 Curriculum and Teaching Methods in the Elementary 
School (3:2:2) 

Pr. 360 and admission to Teacher Education or permission of the Art 
Education Coordinator 

• For art education majors only. 

Aims and philosophy of art education in elementary school. Spe- 
cial section for art majors only offered in the fall. (Counts as Art 
credit.) 

365 Curriculum and Teaching Methods in the Secondary 
School (3:2:2) 

Pr. 360 and admission to Teacher Education or permission of the Art 
Education Coordinator 
Aims, philosophy, and curricula of art education in the second- 
ary school; selection, preparation, and use of teaching materials. 
(Counts as Art credit.) 

367 Child Art and Teaching (3:2:2) 

Pr. junior standing 

• Not open to Art Education majors. 

An introduction to the theoretical and philosophical foundations 
for Art Education (birth to middle school), including hands-on 
experience with school art media. 



463 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6:1:10) 

Pr. senior standing or permission of the Coordinator of Art Education 
Supervised student teaching at the elementary school level. 

465 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6:1:10) 

Pr. senior standing or permission of the Coordinator of Art Education 
Supervised student teaching at the secondary school level. 

468 Teaching Practice and Curriculum in Art (3:1:4) 

Pr. admission to the "SP-1 " licensure only program for Art K-12 
and/or permission of the instructor 

• Enrollment restricted to "SP-1 " licensure only students 
Curriculum development for K-12 art teaching, professional the- 
ory, development, standards and guides for effective teaching, 
and observations of student's classroom practice. (Spring) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

563 Trends and Teaching in Art: Special Populations (3:2:1) 

Pr. completion of 363, student teaching, or equivalent or permission 
of instructor 
Curricular and instructional principles, processes and designs 
applicable to special populations in various school, institutional, 
or community settings. 

565 Issues in Art Education (3:3) 

Pr. graduate status or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated once for credit when topics vary. 
Exploration of issues in art or education which affect the teaching 
of art. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



Astronomy 
(see Physics & Astronomy) 



Biochemistry 
(see Chemistry and Biochemistry) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



129 



Biology 



Department of Biology 

College of Arts & Sciences 

312 Eberhart Building 

336/334-5391 

www.uncg.edu/bio 

Faculty 

Stanley H. Faeth, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Cannon, Henrich, Hershey, Lacey, Leise, O'Brien, 

Rublee, Stavn, Sullivan 
Associate Professors Adamson, Hens, Kalcounis-Riippell, Katula, 

Kirchoff, Lajeunesse, Lepri, Patel, Remington, Rueppell, 

Schug, Steimle, Tomkiel 
Lecturers Bundy, Gouzoules, Green, Horton, Lamb, Loreth, 

Maxwell, Pelli, Powell, Rushforth, Sealy, Somers, Tomlin, 

Zaliand 
Adjunct Faculty 

Adjunct Professors Johnston, Logan, Mcintosh 
Adjunct Clinical Professor Lipford 
Adjunct Associate Professors Blake, Pratap 
Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor Hopkins 
Adjunct Assistant Professor Curtis 
Adjunct Clinical Instructors Anderson, Bean, Culton, Gaither, 

Hobson, Scaro, Shirley, Simmons, Yarborough 

The Department of Biology has a strong commitment 
to teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. 
Recipients of undergraduate biology degrees find employ- 
ment in a wide range of fields and are well-prepared for fur- 
ther study in graduate school and in health-related profes- 
sions such as medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine. 
Writing- and speaking-intensive courses and laboratory 
classes help develop communication and research skills. 

The department's tradition of excellence in education 
is complemented by a faculty actively engaged in research 
in areas ranging from molecular biology and biochemistry 
to ecology and evolution. Students are encouraged to gain 
research experience through independent study with a fac- 
ulty mentor. 

Transfer Credit 

Credit for courses above the 100 level is transferred as 
Biology elective credit only. To establish transfer credit for 
specific Biology courses above the 100 level, students should 
contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies or Associate 
Head. Transfer students are reminded that at least 12 semes- 
ter hours in the major must be completed at UNCG. 

Biology Major (BIOL) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Biology, U117 
Environmental Biology, U122 



The Department offers a full range of courses leading to 
the B.A. degree. The degree may lead to further study in grad- 
uate school, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, medi- 
cal technology, biotechnology, and environmental biology. 
See also the descriptions of pre-professional programs, in this 
chapter, concerning their requirements. Both study and labo- 
ratory facilities are available to advanced undergraduates. 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 

One additional GLT course (student may select) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

required: MAT 151 or 191 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 7 

required: BIO 111 and CHE 111 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences (GNS/GLS) 4 

required: BIO 1 12/1 12L 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 



130 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Biology 



Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 
a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

Biology majors must complete BIO 111 and 112, and a 
minimum of 30 semester hours of Biology courses above the 
100 level. CHE 420 or 556 can be counted toward the mini- 
mum required 30 hours of Biology for the major in lieu of BIO 
535. A maximum of four hours at the 200 level may be counted 
toward the major. Students must have a grade point average 
of at least 2.0 in Biology courses completed at UNCG. 

Biology Core Courses 

In meeting this requirement for hours above the 100 level, 
all B.A. in Biology majors must complete the following core 
courses; completion of at least four of these requirements is 
strongly recommended prior to enrollment in courses num- 
bered 400 and higher. 

1. Ecology: BIO 301 

2. Cell Biology: BIO 355 

3. Genetics: BIO 392 

4. Diversity: one of the following: BIO 322, 341, 354, or 370 

5. At least two of the following core laboratory courses: 
BIO 302, 356, or 393 

V Related Area Requirements 

Biology majors are required to take the following related 
area courses or their approved equivalents: 

1. CHE 111, 112, 114, 115 

2. MAT 151 or 191 

The department highly recommends the following 
courses in addition to the required courses listed above: 

1. CHE 351, 352, 354 

2. MAT 191, 292 

3. STA 271, or 571 and 571L 

4. PHY 211, 212 

B.A. in Biology with Concentration in 
Environmental Biology 

This concentration is designed for students with a strong 
interest in environmental biology. The concentration pro- 
vides students with a breadth and depth of environmental 
awareness, rigorously prepares them for advanced studies in 
environmental biology and trains them for environmentally- 
oriented professions. 

Basic requirements beyond the Biology Core 

1. 

2. 



3. 
4. 



BIO 302 

One additional course in Biological Diversity (BIO 322, 

341, 354, or 370) 

BIO 431 

At least two of the following advanced Biology courses: 

BIO 420, 430, 522, 526, 527, 528, 529, 560, or 579 



Additional requirements 

1 . Statistics (STA 271 or 571 and 571 L) 

2. Introduction to Earth Science (GEO 103 or GEO 106) 

3. At least one of the following courses: CHE 252; GEO 
205, 303, 311, 314; PSC 312, 313; SOC 346; ECO 380 

Strongly recommended 

CHE 351, 352, 354; PHY 211, 212 or 291, 292; MAT 191 

Biology Major (BIOL) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Biology, U116 

Biotechnology, U214 

Environmental Biology, U118 

Human Biology, U863 

The Bachelor of Science degree is offered for those stu- 
dents aspiring to a professional career in biology, and for 
those students with particularly strong interests in the disci- 
pline. See also the descriptions of pre-professional programs 
concerning their requirements. A student pursuing the Bach- 
elor of Science is expected to develop a stronger background 
in mathematics and related sciences and to attain a greater 
understanding of biology than will a student pursuing a 
Bachelor of Arts degree. Bachelor of Science students will also 
be strongly encouraged to undertake an individual research 
project with a faculty member during their junior and/or 
senior year. 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 

One additional GLT course (student may select) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

required: MAT 191 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 7 

required: BIO 111 and CHE 111 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 



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Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences 4 

required: BIO 112 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

Intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

A total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

Biology majors must complete BIO 111 and 112, and a 
minimum of 30 semester hours of Biology courses above the 
100 level. CHE 420 or 556 can be counted toward the mini- 
mum required 30 hours of Biology for the major in lieu of BIO 
535. A maximum of four hours at the 200 level may be counted 
toward the major. Students must have a grade point average 
of at least 2.0 in Biology courses completed at UNCG. 

Biology Core Requirements 

In meeting this requirement for hours above the 100 level, 
all B.S. Biology majors must complete the following courses; 
completion of at least four of these requirements is strongly 
recommended prior to enrollment in courses numbered 400 
and higher. 

1. Ecology: BIO 301 

2. Cell Biology: BIO 355 

3. Genetics: BIO 392 

4. Diversity: one of the following: BIO 322, 341, 354, or 370 

5. At least two of the following laboratory core courses: 
BIO 302, 356, or 393 

6. At least one course at the 500 level 
Undergraduate Research (BIO 499) or Honors Work (BIO 

493), for 2 or more s.h., are also strongly recommended. 



V Related Area Requirements 

B.S. Biology majors are required to take the following 
related courses or their approved equivalents: 

1. CHE 111, 112, 114, 115, 351, 352, and 354 

2. MAT 191 and either MAT 292 or STA 271 (or STA 
571 and 571L) 

3. PHY 21 1, 212 or PHY 291, 292 

B.S. in Biology with Concentration in 
Biotechnology 

The concentration in biotechnology is designed for students 
with a strong interest in molecular biology and genetics. Courses 
will prepare students in both conceptual aspects of molecular 
biology and their practical application in biotechnology and 
genetic engineering. CHE 420 or 556 can be counted toward the 
required 30 semester hours of Biology needed for the major. 

Basic requirements beyond the Biology Core 

BIO 481, 494, 499 (at least 1 s.h.), BIO 535 (or CHE 420 or 
CHE 556), BIO 596 (at least 1 s.h.), BIO 597 (at least 1 s.h.) 

Strongly recommended 

BIO 424, 528, 583, 584, 595, and additional s.h. of BIO 499, 
596, and 597 

Note: Students will be expected to attend seminars covering 
biotechnology topics. 

B.S. in Biology with Concentration in 
Environmental Biology 

This concentration is designed for students with a strong 
interest in environmental biology. The concentration pro- 
vides students with a breadth and depth of environmental 
awareness, rigorously prepares them for advanced studies in 
environmental biology and trains them for environmentally- 
oriented professions. 

Basic requirements beyond the Biology Core 

1. BIO 302 

2. One additional course in Biological Diversity (BIO 322, 
341, 354, or 370) 

3. BIO 431 

4. At least two of the following advanced Biology courses: 
BIO 420, 430, 522, 526, 527, 528, 529, 560, or 579 

Related area requirements same as B.S. degree above, 
plus the following additional requirements 

1. Statistics (STA 271 or 571 and 571L) 

2. Introduction to Earth Science (GEO 103 or GEO 106) 

3. At least one of the following courses: CHE 252; ECO 
380; GEO 205, 303, 311, 314; PSC 312, 313; SOC 346 

B.S. in Biology with Concentration in Human 
Biology 

This concentration is designed for biology majors who 
want to develop the ability to integrate biological knowledge 
as it relates to human beings. The study of human biology 
requires fundamental knowledge of basic life science, since 
humans and other animals share a large number of struc- 
tural, chemical, and control mechanisms. Moreover, human 
behavior occurs within a specific evolutionary and ecological 
setting, just as it does in other animals. Full appreciation of 



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human biology, including our complex brains, our commu- 
nication and conceptual abilities, and our social structures, 
requires an understanding drawn not only from biology but 
also from basic courses in anthropology and psychology, and 
from additional academic disciplines in the humanities and 
sciences. 

Recommendation within the Biology Core 

Completion of a statistics course listed in the Related 
Area Requirements for the B.S. degree is strongly recom- 
mended (STA 271 or STA 571/571L). 

Basic requirements beyond the Biology Core 

1. BIO 277 or 271 

2. At least three of the following BIO courses: 425, 430, 
438, 453, 464, 472, 479, 481, 567, 578, 583, 584, 595 

Related area requirements same as B.S. above, plus the 
following additional requirements (12 semester hours) 

1. ATY253 

2. PSY 230 

3. Two courses in two different departments selected from 
among the following: 

ATY 331, 357, 553, 555, 559; CHE 420, 556; ESS 375; GRO 
501; HIS 311, 359; HDF 211, 212; HEA 201, 207, 260, 314, 
315, 316; NTR 213; PHI 220, 520; PSY 435, 436, 457; SOC 
101, 201, 227, 261; SES 240 

Biology Minor 

Required: minimum of 17 semester hours 

A minimum of 17 semester hours in biology is required 
for a minor in biology. A student must have at least a 2.0 GPA 
in Biology courses completed at UNCG to receive a minor in 
Biology. The following courses are required: 

1. BIO 111 and 112 

2. One course from two of the following four catego- 
ries: 

Ecology: BIO 301 

Cell Biology: BIO 355 

Genetics: BIO 392 

Diversity: BIO 322, 341, 354, or 370 

Biology as a Second Major 

Students who wish to declare a second major in Biology 
must complete all requirements listed above under the degree 
selected. 

Second Academic Concentration in Biology 

Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

The second academic concentration in Biology is designed 
specifically for Elementary Education and Physical Educa- 
tion Teacher Education students. It requires a minimum of 18 
semester hours to include: 

1. Introductory Biology 111, 111L and 112, 112L. 

2. One course from three of the following four core 
biology categories: 

Ecology: BIO 301 

Cell Biology: BIO 355 

Genetics: BIO 392 

Diversity: BIO 322, 341, 354, or 370 



3. Credit hours from Biology 271 or 277 will count 
toward completion of the 18 hour requirement, but 
these courses cannot be substituted for the Intro- 
ductory or core course requirements. 

Biology Major with High School Teaching 
Licensure 

B.A. in Biology with Standard Professional I License, 
U119 

B.S. in Biology with Standard Professional I License, 

U218 

Undergraduates seeking secondary teacher licensure 
in biology must satisfy the requirements for the B.A. or B.S. 
degree in Biology and must also complete GEO 103, MAT 
151 or 191, and PHY 205/205L or PHY 211 or PHY 291. See 
additional information in this catalog in Teacher Education 
Programs. 

Students seeking admission to the UNCG Teacher Edu- 
cation Program with a major in Biology must meet the follow- 
ing minimum requirements of the Department of Biology: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 9 s.h. in biology 
courses, with at least 6 of those hours from courses 
taken at UNCG. 

2. A grade point average of at least 2.50 for biology 
courses completed at UNCG. 

Students already admitted to the UNCG Teacher Educa- 
tion Program with a major in Biology who are seeking admis- 
sion to Student Teaching must meet the following require- 
ments of the Department of Biology: 

1. Completion of a minimum of 18 s.h. of biology 
courses, with at least 15 of those hours from courses 
taken at UNCG. 

2. A grade point average of at least 2.50 for biology 
courses completed at UNCG. 

Initial Standard Professional I License Only 

AOS Codes, see above 

Students who have an undergraduate degree and who 
are seeking the Standard Professional I License in Biology 
must complete the requirements for a B.A. or B.S. in Biology 
at UNCG with a biology grade point average of 2.50 or bet- 
ter. Course selection must be completed in consultation with 
the Head of the Department of Biology. Students who have 
already taken biology courses as part of their undergraduate 
program should contact the Head of the Department of Biol- 
ogy to determine if any of those courses can be accepted as 
meeting some of the requirements for the Standard Profes- 
sional I License in Biology at UNCG. 

Questions about the above requirements should be 
directed to the Head of the Department of Biology. 

Honors in Biology 
Requirements 

Eighteen semester hours to consist of: 

• 3 s.h. of HSS 490 Senior Honors Project 

• 3-6 s.h. of BIO 493 Honors Work (only 6 s.h. may be 
counted toward the 30 s.h. minimum in the Biology 
major) 

• One hour credit in any of the Department's journal clubs 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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Biology 



• Two (2) 500-level Biology courses (for 6-8 s.h. credit) 

• A third 500-level course in Biology or a Contract course 
in Biology at the 300 or 400 level. 

• Oral presentation of Honors Thesis to a committee of 
three Biology Faculty or public presentation of research 
at a local, regional, or national meeting is required. 

Qualifications 

• A grade of B or higher in all course work used to satisfy 
the Honors requirements in Biology 

• A declared Biology Major 

• At least a 3.30 overall GPA at graduation 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in 
Biology" and the title of the Senior Honors Project will be 
printed on the student's official transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

See Dr. Robert Cannon, Honors Liaison, for further infor- 
mation and guidance about Honors in Biology. 

Accelerated Master's Program for Biology 
Majors 

Interested students should see Accelerated Master's 
Programs for Undergraduates for details about the B.A. in 
Biology /M.S. in Chemistry program requirements. 

Biology Courses (BIO) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

105 Major Concepts of Biology (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GLS 

• For students not planning to take additional biology courses. 

• Students who have prior credit for BIO 111, 112 may not take 
BIO 105 for credit. 

Introduction to major concepts in biology. Topic sections empha- 
size specific areas including conservation biology, biotechnology, 
and current issues. Survey sections emphasize basic aspects of 
biology, including genetics, physiology and ecology. (Fall & 
Spring) 

105L Major Concepts of Biology Laboratory (1:0:2) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GLS 

Pr. or Coreq. concurrent enrollment in BIO 105 or previous credit 
for 105 

• For students not planning to take additional biology courses 

• Students who have prior credit for BIO 111, 112 may not take 
BIO 105L for credit. 

Designed to acquaint non-science majors with basic laboratory 
practices and major ideas in biology, including function of cells, 
the human body, mechanisms of heredity, ecology, and evolution. 
(Fall & Spring) 

111 Principles of Biology I (4:3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GLS 

Corea. BIO 111L 
Prerequisite for most other biology courses. Lecture and labora- 
tory cover the fundamental principles of biology including the 
molecular and cellular basis of life, genetics, and biotechnology. A 
passing grade in lecture must be achieved for successful comple- 
tion of this course. (Fall & Spring) 



112 Principles of Biology II (4:3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GLS 

Pr. grade ofC- or better in 111 

Coreq. BIO 112L 
Prerequisite for 300-level courses and above. Continuation of 
111 and includes laboratory. Fundamental principles of biology 
including botany, zoology, evolution, and ecology. A passing 
grade in lecture must be achieved for successful completion of 
this course. (Fall & Spring) 

271 Human Anatomy (4:3:3) 

Pr. a grade ofC- or better in BIO 111 
Human anatomy with study of skeletons, models, and anatomi- 
cal preparations. Includes dissection of cat. 

277 Human Physiology (4:3:3) 

Pr. a grade ofC- or better in BIO 111 and high school chemistry 
with grade ofC or better 
Human physiology with emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms. 

280 Fundamentals of Microbiology (4:3:4) 

Pr. a grade ofC- or better in BIO 111, and successful completion of 
either 271 or 277 

• Students cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 481. 
General survey of microscopic life and its impact on medicine, 
public health, and the environment. Includes laboratory work 
with bacteria, emphasizing aseptic technique. 

301 Principles of Ecology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 112 
Introduction to fundamentals of ecology. Principles relating to 
populations, communities and ecosystems. Particular emphasis 
placed on the many dimensions of interdependence within eco- 
systems. (Fall & Spring) 

302 Introductory Ecology Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 301 
Laboratory course to accompany BIO 301. Several field trips. 
(Fall & Spring) 

322 Plant Diversity (4:3:3) 

Pr. 112 

Coreq. BIO 322L 
Lecture and laboratory are introduction to the plant, fungi, and 
protista kingdoms. Emphasis is on structure, reproduction, and 
life cycles of the organisms. A passing grade in lecture must be 
achieved for successful completion of this course. (Fall) 

341 Invertebrate Zoology (4:3:3) 

Pr. BIO 112 
Major invertebrate groups with emphasis on ecology, physiology, 
evolution, and structural adaptations of representative types. 
Weekend coastal field trip required. (Spring) 

354 Plant Systematics (4:3:3) 

Pr. 112 

Coreq. BIO 354L 
Lecture and laboratory are introduction to the classification and 
evolution of vascular plants. The principles of classification and 
characteristics of selected plant families are emphasized. A pass- 
ing grade in lecture must be achieved for successful completion 
of this course. (Spring) 

355 Cell Biology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 112, and CHE 114 or equivalent 
Study of cellular organization and function. Fundamental bio- 
chemical properties, including cellular components, enzyme 
function, energetics, and metabolism studied in relation to cellu- 
lar structure, membrane function, cell movement, and cytoplas- 
mic compartments. (Fall & Spring) 



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356 Cell Biology Laboratory (1:0:3) 

Pr. BIO 112 

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 355 
Laboratory exercises to complement lecture material of 355. (Fall 
& Spring) 

361 Biology and Conservation of Sea Turtles (3:1:6) 

Pr. BIO 112 or permission of instructor 

• Travel fees involved, see instructor for details. 
Students spend 2 weeks in July/August in Tortuguero, Costa Rica 
assisting with tagging and collecting data on nesting turtles. Sem- 
inar and NC field trip in spring. (Odd) 

364 Experimental Course: Patterns in Life's Diversity (2:2) 

Pr. BIO 112 
Historical and contemporary patterns of life's diversity on earth 
and how these patterns have been generated, through time and 
space, by biotic and abiotic processes. (Offered spring '06) 

370 Vertebrate Zoology (3:2:3) 

Pr. BIO 112 
Classification, identification, and phylogeny of all classes of ver- 
tebrates, with field work. (Fall) 

392 Genetics (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 112 
Mendelism and modern trends in genetics. (Fall & Spring) 

393 Genetics Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 392 
Laboratory course to complement BIO 392. Exercises employ 
both classic genetic approaches and modern recombinant DNA 
technology. (Fall & Spring) 

420 Marine Biology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 112, and one of 301, 322, 341, 354, 355, 370, 392 
An introduction to marine organisms and their habitats; special 
attention given to adaptations necessary for marine life, physi- 
cal oceanography, and basic ecological principles; one weekend 
coastal field trip is required. (Even Spring) 

424 Plant Physiology and Biotechnology (3:2:3) 

Pr. BIO 355 
Physiological processes involved in plant growth spanning effects 
from the molecular to the environmental level. Laboratories will 
utilize biotechnological manipulations of the model plant Arabi- 
dopsis. (Spring) 

425 Biological Clocks (3:3) 

Pr. one of BIO 301, 322, 341, 354, 355, 370, 392 
Descriptive survey of behavioral and physiological rhythms in 
humans and other animals, including circadian, tidal, lunar, sea- 
sonal and circannual cycles, with ecological considerations and 
implications for human health. 

430 Biological Evolution (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 301 and 392, and one of 322, 341, 354, 370 
Survey of modern systematics and the biological mechanisms 
responsible for diversity among living forms. (Spring) 

431 The Biosphere (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 301 
A study of environmental issues in biology, specifically ecosys- 
tems, population dynamics, biodiversity and extinction. 



438 Animal Behavior (3:3) 

Pr. PSY 121 and 230, or BIO 1 12 

• Students cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 439 
or PSY 438 or 438L. 

Application of theory of evolution to the explanation of animal 
behavior. Surveys a variety of species, addressing several behav- 
ioral categories as well as issues in sociobiology and human evo- 
lution. (Same as PSY 438) 

439 Animal Behavior with Laboratory (4:3:3) 

Pr. PSY 230 and 311, or BIO 112 

• Students cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 438 
or PSY 438 or 4381. 

Application of theory of evolution to animal behavior. Includes 
laboratory and field techniques for assessing behavioral adapta- 
tions. Surveys several behavioral categories in a variety of spe- 
cies. (Alt Spring) (Same as PSY 438L) 

453 Vertebrate Morphogenesis (4:3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355 
Vertebrate development focussed on cellular and molecular mech- 
anisms of induction, differentiation, and morphogenetic pro- 
cesses that give rise to the adult body plan. Laboratory includes 
study of vertebrate embryos and adult specimens. (Fall) 

464 Developmental Biology (4:3:3) 

Pr. C (2.0) or better in BIO 355 and 392 
A survey of developmental processes in plants and animals. Top- 
ics will include fertilization, achievement of multicellularity, cell 
determination and differentiation, pattern development, and the 
genetic regulation of such processes. (Spring) 

472 Histology (4:3:4) 

Pr. BIO 355 
Microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues. Emphasis on correla- 
tion of cell and tissue functions with structures visible under the 
light and electron microscopes. (Odd Spring) 

477 Animal Physiology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355, and one of BIO 277, 341, or 370 
Physiology of invertebrates and vertebrates including metabo- 
lism, temperature regulation, respiration, blood, circulation, 
water and ion balance, excretion, and the nervous, sensory, endo- 
crine, and muscular systems. (Even Fall) 

479 Neurobiology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355 

• PHY 212 or 292 recommended. 

Survey of major integrative mechanisms used by nervous systems 
from invertebrates to humans. Synaptic transmission, sensory 
processing and activity of neural circuitry controlling behavior 
will be analyzed. (Odd Fall) 

479L Neurobiology Laboratory (1:0:2) 

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 479 

• PHY 212 recommended 

Computer-based laboratory exercises to complement BIO 479 lec- 
ture material, including intracellular and extracellular recording 
simulations. (Alt Fall) 

481 General Microbiology (4:3:4) 

Pr. BIO 301, 355, 392, or permission of instructor 
Introductory survey of microbiology, emphasizing the role of 
microorganisms in everyday life. (Fall) 



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490 Medical Technology Clinical Year (30) 

• Enrollment restricted to majors in the Medical Technology 
program who have been accepted to a clinical program and are 
completing requirements for the B.S.M.T. 

Registration and credit are structured as follows: BIO 490A (fall 
semester- 12 s.h.), BIO 490B (spring semester- 12 s.h.) and BIO 
490C (summer session — 7 s.h.). 

491 Experimental Course: Introduction to Mathematical 
Models in Biology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 112; MAT 191 or STA 271; or instructor's permission 
Exploration of research and methodology at the interface of 
mathematics and biology, with an overview of relevant fields and 
in-depth case studies. Focus will be on mathematical models in 
biology. (Offered spring '08) (Same as MAT 491) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes* 

*Only three (3) semester hours allowed in combination with BIO 
497 or 499 

494 Introduction to Biotechnology (4:3:4) 

Pr. BIO 392 and 393 
Introduction to the principles and techniques of biotechnology. 
Includes molecular cloning, DNA sequencing, and gene expres- 
sion. Explores topics such as gene amplification, gene therapy, 
and DNA fingerprinting. (Spring) 

497 Internship in Biology (1-3:0:3-9) 

Pr. minimum overall GPA of 2.80; two (2) of 301, 322, 341, 354, 
355, 370, 392 with a grade ofC or better; and permission of 
instructor 

• May be repeated for up to six (6)* semester hours with 
departmental permission. 

*Only three (3) semester hours allowed in combination with BIO 

493 or 499 
Students work at site outside University for a minimum of 45-135 
s.h. under direction of faculty and on-site supervisor. Times vary. 
Prior approval required. 

498 Biology Seminar (1:1) 

Oral reports and discussions of topics from current literature of 
biology by students, faculty and guest lecturers. 

499 Undergraduate Research (1-3) 

Pr. two from BIO 301, 322, 341, 354, 355, 370, 392 and permission 
of instructor 

• May be repeated for up to six (6)* semester hours with 
departmental permission. 

*01^ly three (3) semester hours allowed in combination with BIO 

493 or 497 
Biological research under the direction of a faculty member, 
culminating in a written report. Research will include labora- 
tory and/or field work and/or directed readings of the literature. 
Times by arrangement. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

501 Advanced Topics in Animal Ecology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Directed readings in the literature of physiological ecology, 
growth and regulation of populations, community structure, 
energy flow, mineral cycling, and other areas of current research 
interest. 



502 Advanced Topics in Animal Physiology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Study of physiological mechanisms; selected problems from cur- 
rent literature. 

503 Advanced Topics in Biochemistry (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Directed readings and reports from the biochemical literature. 
Structure and biosynthesis of macromolecules and the composi- 
tion and kinetic characteristics of biochemical pathways. 

504 Advanced Topics in Cell Biology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Advanced treatment of cell biology covering selected topics such 
as gene regulation, protein sorting, cell cycle control, apoptosis. 
The course will consist of lectures and discussion of research 
articles. 

505 Advanced Topics in Ecological Physiology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Study of a major topic in ecological physiology of animals, 
including mechanisms by which physiological processes change 
in response to environmental alterations and the ecological sig- 
nificance of those changes. 

506 Advanced Topics in Genetics (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Basic mechanisms of gene action in microbes, animals, and 
plants. 

507 Advanced Topics in Neurobiology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Directed readings on fundamental physiological principles of 
nervous system functioning. Topics may include motor pattern 
generation, sensory transduction, sensori-motor integration, neu- 
rohormonal modulation of behavior. 

509 Advanced Topics in Microbiology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Critical review of current research covering a wide range of top- 
ics including infectious diseases, bacterial physiology, marine 
microbiology, and immunology. Focus on students' interests or 
needs. 

510 Advanced Topics in Plant Ecology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Studies of special terrestrial communities or plant groups. 

511 Advanced Topics in Plant Physiology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
The physiology of growth and development in vascular plants 
treated in terms of phytohormones, nutrition, theories of trans- 
port, and environmental factors. 

512 Advanced Topics in Plant Structure and Evolution (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Study of current topics in plant structure, development, and evo- 
lution. A term paper is normally required. 

513 Advanced Topics in Reproductive Biology (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Directed readings and original research on reproductive biology, 
with emphasis on structural, regulatory, behavioral, and evolu- 
tionary aspects. 
515 Advanced Topics in Vertebrate History (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Directed/independent study of classification and phylogeny of 
particular vertebrate groups that results in a term paper. 



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520 Ecosystem Ecology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 301 
Introduction to ecosystem function, structure, and dynamics; 
basic ecosystem theories; discussions of key processes govern- 
ing energy flow and nutrient cycling; comparison of ecosystems; 
selected original literature. (Alt Spring) 

522 Landscape Ecology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 301; STA 271 recommended 

Corey. BIO 523 
Introduction to patch-corridor-matrix structure of landscapes 
and their impact on ecological processes. Discussion of land- 
scape indices, spatial heterogeneity, current issues, and general 
approaches in landscape ecology. (Fall) 

523 Landscape Ecology Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Pr. BIO 301 

Coreq. BIO 522 
Field labs to observe different landscape structures and conduct 
course projects for comprehending principles of landscape ecol- 
ogy. Students will use computer labs for GIS basics, landscape 
analyses. (Fall) 

526 Conservation Biology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 301 and 392; STA 271 recommended 
Introduction to habitat and species conservation; topics include 
genetic diversity, demographic patterns of rare species, habitat 
fragmentation, design and management of nature reserves, eco- 
logical restoration. (Even Fall) 

527 Terrestrial Plant Ecology (3:2:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Application of principles of ecology to plants and plant commu- 
nities. Experimental methods stressed in laboratory work. Two 
required weekend field trips. (Odd Fall) 

528 Microbial Ecology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 280 or 481, or permission of instructor 
Emphasis on current areas of active research with reference to 
applied problems. (Even Spring) 

529 Aquatic Ecology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 301 and CHE 114, or permission of instructor 
The study of the geology, physics, chemistry, and ecology of lakes, 
including reservoirs and streams with comparisons to the ocean. 

530 Aquatic Ecology Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Pr. BIO 301 

Coreq. BIO 529 
Practical study of water chemistry methods, lake and stream 
morphometry, identification of freshwater zooplankton, ben- 
thic invertebrates and fish, and field trips to area reservoirs and 
streams. (Fall) 

535 Metabolic Regulation in Health and Disease (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 277 and 355, or 392, or permission of instructor 
Chemical properties of major cellular compounds; biosynthe- 
sis, degradation, and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, 
nucleic acids, vitamins, and hormones; energy metabolism; enzy- 
matic catalysis. (Spring) 

536 Biology of Aging (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 301, 355, 392, or permission of instructor 
An integrative look at biological theory and mechanisms to 
explain the diversity of the aging process, including human 
implications. (Alt Fall) 



540 Genes and Signals (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355 and 392 
Investigates the regulation of gene expression in bacteria, yeast, 
and higher eukaryotes, and explores how such regulatory sys- 
tems have evolved. (Alt Spring) 

541 Entomology (3:2:3) 

Pr. BIO 301 and 341, or permission of instructor. BIO 392 
recommended. 
A theoretical and practical overview of the insect orders, selected 
topics of insect behavior, ecology, and evolution, and an intro- 
duction to human-insect interactions. (Alt Fall) 

543 Biophysics (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355; and PHY 211/212 or 291/292; and MAT 191; and 
CHE 114; or permission of instructor. 
Introduction to cellular biophysics, with emphasis on the physi- 
cal properties of membranes, including membrane transport 
mechanisms and electrical properties of membranes. (Alt Fall) 
(Same as PHY 543) 

545 General Biochemistry Laboratory (1:0:3) 

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 535 
Experimental work designed to complement lecture material of 
535. (Fall) 

549 Current Topics in Biology (1-3) 

Pr. BIO 112 and permission of instructor 
Advanced topics courses in the biological sciences. Topics vary 
with instructor. 

552 Metamorphosis (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355 and one 400-level course in Biology 
Readings, discussions, and oral presentations of current literature 
on metamorphosis in animals. Mechanisms controlling metamor- 
phosis, evolution of complex life cycles, and adaptations to dif- 
fering habitats. 

555 Vertebrate Reproduction (3:3) 

Pr. one of BIO 277, 370, 425, 453, 464, or 477 
An advanced treatment of the diversity of vertebrate reproduc- 
tive biology, with emphasis on structural, regulatory, behavioral, 
and evolutionary aspects. 

560 Symbiosis (3:3) 

Pr. three from BIO 301, 322, 341, 354, 355, 370, or 392, or 
permission of instructor 
Symbiotic interactions of living organisms from an evolutionary 
perspective. Metabolic, genetic, behavioral, and ecological adap- 
tations which allow symbioses to be formed and maintained will 
be discussed. (Odd Spring) 

567 Chemical Senses (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355, and one of the following: BIO 277, 472, 477, 479, 
PSY 435, PSY 436, or permission of instructor 
Exploration and interactive discussion of chemosensory stimuli, 
chemosensory transduction mechanisms, neural processing of 
chemosensory information, and organismal consequences of 
chemoreception. 

573 Drugs and the Brain (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355, and one of the following: 277, 477, 479, PSY 230; or 
permission of the instructor. 

• CHE 351 recommended. 
Pharmacology of major neurotransmitter systems in the brain 
and nervous system. Actions of clinically relevant drugs on these 
systems will be analyzed along with major drugs of abuse. (Alt 
Fall) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



137 



Biology 



575 Neuroanatomical Techniques (3:2:4) 

Pr. Ill and 112, and 355 and one of the following: BIO 453, 472, 
477, 479, PSY 435, or permission of instructor 
Practical experience with a variety of neuroanatomical proce- 
dures used to investigate the structural framework of nervous 
systems in invertebrate and vertebrate preparations. Students 
will learn to conduct independent projects. (Odd Spring) 

578 Hormones in Action (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 277 and 355 and 392 
Hormonal signaling in humans and other animals is examined 
using developmental, physiological, behavioral, cellular, and 
molecular perspectives, with special emphasis on the adrenal 
glands and the gonads. 

579 Environmental Physiology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 1 12, and 341 or 355 or 370, and 277 or 477 
Lectures, discussions, and student presentations on the physiol- 
ogy of animals as it is influenced by and is adapted to environ- 
mental conditions. (Odd Fall) 

583 Virology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 481 or permission of instructor 
Selected topics in virology. Emphasis upon new trends in the 
study of animal, plant, and bacterial viruses at both molecular 
and cellular levels. (Even Spring) 

584 Immunology (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 481 or permission of instructor 
Principles of immunology and serology covering both humoral 
and cellular aspects of immunobiology. Selected topics include: 
T and B cell, immunoglobulins, tolerance, hypersensitivity. (Odd 
Spring) 

586 Cell Cycle and Cancer (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355 and 392, or permission of instructor 
Molecular basis of cell division and cancer examined through lec- 
tures and discussions of primary literature. Topics include cell 
cycle control, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and cancer genet- 
ics. (Alt Spring) 

587 Epigenetics (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 355 and 392 
Study of epigenetic mechanisms involved in chromatin structure, 
DNA and histone modifications, gene expression, dosage com- 
pensation, imprinting, heterochromatin structure, stem cell dif- 
ferentiation, development, human disease, and environmental- 
gene interactions. (Alt Fall) 

589 Experimental Course: Biology of Aging (3:3) 

Pr. three BIO classes at the 300 level 
Discussion of biological causes of aging, ranging from genes to 
organisms. Includes theory, models, and processes. (Offered fall 
'07) 

591 Population Genetics and Molecular Evolution (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 392 or permission of instructor 
Application of population genetic and molecular evolutionary 
theory to the study of natural history, natural selection, genome 
variation and organization, human evolution, conservation biol- 
ogy, and forensics. (Alt Fall) 

592 Genomics (3:3) 

Pr. 392 or permission of the instructor 
An examination of genomic concepts and technologies, their 
application to understanding genome content, structure, func- 
tion, and evolution, implications for understanding fundamen- 
tal biological and health questions, and management of genomic 
data. (Alt Fall) 



593 Genetics of Complex Traits (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 392 or permission of instructor 
Theory, experimental methods, and analysis related to the genetic 
basis for variation in complex traits, including quantitative and 
threshold traits in animals and plants, and complex human dis- 
eases. (Alt Spring) 

595 Advanced Genetics (3:3) 

Pr. BIO 392 
Selected topics in genetics at an advanced level. Emphasis placed 
on comparative view of molecular mechanisms underlying ani- 
mal and plant development. (Even Spring) 

596 Molecular Biological Approaches in Research (1:1) 

Pr. BIO 392 

• May be repeated for a total of three (3) semester hours. 

Use of novel molecular approaches to address current questions 
in the life sciences will be explored by analyzing recent research 
reports and learning the principles underlying these approaches. 

597 Workshops in Biotechnology (1:0.5:3) 

Pr. BIO 494 or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit as long as letter suffix of course differs: 
workshops of a given letter may only be taken once. 

Individual, intensive four-week workshops focused on specific 
techniques in biotechnology. Provides hands-on experience 
designing and implementing a focused project utilizing current 
methods and bioinformatics. (Fall & Spring) 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level Biology courses. 



Broadcasting & Cinema 
(see Media Studies) 



138 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Business Administration 



Department of 
Business Administration 

including Business Administration, International 
Business Studies, Management, and Marketing 

Bryan School of Business & Economics 

366 Bryan Building 

336/334-5691 

www.uncg.edu/bae/badm 

Faculty 

Kevin B. Lowe, Professor and Head of Department 
Professors Buttner, Ford (Forsyth Medical Center Distinguished 
Professor of Health Care), Lucas, Miles, Muchinsky (Bryan 
Distinguished Professor of Business), Tullar, Welsh (Hayes 
Distinguished Professor of Entrepreneurship) 
Associate Professors Acauaah, Brown, Kshetri, Roehm, Williamson 
Assistant Professors Griffiths, McKinney, Reeves, Sarala 
Lecturers Beitler, Cash, Erba, Fernandes, Garrett, Hassell, 

Holderness, James, McLeod, Perry, Taras 
Visiting Assistant Professor McMillian 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Business Administration is to 
support the mission of the Bryan School, primarily through the im- 
parting of knowledge through instructional programs and secondarily 
through the creation of knowledge through basic and applied research. 
A third priority is to provide service through involvement in Univer- 
sity, professional and community activities. 

The Department of Business Administration offers three 
majors that lead to the Bachelor of Science degree: Business 
Administration, International Business Studies, and Market- 
ing. The Business Administration major is comprised of three 
concentrations: Business Studies, Entrepreneurship/Small 
Business, and Human Resources. 

Business Administration Major 

The objective of the Business Administration major is to 
provide liberally educated students with a broad exposure to 
the functional areas of business and a more comprehensive 
understanding of one of the managerial specialties through a 
choice of a concentration: 

Business Studies is most appropriate for those who want 
a broad business exposure without the need to concentrate 
specifically in only one functional area. (A student can com- 
plete the Business Studies concentration by careful planning 
of the Career Profile.) 

Entrepreneurship/Small Business focuses on special 
issues related to the organization and management of smaller 
enterprises, family-owned business, and entrepreneurship. 

Human Resources focuses on skills and knowledge 
needed by the professional human resources manager: job 
analysis, recruiting, screening, selection, training and devel- 
opment, performance appraisal, job evaluation, and salary 
administration. 



International Business Studies Major 

The International Business Studies major is distinctive 
in the Bryan School by requiring experiences and compe- 
tence in areas such as language and study abroad that are not 
required in other business programs. The need to understand 
other cultures, societies, and economies is met by requiring/ 
recommending more in liberal education and related areas 
than is required in General Education requirements for other 
business programs. 

Marketing Major 

The Marketing major is concerned with the development 
and pricing of products, selection of distribution channels, 
and promotion of products to consumers and businesses. 
This major leads to careers in sales, sales management, adver- 
tising, and retailing as well as marketing management. 

Disciplinary Honors in Business 
Administration 

The Department of Business Administration supports 
and encourages students to participate in an appropriate Hon- 
ors Program administered by the Lloyd International Honors 
College. The Lloyd College espouses that the students who 
complete the Disciplinary Honors program gain advanced 
understanding and skills in their major. Further, it is believed 
that participation in the Honors programs provides students 
with a competitive edge in applying to a graduate schools and 
those seeking employment will find that prospective employ- 
ers view participation in Honors as a good proxy for workers 
who are capable, well-trained, eager to learn, and intellectu- 
ally curious. 

Ms. Eloise McCain Hassell is the Honors Adviser for the 
Department. If, after reading this section, you still have ques- 
tions, please see Ms. Hassell, room 373, Bryan. 

Requirements 

The Honors student must take a total of 12 semester 
hours in some combination of the following: 

• Nine hours of Business Administration contract 
honors courses; HSS 310; departmental Honors 
Work in one of the independent study courses 
(BUS 493, MGT 493, or MKT 493). Instructions for 
establishing a contract honors course can be found 
this Web site: http://www.uncg.edu/hss/academics/ 
hcourses/contractcourses.html 

• Three semester hours in completing a Senior Hon- 
ors Project. A departmental Honors Work course 
is preferred or HSS 490. The Senior Honors Project 
can be viewed as similar to a master's-level research 
paper done in the student's major/concentration. All 
Projects must be supervised by a faculty member of 
the Department and whose discipline is appropri- 
ate to the topic. Thus, the student must obtain the 
agreement of a departmental faculty member who 
has an interest in the research area of the proposed 
project. The step-by step-requirements can be found 
at this Web site: 

http://www.uncg.edu/hss/academics/hcourses/ 
seniorproject.html. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



139 



Business Administration 



Qualifications 

• A declared major in the Department of Business Admin- 
istration 

• A minimum grade of B in all course work applicable to 
Disciplinary Honors in Business Administration 

• A minimum 3.30 overall GPA at graduation 

Recognition 

Students who complete the requirements for Disciplin- 
ary Honors in Business Administration receive a Certificate 
of Disciplinary Honors and have that honor, along with the 
title of their Senior Honors Project, noted on their official 
transcripts. In addition, students who complete an Honors 
Program are recognized at a banquet held at the end of the 
semester. 

Honors Advisor 

See Eloise McCain Hassell for further information and 
guidance about the program in Disciplinary Honors in Busi- 
ness Administration. 

Business Administration Major (BADM) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Business Studies, U331 
Online Business Studies, U338 
Entrepreneurship/Small Business, U337 
Human Resources, U326 

General Program Requirements 

1. Formal admission to Business Administration: 

a. Successful completion of ACC 201, 202; CST 105; 
ECO 201, 202, 250; ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 
101, ENG 102 or other approved ENG course; ISM 
110, 280; MAT 120 or 191 

b. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 

2. Grades of C or better in courses used to meet concentra- 
tion requirements 

3. 122 s.h. 

4. At least 50 percent of the business semester hours 
required for the degree must be earned at UNCG 

Additional University Admission Requirements for 
Online Business Studies concentration: 

1. Completion of thirty (30) s.h. or more of transfer- 
able college credit from a regionally accredited 
institution 

2. Minimum overall and transferable GPA of 2.0 as 
calculated by UNCG 

3. Eligible to return to last institution attended 



I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Department specifies courses for: 
One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

or foreign language XXX 203B (e.g., SPA 203B) 
or equivalent 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

MAT 120 or 191 
Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

PHI 361 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and CST 105 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

ECO 201 and 202 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers: 3-6 s.h. (1-2 
courses) of the same foreign language depending upon 
placement; 2-3 additional GL/GN courses, one of which 
must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III Major and Related Area Requirements 

1. ACC 201, 202; BUS 105A 2 ; CST 105 1 ; ECO 20T, 202 1 , 
250, 300 1 ; ENG 101 ', ENG 102 or other approved ENG 
course; FIN 315; ISM 110, 280; MAT 120 1 or 19T; MGT 
301 1 , 309 1 , 312, 330, 491; MKT 320; SCM 302 

2. Nine (9) s.h. of a foreign language; see chapter 6 for 
requirement details. 

l MAT 120 or 191 fulfills GMT; ENG 101 or CST 105 fulfill GRD; 
ECO 201 and 202 fulfill GSB; ECO 300, MGT 301, and foreign 
language fulfill 9-12 semester hours of GL/GN requirement; MGT 
309 fulfills major WI and SI requirements; CST 105 fulfills SI 
requirement outside major. 



140 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Business Administration 



2 BUS 105A is for students entering UNCG as freshmen and must 
be taken during the first two semesters of enrollment. Students are 
encouraged to take BUS 105 A during their first semester if space 
is available. 

IV Additional Concentration Requirements 

Students should select one of the concentrations listed 
below: 

Business Studies is comprised of 21 semester hours 
as approved by the Bryan School Undergraduate Student 
Services (BSUSS) or approved by the faculty advisor. At 
least 15 hours are to be at the 300-level or above. No 
more than 9 hours may be outside of the Department. All 
approved courses must address a career profile. Career 
profiles, planned by the BSUSS and the Department of 
Business Administration, are available to guide the stu- 
dent and the advisor. In cooperation with the student, 
the faculty advisor or a member of BSUSS can develop 
a new career profile or modify an existing career profile. 
Career profiles will be reviewed by the Department on 
an annual basis. 

Online Business Studies is comprised of 21 semester 
hours as approved by Bryan School Undergraduate Stu- 
dent Services or by the Online Program advisor. At least 
15 s.h. are to be at the 300 level or above. No more than 
nine (9) s.h. may be outside of the department. Online 
Business Studies accepts ENG 103 as "other approved 
ENG course" (see General Program Requirements, l.a. 
above). 

Entrepreneurship/Small Business: BUS 450; MGT 
470; MKT 327, 403, and two of the following: MGT 313, 
375, 409, 475, 493 1 ; MKT 325, 326, 422, 424, 493 1 . 
'Only one of the honors courses may be applied to this concentra- 
tion (MGT 493 or MKT 493). 

Human Resources: MGT 313, 315, 414, 475; and any 
two of the following: BUS 328, 450; MGT 314, 317, 318, 
354,375,493,499. 

V Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 122 total semester hours 
required for the degree. 

Continuation Requirements 

Students who have been admitted to the Business Admin- 
istration Major must be in good academic standing at UNCG, 
must maintain at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA, and must make 
a grade of C or better in the course work required for their 
concentration. 

International Business Studies Major (INTB) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U830 



General Program Requirements 

1 . Formal admission to the International Business Studies 
Program: 

a. Successful completion of ACC 201 or 218, 202; CST 
105; ECO 201, 202, 250; ENG 101 or FMS 115 or 
RCO 101, ENG 102 or other approved ENG course; 
ISM 110, 280; and MAT 120 or 191; and a foreign 
language at the intermediate level (e.g., FRE 204). 

b. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.50 

2. 122 s.h. 

3. Maintenance of a 2.50 overall GPA 

4. One semester study abroad 

5. At least 50 percent of the business semester hours 
required for the degree must be earned at UNCG 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Department specifies courses for: 

One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

MAT 120 or 191 
Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

PHI 361 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and CST 105 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

ECO 201 and 202 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers: 3-6 s.h. (1-2 
courses) of the same foreign language depending upon 
placement; 2-3 additional GL/GN courses, one of which 
must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



141 



Business Administration 



III Major and Related Area Requirements 

1. Fundamentals of Business (45 s.h.) 

ACC 201 or 218, 202; BUS 105A**; CST 105*; ECO 201*, 
202*, 250, 300*; ENG 101*, ENG 102 or other approved 
ENG course; FIN 315; ISM 110, 280; MAT 120* or 191*; 
MGT 301*, 309*, 312, 330, 491; MKT 320; SCM 302 
*MAT 120 or 191 fulfills GMT; ENG 101 or CST 105 fulfill GRD; 
ECO 201 and 202 fulfill GSB; ECO 300, MGT 301, and foreign 
language fulfill 9-12 semester hours ofGLIGN requirement; MGT 
309 fulfills major Wl and SI requirements; CST 105 fulfills SI 
requirement outside major. 

**BUS 105 A is for students entering UNCG as freshmen and 
must be taken during the first two semesters of enrollment. 

2. International Studies (18-24 s.h.) 

• Six (6) s.h. in a foreign language at the intermediate 
level (203-204 level) 

• Six (6) s.h. in a foreign language beyond the inter- 
mediate level in literature, 300-level conversation, 
or intensive language study in a foreign country 
Non-native speakers of English are exempted from 

the foreign language requirements and from the six (6) 
semester hours of literature, conversation or foreign 
study. 

• Three (3) to nine (9) s.h. in country/regional specific 
courses taken in a foreign country (e.g., Mexican 
Culture, Latin American Tradition and Culture, 
Doing Business in the European Union) 

3. Nine to ten (9-10) s.h. in one of the following categories: 

Marketing: MKT 426, plus two (2) courses from MKT 
326, 327, 421, 422, 424, 429, 493, or approved electives 

Economics: ECO 360 or 365, plus any two (2) ECO 
courses above the 300 level or approved electives 

Finance: FIN 330, 442, and 410 or approved elec- 
tives 

Accounting: ACC 218 and 318, plus two (2) courses 
above ACC 318 or approved electives 

Human Resource Management: MGT 313, plus two 
(2) courses from MGT 314, 315, 317, 475, 493, or approved 
electives 

Management: Three (3) courses from MGT 332, 354, 
375, 470, 493, or approved electives 

Supply Chain Management: SCM 306, plus two (2) 
courses from SCM 402, MGT 302, MKT 403, MKT 426, 
GEO 202 or approved electives 

Under special circumstances and with the permis- 
sion of the Committee, some substitutions for required 
courses may be made. Appropriate internships com- 
pleted during a semester/year abroad may serve as 
approved electives. 

4. One additional GEC Reasoning & Discourse (GRD) 
course (3 s.h.): required: CST 105 

IV Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for the degree. 



Marketing Major (MKTG) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U327 

General Program Requirements 

1. Formal admission to Marketing: 

a. Successful completion of ACC 201, 202; CST 105; 
ECO 201, 202, 250; ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 
101, ENG 102 or other approved ENG course; ISM 
110, 280; MAT 120 or 191 

b. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 

2. Grades of C or better in courses used to meet concentra- 
tion requirements 

3. 122 s.h. 

4. At least 50 percent of the business semester hours 
required for the degree must be earned at UNCG 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See complete GEC requirements and approved course 
listings for all categories. 

Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Department specifies courses for: 
One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

or foreign language XXX 203B 
(e.g., SPA 203B) or equivalent 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

MAT 120 or 191 
Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

PHI 361 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and CST 105 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

ECO 201 and 202 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See details and courses. It is possible to meet all GE 
Marker Requirements while completing the GE Core require- 
ments or courses required by the major/concentration. 
Students may select courses for: 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

Four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers: 3-6 s.h. (1-2 
courses) of the same foreign language depending upon 
placement; 2-3 additional GL/GN courses, one of which 
must carry the GN marker 



142 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Business Administration 



One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 

programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 
One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III Major and Related Area Requirements 

1. ACC 201, 202; BUS 105A 2 ; CST 105 1 ; ECO 201 1 , 202 1 , 
250, 300 1 ; ENG 101 \ ENG 102 or other approved ENG 
course; FIN 315; ISM 110, 280; MAT 120 1 or 191 '; MGT 
301 ', 309 1 , 312, 330, 491; MKT 320; SCM 302 

2. Nine (9) s.h. of a foreign language; see Foreign Lan- 
guage Requirements for details. 

: MAT 120 or 191 fulfills GMT; ENG 101 or CST 105 fulfill GRD; 
ECO 201 and 202 fulfill GSB; ECO 300, MGT 301, and foreign 
language fulfill 9-12 s.h. ofGL/GN requirement; MGT 309 fulfills 
major WI and SI requirements; CST 105 fulfills SI requirement 
outside major. 

2 BUS 105A is for students entering UNCG as freshmen and must 
be taken during the first two semesters of enrollment. Students are 
encouraged to take BUS 105A during their first semester if space 
is available. 

IV Additional Requirements 

MKT 422, 424, 426, 429, and any two of the following: 
BUS 450; MKT 325, 326, 327, 421, 493. All students pursuing 
the Marketing major must receive a C (2.0) or better in MKT 
320. 

V Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 122 total semester hours 
required for the degree. 

Continuation Requirements 

Students who have been admitted to the Marketing Major 
must be in good academic standing at UNCG, must maintain 
at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA, and must make a grade of C or 
better in the course work required for their major. 

Entrepreneurship Minor 

Required: minimum of 15 semester hours 

AOSCode: U832 

The Entrepreneurship minor, consisting of 15 s.h., is 
available for majors outside of the Bryan School of Business 
and Economics, as well as for majors in the Bryan School, who 
are in good standing with the University. Minimum average 
GPA of 2.0 required in all courses used toward minor. The two 
paths are outlined below: 

I. Non-Business Majors 

The minor complements professional and arts 
and sciences fields of study and is intended to bring 
an entrepreneurial perspective to all major fields of 
study. To earn an entrepreneurship minor, a student 
a must meet the following requirements in the order 
listed: 



a. Apply for the entrepreneurship minor in 
the Bryan School Student Services Office, 
Room 232 Bryan Buildingb. ENT/BUS 300, 
ENT/FIN 200 

c. ENT/BUS 336 

d. Consult with an advisor in the Bryan 
School Student Services Office to select 
one of the six profiles offered: Creative 
Industries, Family Business, Health Care, 
International, Social, or Technology 

e. Once admitted to minor, student takes at 
least one course within the selected profile. 

f. At least one course from approved elec- 
tives to meet minimum of required 15 s.h. 

II. Bryan School Majors 

The minor is intended to bring an entrepreneur- 
ial perspective to all majors in the Bryan School. To 
earn an entrepreneurship minor, a student must 
meet the following requirements in the order listed: 

a. Apply for the entrepreneurship minor in 
the Bryan School Student Services Office, 
Room 232 Bryan Building 

b. ENT/BUS 300 and FIN 315 

c. ENT/BUS 336 

d. Consult with an advisor in the Bryan 
School Student Services Office to select 
one of the six profiles offered: Creative 
Industries, Family Business, Health Care, 
International, Social, or Technology 

III. Profiles 

a. Creative Industries: one from DCE 455, HTM 
354, MST 196 or 496 

b. Family Business: ENT/BUS 337 

c. HealthCare: ENT/ISM 291 

d. International: ENT/BUS 342 

e. Social: ENT/MGT 340 

f. Technology: one from ENT/ISM 290, 291, 292, 
ENT/ECO 312 

IV. Electives for the Entrepreneurship Minor 

BUS/ENT 201, 337, 342, 499 2 ; DCE 455; ECO/ 
ENT 215, 312; FIN/ENT 335; HTM 354; ISM/ENT 
290, 291, 292; MGT/ENT 240, 340, 470; MKT/ENT 
403; MST 196 1 , 496 1 , 524, 525; PSC 51 IS; THR 584. 
} MST 196 or 496 must be repeated for a total of 3 s.h. 
2 In rare cases an Independent Study focused on entrepreneurial 
research or a special project may qualify with faculty approval. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



143 



Business Administration 



Business Administration Courses (BUS) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

100 Global Business, Markets, and Society (3:3) 

• Open to freshmen and sophomores 

Introductory exploration of the role of business in a free market 
society Introduction to basic business terminology Examination 
of current business issues facing actual companies. 

105A Introduction to Business Skills Development (1:2) 

• Open to first and second semester freshmen. 
Development of business skills determined by employers as criti- 
cal for success. Fosters development of skills early in a student's 
academic career to promote success in both college and work. 

105B Career Planning and Business Skills Assessment (1:1) 

Pr. sophomore standing 

Pr. or Coreq. ACC 201, 202; ECO 201, 202, 250; ISM 110, 280; 
ENG 101, 102; CST 105; MAT 115, 120 

• Course may not be repeated. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Introduction to career planning and development of business 
skills. Course includes exam to assess business skills develop- 
ment in the pre- and co-requisite courses. 

110 Exploring Business Basics (6:3:9) 

Pr. admission to an approved program 
Planned experiences and instruction to acquire skills and knowl- 
edge in regard to values, needs, and wants as well as customer 
service, self-assessment, problem-solving, and career planning. 

201 Creativity, Innovation, and Vision (3:3) 

GECore: GSB 
Creativity and innovation is examined through an interdisciplin- 
ary lens. We examine how creative and innovative thinking gives 
us the vision to see opportunities and how they impact society. 
(Fall & Spring) (Same as ENT 201) 

204 Experimental Course: Entrepreneurial Bootcamp (3:3) 

Provides students, in an intensive environment, with an assess- 
ment of their entrepreneurial potential and an introduction to the 
business discipline needed to convert potential into a sustainable 
endeavor. (Offered summer '07 and summer '08) (Same as ENT 
204) 

206 Campus Entrepreneurs (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing; admission to an approved program 
Students learn the basics of establishing a new business from idea 
to inception through the finalized business plan. Students may 
have the opportunity to establish a viable business on campus. 
(Same as ENT 206; formerly BUS 306) 

220 Field Experience in Business (3) 

Pr. admission to an approved program 
Provides students with an early business experience. Require- 
ments consist of a minimum of 300 hours of employment and 
completion of designated educational activities. 

230 Applied Business Concepts (6:3:15-30) 

Pr. admission to an approved program 
Extension of business knowledge through on-site study of a busi- 
ness or organization. Includes 45 hours of classroom and profes- 
sional development activities. Written assignments, reports, and/ 
or papers required. 



240 Introduction to the Entrepreneurial Experience (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing; admission to an approved program 
Introduction to the entrepreneurial experience including historical 
perspectives, the role of entrepreneurs in supporting the economy, 
the entrepreneurial process, venture creation, and innovation. 
(Same as ENT 240; formerly MGT 240) 

300 Ideas to Opportunities: Feasibility Analysis (3:3) 

Pr. ENT/FIN 200 or ENT/F1N 315; or permission of instructor 
Provides the knowledge and skills to develop a feasibility plan 
for a new business venture that will be the basis for developing a 
business plan. (Fall & Spring) (Same as ENT 300) 

305 Introduction to the Business of Health-Care 
Management (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing 
Influence of health-care services/systems on business organiza- 
tions. Issues of health-care organizations, professions, ethics, and 
assessment. Organizational patterns for health-care delivery and 
issues in financing health care. 

328 Organizational Leadership (3:3) 

Pr. sopho?nore standing 
The course examines the theories and models of leadership. Envi- 
ronmental pressures, organizational objectives, company culture, 
and individual ethical standards will be examined to incorporate 
the situational determinants of leadership effectiveness. 

336 Opportunities to Action: Business Plan (3:3) 

Pr. ENT/BUS 300 
Provides the knowledge and skills to develop a feasibility plan 
into a business plan for a new venture, which culminates in a 
business plan competition. (Fall & Spring) (Same as ENT 336) 

337 Family Business (3:3) 

Overview of family business, including what is required for fam- 
ily harmony and business continuity. (Fall) (Same as ENT 337) 

338 Franchising (3:3) 

This course introduces the student to opportunities in franchising 
including becoming a franchisee or franchisor. (Fall) (Same as 
ENT 338) 

339 Entrepreneurial Leadership (3:3) 

Leadership theories, skills, and practices necessary for effective- 
ness in varied entrepreneurial settings, including private busi- 
nesses, corporations, not-for-profit organizations, and social 
movements. (Summer) (Same as ENT 339) 

340 Social Entrepreneurship (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing; admission to an approved program 
Introduction to social entrepreneurship including identification 
of social problems and how they are solved through innovation, 
community impact, sustainability, ethical, scalable, economic 
value creation, and risk-taking efforts. (Fall & Spring) (Same as 
ENT 340; formerly MGT 340) 

342 International Entrepreneurship (3:3) 

Creation and management of business ventures with interna- 
tional dimensions are examined, and economic and formal/infor- 
mal institutions affecting entrepreneurship are discussed. (Same 
as ENT 342) 

413 Special Problems in Business and Marketing Education 
(1-3) 

Pr. junior standing; admission to an approved program 
Opportunity for students to work individually on a problem of 
special interest. Student should secure recommendation from an 
instructor and consult with the Division Director before register- 
ing for the course. 



144 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Business Administration 



450 Directed Business Practice in Entrepreneurship 
(1-4:1:3-12) 

Pr. junior standing; permission of instructor 

• Open to all majors. 

Planned work experience approved in advance by instructor. 
Regularly scheduled class attendance as well as reading, writing, 
and skill practice assignments are required. (Same as ENT 450) 

455 Coordination of Work-Based Programs (3) 

Pr. junior standing 
Philosophy, principles, strategies, techniques, and procedures 
for coordination of work-based programs. Emphasis on elements 
common to all areas of work-based programs. Review and analy- 
sis of pertinent research. 

463 Business/Marketing Education Instructional Materials 
and Methods (3:3) 

Pr. senior standing 
Analysis, planning, and evaluation of instructions in business 
education and marketing education, including attention to spe- 
cial needs groups. 

465 Supervised Teaching (9) 

Pr. 463; ELC 381, TED 450, 470 
Observation, teaching under supervision, and participation in 
the total school and related community activities of a teacher. 
Full-time responsibility for at least twelve weeks. 

469 Business/Marketing Education Programs: 
Development, Organization, and Operation (3:3) 

Pr. senior standing 
Emphasizes historical development and present organizational 
structure of business education and marketing education at the 
district, regional, and state levels. 

470 Entrepreneurial Small Business Management (3:3) 

Pr. MKT 320, FIN 315, SCM 302; admission to an approved 
program 
Application of management principles to small business organi- 
zations. How to start a new enterprise. Requirements for success- 
ful operation of a small business. (Fall) (Same as ENT 470) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

497 Survey of Business and Marketing Education (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing and permission of director 
Emphasis on philosophy and organization of business and mar- 
keting education programs in North Carolina, curriculum and 
instructional design, sources and uses of occupational informa- 
tion and program evaluative measures. 

498 Curriculum and Classroom Organization of Business 
and Marketing Programs (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing and permission of director 
Designed for pre-service and in-service teachers of business and 
marketing programs. Emphasis on curriculum development, 
teaching techniques, resources, facilities, and evaluation. 

499 Selected Topics in Entrepreneurship (1-3) 

Pr. junior standing; permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Study of topics of common interest to those interested in entre- 
preneurship. Group discussion and study rather than indepen- 
dent study emphasized. Generally non-recurring topics studied. 
(Same as ENT 499) 



Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 
for graduate-level courses. 

Master of Business Administration Courses 
(MBA) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

595 Selected Topics in Business Administration (1.5-3.0) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated when topic varies. 

Opportunity for advanced students of Business Administration 
to study, in depth, a topic or issue of special interest. (All) 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 
for additional graduate-level courses. 

Management Courses (MGT) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

200 Management of Organizations (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing 
An introduction to how managers coordinate human and material 
resources to achieve organizational goals. Effective management 
practices that can be applied to business, educational, governmen- 
tal, hospital, and social service organizations. 

301 Introduction to International Business (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. ECO 300; admission to approved program 
Introduction to the environmental factors which increasingly 
cause businesses to become international in the scope of their 
activities. Nature of global business and multinational organiza- 
tions analyzed. 

302 International Business: Operations and Environments 
in Foreign Jurisdictions (4:4-6:6) 

Pr. ECO 300; admission to an approved program 
Study of international business environments from the manage- 
rial aspect, and of practices and principles of conducting interna- 
tional business from the perspective of a specific foreign country. 
(Summer) 

303 Experience Business Abroad (2:2-6:6) 

Pr. admission to an approi>ed program 

• May be repeated for credit if course is taken in different country. 
Practices and principles for conducting business in foreign coun- 
tries. Experiential learning in management and organizational 
leadership skills. Lectures/seminars by academicians and busi- 
ness people. Creating, organizing presenting seminars, sympo- 
sia. 

304 Current Issues in International Business (3:3) 

Pr. admission to an approved program 
Selected topics in international business presented by visiting 
faculty. Topics are related to the expertise of the instructor. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



145 



Business Administration 



309 Business Communications (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing and admission to approved program 
• Taught as Writing Intensive (WI) and Speaking Intensive (SI) 
Business and professional communication: job search skills; 
teamwork; communication technology; verbal and non-verbal 
strategies. Emphasizes effective persuasive, interpersonal, inter- 
cultural, and organizational strategies through business styles, 
formats, and presentations. 

312 Human Behavior in Business Organizations (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing 
Businesses as a generic class of organization. Relation of indi- 
vidual worker and manager to organization and its impact upon 
them. Formal and informal groups. Management from behav- 
ioral point of view. Stability and change within business orga- 
nizations. 

313 Human Resource Management (3:3) 

Pr. admission to approved program 
An analysis of how human resources contribute to organizational 
performance, and the management of those human resources 
including recruitment, selection, compensation, training and 
development, performance, appraisal, and union/management 
relations. 

314 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3:3) 

Pr. admission to approved program 
Introduction to industrial and organizational psychology with 
special emphasis on employee motivation, selection, training, 
and organizational determinants of employee behavior. (Fall) 
(Same as PSY 314.) 

315 Selection and Compensation (3:3) 

Pr. MGT 313; admission to approved program 
Selection theory and the uses of assessment devices. Principles 
of compensation and job evaluation. Market surveys and their 
effects on pay structure. (Spring) 

317 Training and Development in Organizations (3:3) 

Pr. admission to approved program 
Principles of training and development. Training needs, assess- 
ment, training solutions to organization problems, skill training, 
different training options, and ways of integrating new behavior 
and attitudes into the organizational system. 

318 Organizational Change and Development (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing; admission to approved program 
Introduction to the professional practice of OCD. Topics include 
overcoming resistance to change, the consultant/client relation- 
ship, diagnosis of organizational problems, and interventions 
used by internal and external OCD consultants. 

330 The Legal Environment of Business (3:3) 

Survey of the legal, political, and ethical environment in which 
business decisions are made. Antitrust, employment, and con- 
sumer laws included. Federal, state, and international laws cov- 
ered. 

331 Legal Aspects of Business Transactions (3:3) 

Pr. admission to B.S. Accounting program 
Subjects covered include court systems, contract and sales law, 
professional ethics, business political activities, Antitrust laws, 
international laws, and other matters of public policy. 

332 Legal Aspects of Management (3:3) 

Pr. MGT 330 or 331; admission to an approved program 
Securities regulations, negotiable instruments law, and debtor 
and creditor rights included. Also covered are legal relationships- 
partnerships, corporations, and principal-agency. 



354 Managing Diversity in Organizations (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing 
Explores diversity in the workplace. Diversity is defined, exam- 
ined, and discussed as opportunities for companies to discover 
and appreciate differences while developing more effective orga- 
nizations. 

375 Management Process Skills (3:3) 

Pr. admission to approved program 
Practical application of management theory. Processes for per- 
forming the basic management functions of decision making, 
planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Application of the 
processes to management cases. 

409 Advanced Business Communication (3:3) 

Pr. MGT 309; admission to an approved program 
Study of advanced business communication situations, including 
persuasive messages, crisis management, cross-cultural business 
communication, effective work team interaction, effective virtual 
communication. Attention to the technology that supports busi- 
ness communication. 

414 Human Resource Information Systems (3:3) 

Pr. MGT 313 or ISM 301; admission to approved program 
Application of ERP systems to managing human resource infor- 
mation. Topics include SAP, job analysis/evaluation; human 
resource planning, recruiting, screening, selection, training; 
employee development, performance appraisal, compensation, 
benefits. 

475 Employment and Human Resource Law (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing; MGT 330; admission to approved program 
National Labor Relations Act, Fair Labor Standards Act (includ- 
ing equal employment), and other statutes and court decisions 
relating to employment relations and their effect on managerial 
practices. (Spring) 

491 Business Policy and Strategy (3:3) 

Pr. MGT 301, 309, 312, 330; MKT 320; FIN 315; ISM 280; 
SCM 302; senior standing; admission to approved program 
Capstone case course in top management policy and strategy 
determination. Students learn to integrate various business func- 
tions and to develop skills and judgment in solving problems of 
the organization as a total system in relation to its environment. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

499 Problems in Management (3:3) 

Pr. senior majors; permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit with approval of department head. 
Independent study, research, and class discussion covering a 
topic or group of related topics of current interest in theory or 
policy of the business enterprise. Topics vary from semester to 
semester. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for graduate-level courses. 



146 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Business Administration 



Marketing Courses (MKT) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

320 Principles of Marketing (3:3) 

Pr. ISM 110, MAT 115, ECO 201, ACC 201, and CST 105; or 
admission to Bryan School approved program 
Introduction to marketing with an emphasis on market segmen- 
tation, targeting, and positioning for consumer and business 
markets in domestic and international economics. 

325 E-commerce in Marketing (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MKT 320; admission to a program of 
study in the Bryan School 
Introduction to e-commerce. Online and offline assignments, 
lectures, in-class group projects, case analyses, discussions and 
presentations. 

326 Introduction to Retailing (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MKT 320; junior standing; admission to 
approved program 
Introductory course in the fundamentals of store organization, 
management, and merchandising. 

327 Selling and Sales Management (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MKT 320; junior standing; admission to 
approved program 
Problems in selling and sales management are dealt with from 
the strategic marketing perspective. The sales management pro- 
cess is addressed from the perspective of the profit-maximizing 
allocation of resources of the firm. 

403 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MGT312 or MKT 320; senior standing; 
admission to approved program 
Focuses on marketing strategy, planning, and tactics for entrepre- 
neurial firms. Addresses general marketing issues and specific 
"real world" marketing problems. Entrepreneurial firms serve 
as clients for student consulting teams. (Spring) (Same as ENT 
403) 

408 Operating Problems in Retailing (3:3) 

Pr. MKT 326 and 327; junior standing; admission to approved 
program 
Examination and evaluation of politics and practices in retailing, 
with emphasis on advertising and its economic significance. 

418 Advanced Merchandising (3:3) 

Pr. MKT 326 and 327; junior standing; admission to approved 
program 
Merchandising policies, buying, stock planning and control, and 
merchandise pricing in modern retail stores. 

421 Promotion Management (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MKT 320; admission to approved 
program 
Promotion process and decision criteria for making promotion 
management decisions. Emphasis on behavioral and communi- 
cative aspects of advertising, personal sales, and other promo- 
tional tools from a management decision-making viewpoint. 

422 Fundamentals of Marketing Research (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 250, grade of Cor better in MKT 320; admission to 
approved program 
Marketing information systems, sampling theory, experimental 
design, psychological scaling techniques, longitudinal analysis. 
Particular attention to assumption structure underlying each 
technique. Case studies and problem approach. Student develops 
programs of action on basis of marketing research results. 



424 Consumer Behavior (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MKT 320; junior standing; admission to 
approved program 
Psychological and socioeconomic factors affecting consumer 
motivation, behavior, and buying decisions. Emphasis on current 
research on, and theory about, behavior of consumers as indi- 
viduals and as members of socioeconomic groups. 

426 International Marketing (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MKT 320; admission to approved 
program 
Issues in international marketing are addressed from both theo- 
retical and experiential learning perspectives. A comprehensive 
team-based project involves the intensive use of the Internet in 
accessing electronic databases. 

429 Advanced Marketing Management (3:3) 

Pr. MKT 422 and 424; admission to an approved program 
Advanced analysis and decision-making techniques in market- 
ing. Emphasis on strategic view. Major group project involves 
working with organizations to develop and present an actual 
marketing plan. (Formerly MKT 321) 

450 Experimental Course: Marketing Internship (3:3) 

Pr. MKT 320 and 422, 2.75 or higher GPA, and permission of 
instructor 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Minimum of 100 hours of planned work experience in a market- 
ing firm or the marketing department of a business/organization. 
(Offered fall '09) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



147 



Chemistry & Biochemistry 



Department of 
Chemistry and Biochemistry 

College of Arts & Sciences 

435 Science Building 

336/334-5714 
www.uncg.edu/che 

Faculty 

Patricia Reggio, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Bowen, Nile, Taylor, Walsh 

Associate Professors Banks, Cech, Golemi-Kotra, Haddy, Kotra, 

Rawer 
Assistant Professors Chin, Dawson, Duffy, Reddick 
Lecturers Burnes, Gresham, Reitz 
Laboratory Assistants Barber, Katsikas 
Visiting Associate Professor Frankliji 

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers 
five undergraduate programs: the Bachelor of Science in 
Chemistry, the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry, the Bach- 
elor of Science in Chemistry with a Concentration in Bio- 
chemistry, the Bachelor of Science with a Concentration in 
Research, and the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry A licensure 
program to prepare students to teach high school chemistry is 
offered. The Master of Science in Chemistry Master of Science 
in Biochemistry, and Ph.D. in Medicinal Chemistry are offered 
at the graduate level (see Tlxe Graduate School Bulletin). A Mas- 
ter's degree with a Chemistry Education concentration is also 
offered through the Department of Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion. Students who follow the program leading to the Bachelor 
of Science in Chemistry degrees are certified to the American 
Chemical Society as having met its rigorous requirements for 
undergraduate professional training in chemistry. 

The Department's biochemistry programs (B.S. in Bio- 
chemistry and B.S. in Chemistry with Concentration in Bio- 
chemistry) provide students with excellent preparation for 
graduate work in biochemistry and related life sciences, as 
well as for employment in chemical and biotechnological 
industries. These programs are also attractive to students 
planning careers in the health professions. 

One of the features of our undergraduate program which 
we particularly emphasize is the opportunity for students to 
engage in undergraduate research. Many of our majors do so, 
principally in their junior and senior years, and this provides 
excellent training for those who intend to continue their stud- 
ies at the graduate level. 

Chemistry Major (CHEM) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U121 

The Chemistry Major (B.A.), while less specialized than 
the B.S. program, provides sound training in chemistry. It 
offers fine preparation for those planning to enter medicine 
or dentistry, secondary school teaching, or various vocations 



within the chemical industry. In fact, by electing some addi- 
tional courses in chemistry beyond the minimum required, 
the student may prepare for graduate work under this pro- 
gram as well as under the B.S. While this program allows a 
more flexible arrangement of schedules, the student should 
work closely with a chemistry advisor to be certain that the 
proper sequence of chemistry and related area courses is 
taken with regard to the prerequisites. 



Requirements 



I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

required: MAT 191 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 7 

required: CHE 111 and 112, and PHY 211 or 291 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers; at least one 
course must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Humanities and Fine Arts 3 

one additional Literature (GLT) course 
Natural Sciences (GNS/GLS) 3-4 

any GLS course 



148 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Chemistry & Biochemistry 



Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 
a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

1. CHE 111*, 112*, 114, 115, 331, 333, 342, 351, 352, 354, 372, 
401 (audit), 402, 406 or 461 

2. Two courses from among: CHE 420 or (556 and 557, 
which counts as one course), 442, 481, 531, 536, 553 
Only major requirement and related area requirement 

courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the major. Students must earn a C- or better 
in prerequisite major requirement and related area require- 
ment courses before advancing to subsequent courses. 

V Related Area Requirements 

1. MAT 191*, 292 

2. PHY 211*, 212 or PHY 291*, 292 

Only major requirement and related area requirement 
courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the major. Students must earn a C- or better 
in prerequisite major requirement and related area require- 
ment courses before advancing to subsequent courses. 
*MAT 191 satisfies GMT; CHE 111,112 and PHY 211 or PHY 
291 satisfy GNS. 

VI Electives 

Electives should be sufficient to complete the 122 semes- 
ter hours required for the degree. Additional advanced 
courses in mathematics are advised. CST 105 is recommended 
as a GRD requirement. Additional chemistry courses above 
the 100 level may be taken. 

Chemistry Major (CHEM) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Chemistry, U123 

Chemistry Research, U168 

Biochemistry, U124 

The Chemistry Maj or (B.S.) differs from the B. A. in requir- 
ing additional advanced courses in chemistry and/or related 
sciences. It provides very thorough undergraduate training in 
chemistry and an excellent background for students planning 
to undertake graduate work or to enter the chemical indus- 
try. Students who complete this program will be certified to 
the American Chemical Society upon graduation as having 
fulfilled the Society's requirements for undergraduate profes- 
sional training. The sequence in which the required courses 
are taken is important, and the student should work closely 
with a chemistry advisor in planning a schedule. 



The concentration in Chemistry Research offers stu- 
dents the option to specialize in research and be exposed to 
four years of research. The concentration is designed to pre- 
pare students for graduate training in chemistry, biochemis- 
try, medicine, and related professions or for employment in 
chemistry, biochemistry, or related industries. The exposure 
to research will build strong research, communication, and 
leadership skills. Such skills are in great demand. 

The concentration in Biochemistry offers students the 
option to specialize in biochemistry within the curriculum 
leading to the B.S. in Chemistry. This concentration is designed 
to prepare students for graduate training in biochemistry, 
medicine, and related professions, or for employment in bio- 
chemistry or biotechnology related industries. The sequence 
in which the required courses are taken is important, and the 
student should work closely with a chemistry advisor in plan- 
ning a schedule. 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

required: MAT 191 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 7 

required: CHE 111 and 112, and PHY 291 
students in the Chemistry Research 
concentration may also choose PHY 211 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers; at least one 
course must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 



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III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Humanities and Fine Arts 3 

one additional Literature (GLT) course 
Natural Sciences (GNS/GLS) 3-4 

any GLS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 
Chemistry Concentration 

CHE 111*, 112*, 114, 115, 331, 333, 342, 351, 352, 354, 
372, 401 (audit), 402, 420 or (556 and 557 which counts as one 
course), 442, 461, 462, 463, 464, 481, 531, 533 

Only major requirement and related area requirement 
courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the major. Students must earn a C- or better 
in prerequisite major requirement and related area require- 
ment courses before advancing to subsequent courses. 

Chemistry Research Concentration 

1. CHE 111*, 112, 114, 191, 291, 292, 331, 333, 342, 351, 352, 
354, 372, 391, 392, 401 (audit), 402, 406 or 461, 491, 492 

2. Two courses from among: CHE 420 or 556 and 557 
(which count as one course), 442, 481, 531, 553 

Only major requirement and related area requirement 
courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the major. Students must earn a C- or better 
in prerequisite major requirement and related area require- 
ment courses before advancing to subsequent courses. 

Biochemistry Concentration 

CHE 111*, 112*, 114, 115, 331, 333, 342, 351, 352, 354, 372, 
401 (audit), 402, 407, 461, 462, 531, 533, 556, 557, 558 

Only major requirement and related area requirement 
courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the concentration. Students must earn a 
C- or better in prerequisite major requirement and related 
area requirement courses before advancing to subsequent 
courses. 

V Related Area Requirements 
Chemistry Concentration 

1. MAT 191*, 292, 293 

2. PHY 291*, 292 



3. At least one course selected from: CHE 490, 491, 492, 
(minimum of 2 s.h. total for any combination of 491 
and 492 count as one course), 493, 536, 553, 555, 570 
(minimum 2 s.h. total for any combination of CHE 570 
courses, counts as one course); BIO 355, 392, 477, 479, 
506; CSC 230, 322, 330, 339, 523, 524; MAT 310, 311, 345, 
390, 394, 395; PHY 321, 323, 325, 327, 412, 413, 421, 426 
Only major requirement and related area requirement 
courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the major. Students must earn a C- or better 
in prerequisite major requirement and related area require- 
ment courses before advancing to subsequent courses. 

Chemistry Research Concentration 

1. MAT 191*, 292 

2. PHY 211*, 212 or PHY 291*, 292 

Only major requirement and related area requirement 
courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the major. Students must earn a C- or better 
in prerequisite major requirement and related area require- 
ment courses before advancing to subsequent courses. 
*MAT 191 satisfies GMT; CHE 111,112 and PHY 211 and 291 
satisfy GNS. 

Biochemistry Concentration 

1. Advanced biochemistry: 3^4 s.h. from CHE 491 or 492 

2. BIO 111*, 112,392 

3. MAT 191*, 292 

4. PHY 291*, 292 

Only major requirement and related area requirement 
courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the concentration. Students must earn a 
C- or better in prerequisite major requirement and related 
area requirement courses before advancing to subsequent 
courses. 

*MAT 191 satisfies GMT; CHE 111,112 and PHY 291 satisfy 
GNS; BIO 111 satisfies CAR GES. 

VI Electives 
Chemistry Concentration 

Electives should be sufficient to complete the 122 semes- 
ter hours required for the degree. Additional advanced math- 
ematics courses are advised. Additional chemistry courses 
above the 100 level may be taken. CST 105, which fulfills the 
GRD requirement, is also recommended. 

Chemistry Research Concentration 

Electives should be sufficient to complete the 122 semes- 
ter hours required for the degree. Additional advanced math- 
ematics courses are advised. CST 105, which fulfills the GRD 
requirement, is recommended. 

Biochemistry Concentration 

Electives should be sufficient to complete the 122 semes- 
ter hours required for the degree. One additional advanced 
biology course (e.g., BIO 355 or 481) is strongly recom- 
mended. CST 105, which fulfills the GRD requirement, is rec- 
ommended. 



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Biochemistry Major (BCHE) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U860 

The Biochemistry Major (B.S.) is designed to prepare 
students for graduate training in the biochemical sciences, 
medicine, and other health professions, or for employment in 
biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Stu- 
dents who complete the Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry 
will meet all or most of the academic requirements for admis- 
sion to medical, dental, veterinary, or pharmacy schools. 

The curriculum involves a solid foundation of Chemistry 
and Biology courses, along with core and advanced elective 
courses in Biochemistry. Undergraduate research is encour- 
aged, and students may collaborate with participating faculty 
from a variety of departments (Chemistry, Biology, Nutrition, 
Physics, and Kinesiology). 

This program follows the biochemistry curriculum rec- 
ommendations of the American Society of Biochemists and 
Molecular Biologists. 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

required: MAT 191 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 7 

required: CHE 111 and 112, and PHY 211 or 291 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 
Students may select courses for: 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers; at least one 
course must carry the GN marker 
One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 



One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 

programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Humanities and Fine Arts 3 

one additional Literature (GLT) course 
Natural Sciences (GNS/GLS) 3-4 

required: BIO 111 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

CHE 111* 112*, 114, 115, 331, 333, 342, 351, 352, 354, 372, 
401 (audit), 402, 406, 407, 556, 557, 558 

Only major requirement and related area requirement 
courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the major. Students must earn a C- or better 
in prerequisite major requirement and related area require- 
ment courses before advancing to subsequent courses. 

V Related Area Requirements 

1. MAT 191*, 292 

2. BIO 111 and 112, and either BIO 392, 393 (lab), or BIO 
355, 356 (lab) 

3. PHY 211*, 212 or 291*, 292 

4. Advanced Biochemistry Elective or Independent Study 
(3-4 s.h.)-CHE 570B or BIO 494, or one of the following 
independent study courses: CHE 491, 492; BIO 499; ESS 
475; NTR 427; PHY 495 

5. Advanced Biological Science Elective (3-4 s.h.)— one or 
more of the following: BIO 277, 424, 464, 477, 479, 481, 
494 strongly recommended (if not used as Advanced 
Biochemistry elective), 578, 583, 584, 595, 596; PHY 543 
Only major requirement and related area requirement 

courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be 
counted toward the major. Students must earn a C- or better 
in prerequisite major requirement and related area require- 
ment courses before advancing to subsequent courses. 
*MAT 191 satisfies GMT; CHE 111,112 and PHY 211 or 291 
satisfy GNS. 

VI Electives 

Electives should be sufficient to complete the 122 semester 
hours required for the degree. Additional advanced courses 
in Chemistry and Biology are recommended. CST 105, which 
fulfills the GRD requirement, is recommended. 



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Chemistry Minor 

Required: minimum of 19 semester hours 

AOSCode: U121 

A student may earn a minor in chemistry by completing 
a minimum of 19 semester hours in chemistry including CHE 
114, 115 and eight (8) hours at the 300 level, with no more 
than eight (8) hours from introductory-level courses (CHE 
101, 103, 104, 110, 111, 112, 114, 115.) 

Chemistry Major with High School Teaching 
Licensure (CHEM) 

B.A. in Chemistry with Standard Professional I License, 
U125 

B.S. in Chemistry with Standard Professional I License, 
U126 

*Requirements 

*Tlie requirements for licensure will be revised beginning in fall 
2010 under direction of the Department of Public Instruction. 
Adjustments to the requirements listed here will likely be necessary. 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 6 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Department specifies courses for: 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

required: MAT 191 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 7 

required: CHE 111 and 112, and GEO 103 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

required: HEA 201 and PSY 121 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 
Students may select courses for: 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers; at least one 
course must carry the GN marker 
One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 



One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 

programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences (GNS/GLS) 4 

required: BIO 111 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

Completion of major requirements for either the B.A. in 
Chemistry or B.S. in Chemistry. 

Additional requirements for teacher licensure, beyond 
the Chemistry Major requirements, are listed under Teachers 
Academy. In addition, students must take 6-8 credits in biol- 
ogy and/or earth science chosen from the following: 

1. BIO 111*, 112 

2. GEO 103* and one or more of GEO 111, 205, 311, 
314. CHE 252 is also recommended. 

*B101U satisfies CAR GLS; CHE 111 & 112 and GEO 103, 
satisfy GNS. 

V Related Area Requirements 

(See Teachers Academy for full explanation.) 

1. General Education Requirements as identified within 
each major 

2. HEA 201* Personal Health 

3. ELC 381 The Institution of Education 

4. TED 545 Diverse Learners 

5. TED 450 Psychological Foundations of Education 

6. TED 465 Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary 
School 

7. TED 470 Reading Education for Secondary and Special 
Subject Teachers 

8. TED 559 Teaching Practices and Curriculum in Science 
*HEA 201 satisfies GSB. 

Accelerated Master's Programs 
for Chemistry Majors 

Interested students should see Accelerated Master's 
Programs for Undergraduates for details about the B.A. in 
Chemistry/M.B.A. and B.S. in Chemistry/M.S. in Chemistry 
program requirements. 



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Chemistry Courses (CHE) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses For Undergraduates 

101 Introductory Chemistry (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

• For elementary education, business, and liberal arts majors. 

• Students cannot receive credit for both 101 and either 111 or 103. 

• CHE 110 is recommended as corequisite. 

Survey of fundamentals of measurement, molecular structure, 
reactivity, and organic chemistry; applications to textiles, envi- 
ronmental, consumer, biological, and drug chemistry. (Fall & 
Spring & Summer) 

103 General Descriptive Chemistry I (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq. CHE 110 must be taken concurrently unless student takes 
CHE 104 or CHE 111 later 

• Not open to students who have already taken CHE 111. 
Introductory course for students whose programs require only 
one year of college chemistry. Among the topics introduced are 
states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear chemis- 
try, stoichiometry, and solutions. (Fall) 

104 General Descriptive Chemistry II (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Pr. 103 or permission of instructor 

Coreq. CHE 110 must be taken concurrently unless taken with CHE 
103. 
Applications of the principles introduced in 103 to representa- 
tive inorganic, organic, and biological systems. Topics include 
equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and introductory organic and 
biochemical concepts. (Spring) 

110 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory (1:0:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq. To be taken concurrently with either CHE 103 or 104. Also 
may accompany CHE 101. 
Designed to acquaint non-science majors with basic laboratory 
practices. (Fall & Spring) 

111 General Chemistry I (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Pr. one year of high school chemistry or 103; students lacking high 
school chemistry should take the sequence CHE 103, 111, 114 

Coreq. 112 
Fundamental principles of chemistry, including stoichiometry, 
atomic structure, and states of matter. (Fall & Spring) 

112 General Chemistry I Laboratory (1:0:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq. CHE 111 
Laboratory work to accompany 111. (Fall & Spring) 
114 General Chemistry II (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Pr. CHE 103, 104, and 110 with performance in each at the B level 

or higher, or 111, 112 
Coreq. CHE 115 

• Designed primarily for science majors and is the prerequisite to 
upper level courses in chemistry. 

Continuation of 111 with attention to ionic equilibria, elementary 
kinetics and thermodynamics, acid-base theory, coordination 
chemistry, and electrochemistry. (Fall & Spring) 



115 General Chemistry II Laboratory (1:0:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Pr. 112 or equivalent 

Coreq. 114 
Laboratory work to accompany 114. Includes semi-micro qualita- 
tive analysis and ionic equilibria experiments. (Fall & Spring) 

191 Introduction to Research (1:0:3) 

Pr. CHE 111 and 112 

Coreq. CHE 114 
Introduction to the basic concepts of research, involving multi- 
step experiments and discussion of research opportunities. (Fall 
& Spring & Summer) 

205 Introductory Organic Chemistry (3:3) 

Pr. 104, 110; or 114, 115 
Coreq. 206 

• Students cannot receive credit for both 205 and 351. 

A course in organic chemistry designed for students whose pro- 
grams require only one semester in this area. (Fall) 

206 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1:0:3) 

Coreq. 205 
Laboratory work to accompany 205. (Fall) 

252 Chemistry and the Human Environment (3:3) 

Pr. CHE 101, 104, or 114 or permission of instructor 
Study of chemical problems central to current technological, 
biomedical, and environmental issues. Topics include energy 
alternatives, food chemicals, environmental chemistry, molecular 
basis of drug action, and consumer products. (Spring) 

291, 292 Sophomore Research (1-3:0:3-9), (1-3:0:3-9) 

Pr. CHE 114 and 115 

• Each course may be repeated for credit for up to three (3) credits. 
Sophomore-level research in chemistry and biochemistry. Par- 
ticipation in a research project directed by a faculty supervisor. 
(291— Fall & Summer I; 292 — Spring & Summer II) 

331 Quantitative Analysis (3:3) 

Pr. 114, 115 

Coreq. All students must take 333 concurrently unless they have 
previous credit for an equivalent course. 
Introduction to the theory and practice of volumetric and gravi- 
metric methods of analysis. (Fall) 

333 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Coreq. 331 must be taken concurrently. 
Laboratory work to accompany 331. (Fall) 

342 Inorganic Chemistry (3:3) 

Pr. CHE 114, 115 
Introduction to theoretical principles, structure, and reactivity of 
main group metals and nonmetals and transition metals includ- 
ing industrial, bioinorganic and organometallic chemistry, and 
inorganic materials and nanomaterials. (Fall) (Formerly CHE 
242) 

351 Organic Chemistry I (4:4) 

Pr. 114, 115 
Chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic compounds with attention 
to reaction mechanisms and synthetic applications, and the appli- 
cation of spectroscopy to structure determination. (Fall & Sum- 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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Chemistry & Biochemistry 



352 Organic Chemistry II (3:3) 

Pr. 351 

Coreq. All students must take 354 concurrently unless they have 
previous credit for an equivalent course. 
Continuation of 351 with attention to alcohols, ethers, aldehydes 
and ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines, lipids, car- 
bohydrates, and organic spectroscopy. (Spring & Summer) 

354 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Coreq. 352 must be taken concurrently. 
Laboratory work to accompany 352. Includes basic techniques of 
organic laboratory practice plus preparations involving represen- 
tative reactions. (Spring & Summer) 

372 Introduction to Laboratory Methods (2:2) 

Pr. 205 or 351 
An introduction to the practical skills of laboratory work, to 
include safe handling and disposal of chemicals, laboratory 
practice and equipment, data handling, chemical literature, and 
searching for chemical information. (Spring) 

391, 392 Junior Research (1-3:0:3-9), (1-3:0:3-9) 

Pr. CHE 352 and 354 or CHE 331 and 333 and permission of 
instructor 

• Each course may he repeated for credit for up to three (3) credits. 
Junior-level research in chemistry and biochemistry. Participation 
in a research project directed by a faculty supervisor. (391 —Fall 
& Summer I; 392 — Spring & Summer II) 

401 Chemistry Seminar Introduction (0:0) 

Pr. 372, senior standing 

• Students audit 401 and receive credit for 402. 

Preparation for seminar. Introduction to the selection of semi- 
nar topics and seminar presentation techniques. Attendance at 
weekly seminars required. (Fall & Spring) 

402 Chemistry Seminar (1:1) 

Pr. 401 

• Students audit 401 and receive credit for 402. 

Oral reports and discussion of topics from the current chemistry 
literature by students, staff, and guest lecturers. Attendance at 
weekly seminars is required. (Fall & Spring) 

405 Nutritional Biochemistry (3:3) 

Pr. C (2.0) or better in CHE 103, 104, (110 lab) or CHE 111(112 
lab), 114 (115 lab); CHE 205 (206 lab) or CHE 351, 352 (354 
lab); BIO 277; NTR 413; Nutrition major or permission of 
instructor. 
The biochemical basis of nutrient structure, function, and metab- 
olism; integration of metabolism at the cellular and biochemi- 
cal levels; and applications of nutrient metabolism in total body 
function. (Spring) 

406 Introductory Physical Chemistry (4:4) 

Pr. two semesters of chemistry beyond general chemistry, MAT 292, 
one year of physics 

• Students cannot receive credit for both 406 and 461 toward an 
undergraduate degree 

Study of the concepts basic to chemical kinetics, equilibrium, 
energetics, spectroscopy, solution phenomena, electrochemistry, 
and colloidal behavior with applications to biological systems. 
Theory of methods and instrumentation also examined. (Fall) 

407 Introductory Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Coreq. CHE 406 
Laboratory work related to 406 with emphasis on mathematical 
treatment of experimental data and communication of results in 
report form. (Fall) 



420 Chemical Principles of Biochemistry (3:3) 

Pr. 352; BIO 111-112 strongly recommended 
Introduction to major classes of biomolecules and to genetic and 
metabolic pathways in living systems; emphasis on chemical 
nature of biological processes and the driving forces that make 
them work. (Fall) 

442 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3:3) 

Pr. 242, 406 or 461 

Coreq. 406 or 461 may be taken concurrently. 
Modern concepts of chemical bonding and its application to inor- 
ganic reactions and periodic relationships. (Spring) 

461 Physical Chemistry I (4:4) 

Pr. MAT 292 and PHY 292 

• Students cannot receive credit for both 461 and 406 toward an 
undergraduate degree. 

Chemical thermodynamics and equilibrium processes covered, 
including phase equilibria, thermodynamics of solutions, kinet- 
ics, and electrochemistry. (Fall) 

462 Physical Chemistry II (3:3) 

Pr. 461 
Subject material deals with microscopic world including intro- 
ductions to quantum mechanics, molecular spectroscopy, and 
statistical mechanics. (Spring) 

463 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Pr. 331, 333 

Coreq. 406 or 461 
Laboratory work related to 461 with emphasis on mathematical 
treatment of experimental data and communication of results in 
report form. (Fall) 

464 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Pr. 461, 463 

Coreq. 462 
Additional laboratory work primarily in kinetics and the determi- 
nation of molecular structure. This is a writing emphasis course. 
(Spring) 

481 Synthetic Techniques (2:0:8) 

Pr. 242, 352, 354, 372 
Theoretical discussion and laboratory practice in modern meth- 
ods of synthesis in the areas of organic and inorganic chemis- 
try. Emphasis given to regions of overlap such as organometallic 
chemistry. (Fall) 

490 Internship in Chemistry and Biochemistry (3:0:12) 

Pr. 333 or 354; junior status; overall GPA of 3.0 or better; and 
permission of instructor 
Practical experience in local industrial setting. Includes bi-weekly 
meeting with Departmental internship coordinator. Students 
must complete 12 hours a week at an internship site. (Fall & 
Spring & Summer) 

491, 492 Senior Research (1-3:0:3-9), (1-3:0:3-9) 

Pr. three (3) years of chemistry or biochemistry and permission of 
instructor 

• May be repeated for credit for a maximum of three (3) credits. 
Senior-level research in chemistry and biochemistry. Participation 
in a research project directed by a faculty supervisor. (491 — Fall 
& Summer I; 492 — Spring & Summer II) 



154 



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Classical Studies 



493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

499 Senior Thesis (2:0:8) 

Pr. completion of six (6) semesters of undergraduate research 
Preparation of a thesis based on a student's undergraduate 
research. (Fall & Spring & Summer) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

531 Instrumental Analysis (3:3) 

Pr. 331, 333, 205 or 352 (either may be taken concurrently), 
PHY 212 or 292 
Theory and practice of advanced analytical techniques with 
emphasis on instrumental methods of analysis. (Spring) 

533 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Coreq. 531 must be taken concurrently. 
Laboratory work to accompany 531. (Spring) 

536 Computational Chemistry (3:2:3) 

Pr. CHE 352, MAT 291, PHY 212 or 292 or permission of instructor 
Survey of modern computational chemistry methods, including 
molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics simulations, confor- 
mational searching, and computational quantum mechanics. 
(Spring) 

553 Advanced Organic Chemistry I (3:3) 

Pr. 352 
Advanced topics in organic chemistry with special emphasis on 
reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. (Fall) 

555 Organometallic Chemistry (2:2) 

Pr. 352, 442 
Theoretical and synthetic aspects of organometallic chemistry 
and applications to catalysis and synthetic organic chemistry. 
(Spring) 

556 Biochemistry I (3:3) 

Pr. 352, BIO 111-112 
Introductory biochemistry presented from a chemical perspec- 
tive. Topics include amino acids, proteins and enzymes, carbo- 
hydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, membranes, and carbohydrate 
catabolism. (Fall) 

557 Biochemistry II (3:3) 

Pr. 352, 556, BIO 111-112, or permission of instructor 
Continuation of CHE 556. Enzyme catalytic mechanisms, addi- 
tional topics in intermediary metabolism, genetic biochemistry, 
and selected topics in molecular physiology. (Spring) 

558 Biochemistry Laboratory (1:0:4) 

Pr. 556 or equivalent, 354, 333, or permission of instructor 
Introduction to biochemical techniques, including isolation, puri- 
fication and characterization of biological molecules. (Spring) 

570 Special Topics in Chemistry (1-3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for a maximum of six (6) semester hours when 
topic varies. 

• Hours per week and credit to be arranged. 

Study in special areas of chemistry as listed below. Areas 
identified as follows: 570A, Analytical; 570B, Biochemistry; 
570C, Inorganic; 570D, Organic; 570E, Physical; 570F, Chemi- 
cal Education. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional 
graduate-level courses. 



Chinese 



(see German and Russian) 



Department of 
Classical Studies 

including Classical Civilization, Greek, and Latin 

College of Arts & Sciences 

1 104 Moore Humanities and Research Administration 

336/334-5214 

www.uncg.edu/cla 

Faculty 

Susan C. Shelmerdine, Professor and Head of Department 

Professor Soles 

Associate Professors Parker, Wliarton 

Assistant Professors Heyn, Murphy, Zarecki 

Lecturers Danford, Muich 

Visiting Assistant Professor Simmons 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Classical Studies is to serve the 
educational interests of undergraduate and master's level students, 
the local and statewide community, and the health of the national 
discipline, by preserving, transmitting and interpreting the achieve- 
ments of the Classical World, and by adhering to the best practises of 
our discipline. 

The Department of Classical Studies provides a com- 
prehensive approach to the study of the ancient Greek and 
Roman world. The Department believes that students should 
have a solid foundation in the language, history, and culture 
of Greek and Roman civilization. To this end, the program is 
designed to ensure that all students gain proficiency in the 
Greek or Latin language, as well as a broad understanding of 
Classical literature in its cultural and historical context, the 
influence of Graeco-Roman civilization on the conceptions 
and values of Western civilization, and the methods of critical 
inquiry which are central to the discipline of Classical Stud- 
ies. 

The Department offers a wide variety of courses in Eng- 
lish on mythology, archaeology, literature and culture, as well 
as courses in ancient Greek and Latin at all levels. Courses 
with a CCI prefix require no knowledge of either language; 
GRK courses require reading of texts in Greek and LAT 
courses require reading of texts in Latin. 

Students also have an opportunity in the summer to visit 
Athens, Rome, and other parts of the Classical world, to par- 
ticipate in archaeological excavation, and to earn semester 
hours of credit through CCI 393, 394, 401, or 450; GRK 393, 
394; LAT 393, 394; or through Study Abroad Programs. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



155 



Classical Studies 



Classical Studies Major (CLAS) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Classical Language and Literature, U357 
Classical Civilization, U354 
Classical Archaeology, U352 

Classical Studies Major with Secondary Subject-Area 
Teacher Licensure in Latin, U129 

The Department offers a B.A. in Classical Studies, with 
three distinct concentrations in Classical Language and Lit- 
erature, Classical Civilization, and Classical Archaeology. 
All three concentrations offer a broad liberal arts experience 
that provides an excellent foundation for a variety of careers 
including law, business, government, journalism, and teach- 
ing. 

The Classical Language and Literature concentration is 
designed to ensure a solid preparation in the chosen language 
and to acquaint students with those works that form the origin 
of European literature, history, and philosophy. This concen- 
tration prepares students for graduate work in the Classical 
languages and literature and for secondary school language 
teaching. 

The Classical Civilization and Classical Archaeology 
concentrations provide a solid and wide-ranging background 
for understanding the origin and development of our West- 
ern ideas, values, languages, institutions, attitudes, and art. 
The Classical Civilization concentration is an excellent major 
for pre-law students, who should choose courses on Roman 
Civilization (CCI 202), Roman Law and Society (CCI 350), and 
Latin to fulfill major requirements. It is also an excellent sec- 
ond major for those interested in any area of primary or sec- 
ondary school teaching. The Classical Archaeology concen- 
tration is intended especially for students wishing to pursue 
graduate work in Classical Archaeology. Students interested 
in other areas of archaeology should also consider the Special 
Program in Liberal Studies in Archaeology. 

Classical Studies Courses Meeting General Education 
Core Requirements (GEO and College of Arts and 
Sciences Additional Requirements (CAR) 
Fine Arts (GFA) 

CCI 306, 312 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 
(GHP/GPM) 

CCI 201, 202, 211, 212, 240 
Literature (GLT) 

CCI 227, 228, 305, 324, 325, 326 
Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives (GPR) 

CCI 205, 321, 340, 350 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 

CCI 102 
Social and Behavioral Science (GSB) 

CCI 207 
College Foreign Language Requirements (GFL) 

GRK 203, 204; LAT 203, 204 



In addition, most CCI, GRK and LAT courses carry GL 
marker credit. CCI 312 carries GN marker credit. 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Department specifies courses for: 
Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

required for Classical Studies Teacher Licensure: 
CCI 205. 

For all other concentrations, student may select. 
One additional GLT course 3 

required for all concentrations (student may select) 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

required for Classical Language and Literature: 
CCI 201 or 202 

required for Classical Archaeology: CCI 211 or 212 

required for Classical Civilization: CCI 201 or 202 

required for Classical Studies Teacher Licensure: 
CCI 202 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

required for Classical Studies Teacher Licensure: 
HE A 201. 

For all other concentrations, student may select. 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 
Department specifies courses for: 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

Required: 6 s.h. in the same foreign language: GRK 203 
and 204, or LAT 203 and 204; one CCI course carrying 
the GL or GN marker; and one additional GL/GN course 
selected by student. At least one course must carry the 
GN marker. 
One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 



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One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 

programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

one GMO course 
Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

required: intermediate-level proficiency in one 
language, demonstrated by placement test 
or by completing course work through course 
number 204: 

required for Classical Language and 

Literature: GRK or LAT 204 
required for Classical Archaeology: 

GRK or LAT 204 
required for Classical Civilization: 

GRK or LAT 204 
required for Classical Studies Teacher 
Licensure: LAT 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 
a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

Minimum 30 semester hours distributed as follows in one 
of the three (3) possible concentrations. Students must have at 
least a 2.0 GPA for courses in the major, and nine (9) hours at 
the 300 level or above, with three (3) hours in an advanced 
seminar (400 level or above). No more than 6 s.h. in CCI 401 
and/or CCI 450 may be counted toward the major in Classical 
Studies. 

Classical Language and Literature 

1. 6 s.h. in core courses: CCI 201, 202 

2. 12 s.h. in one language 

Greek— must include at least one course at or above 
the 300 level 

Latin— must include at least three (3) courses at or 
above the 300 level 

3. 3 s.h. in material culture chosen from CCI 211, 212, 312, 
313, 314, 360, 365, 475, 512 

4. 6 s.h. in literature in translation chosen from CCI 205, 
227, 228, 305, 306, 321, 324, 325, 326, 405, 407, 502 

5. 3 s.h. in a related field chosen from CCI 206, 240, 323, 
336, 340, 350, 351, 353, 354, 355, 401, 450, 490, or one of 
the above categories 

Classical Civilization 

1. 6 s.h. in core courses: CCI 201, 202 

2. 3 s.h. in either Greek or Latin at or above the 204 level 

3. 3 s.h. in material culture chosen from CCI 211, 212, 312, 
313, 314, 360, 365, 475, 512 



4. 9 s.h. in literature in translation chosen from CCI 205, 
227, 228, 305, 306, 321, 324, 325, 326, 405, 407, 502 

5. 9 s.h. in a related field chosen from CCI 206, 240, 323, 
330, 336, 340, 350, 351, 353, 354, 355, 401, 450, 490, or one 
of the above categories 

Classical Archaeology 

1. 6 s.h. in core courses: CCI 211, 212 

2. 3 s.h. in either Greek or Latin at or above the 204 level 

3. 9 s.h. in material culture chosen from CCI 312, 313, 314, 
360, 365, 475, 512 

4. 3 s.h. in literature in translation chosen from CCI 205, 
227, 228, 305, 306, 321, 324, 325, 326, 405, 407, 502 

5. 9 s.h. in a related field chosen from CCI 206, 240, 323, 
330, 336, 340, 350, 351, 353, 354, 355, 401, 450, 490, or one 
of the above categories 

V Related Area Requirements 

No specific courses required. 

VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

Honors in Classical Studies 
Requirements 

• 12 s.h. of Honors work in CCI, GRK, and/or LAT courses 
above the 100 level with at least six (6) s.h. at the 300 
level or above and grades of at least a B (3.0) 

• 3 s.h. of HSS 490: Senior Honors Project with a grade of 
at least a B (3.0) 

Qualifications 

• A grade of at least 3.0 in all work used to satisfy the 
Honors requirements in Classical Studies 

• A declared Classical Studies primary major 

• A UNCG GPA of 3.30 or higher at graduation 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in 
Classical Studies" and the title of the Senior Honors Project 
will be printed on the student's official transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

See the department head for further information and 
guidance about Honors in Classical Studies. 

Classical Studies Minor 

Required: minimum of 15 semester hours 

AOSCode: U350 

The Classical Studies Minor complements majors in a 
variety of fields including anthropology, art, English, foreign 
languages, history, philosophy, and religious studies. Require- 
ments are flexible enough to permit students to develop and 
extend their major plan of study. 

The minor consists of 15 semester hours in courses above 
the 100 level to be worked out with the department advisor as 
best suited to each student's academic program. 



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Classical Studies Major with High School 
Teaching Licensure in Latin (CLAS) 
AOSCode: U129 

The Department of Classical Studies cooperates with the 
School of Education to prepare students for teaching Latin at 
the secondary level. The aim of the departmental program is 
three-fold: 

1 . To promote proficiency in Latin by providing 
courses which focus on grammatical analysis and 
reading of Latin texts with understanding, and 
which cover a range of genres and authors; 

2. To make available a full variety of courses in litera- 
ture, civilization, and advanced language training 
to ensure students a broad base of cultural and 
linguistic experiences; 

3. To promote an understanding of and appreciation 
for the Classical foundations of the Western tradi- 
tion. 

Requirements 

Minimum of 33 semester hours distributed as follows, 
with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Latin (LAT) courses, and 9 
hours at the 300 level or above, with three (3) hours in an 
advanced seminar (400 level or above): 

1. 6 s.h. in core courses: CCI 201, 202* 

2. 12 s.h. in Latin language with at least 9 s.h. (three 
courses) at the 300 level or above 

3. 3 s.h. in LAT 531, Latin Grammar and Composition 

4. 3 s.h. in material culture chosen from CCI 212, 312, 
314, 360, 365, 475, 512 

5. CCI 205*, and 3 additional s.h. in literature in trans- 
lation chosen from CCI 227, 228, 305, 306, 324, 325, 
326, 405, 407, 502 

6. 3 s.h. in a related field chosen from: 

CCI 206, 240, 323, 330, 336, 340, 350, 351, 353, 354, 
355, 490, or one of the above categories 
*CC1 201 and 202 satisfy GHP/GPM; CCI 205 satisfies GPR. 

In addition, students must meet additional requirements 
in General and Professional Education (see Teacher Educa- 
tion). For further information concerning these requirements 
students should consult with their advisor from the Depart- 
ment of Classical Studies. 

Classical Studies as a Second Academic 

Concentration for Elementary Education 

Majors 

Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

AOSCode: U130 

This concentration is designed for students in the Ele- 
mentary Education and Special Education programs. Much of 
the subject matter in the concentration (mythology, language 
and reading study, word origins, history, and culture) is easily 
adaptable for use with elementary grades students, and the 
flexibility of the concentration is designed to accommodate 
the schedules of Elementary Education and Special Education 
majors. 



Latin Focus 

1. LAT 101, 102 Elementary Latin, 6 s.h., or LAT 140* 
Elementary Latin Review, 3 s.h. 

*by placement exam or permission of the instructor 

2. CCI 202 Introduction to Classical Civilization: The 
Romans, 3 s.h. 

3. CCI 205 Mythology, 3 s.h. 

4. 6-9 s.h. in civilization courses selected from: 

CCI 206, 212, 227, 228, 305, 306, 314, 324, 326, 330, 340, 

350, 354, 355, 405, 407 

Greek Focus 

1 . GRK 201, 202 Elementary Greek, 6 s.h. 

2. CCI 201 Introduction to Classical Civilization: The 
Greeks, 3 s.h. 

3. CCI 205 Mythology, 3 s.h. 

4. 6 s.h. in civilization courses selected from: 

CCI 206, 211, 227, 228, 305, 306, 314, 323, 326, 330, 340, 

351, 353, 405, 407 

Classical Civilization Courses (CCI) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses in English Translation; 
no knowledge of Greek or Latin required. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

102 The Classical Art of Persuasion (3:3) 

GECore: GRD GE Marker: GL 

Introduction to Greek and Roman rhetoric. Study of selected 
speeches in their ancient contexts (law courts, funerals, politics) 
and early views on the art and power of persuasion. 

Ill Introduction to Linguistics (3:3) 

Introductory study of the science of language: principles of 
sound, meaning, structure, use, and the interactions of language 
and society. (Fall) (Same as ENG 111 and LIN 111) 

201 Introduction to Greek Civilization (3:3) 

GE Core: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GPM 

Introduction to Greek civilization from its beginnings to the Hel- 
lenistic age. Lectures and discussion will focus on the develop- 
ment of Greek literature, thought, and art in the context of soci- 
ety. 

202 Introduction to Roman Civilization (3:3) 
GECore: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GPM 

Introduction to Roman civilization from its beginnings to the 
Roman Empire. Lectures and discussion will focus on the devel- 
opment of Roman literature, thought, and art in the context of 
society. 

205 Mythology (3:3) 

GECore: GPR GE Marker: GL 

Great myths of the world with emphasis on Greek and Roman 
mythology. Discussion of literary and artistic representations, 
religious, philosophical and ethical traditions, and different theo- 
ries of myth. 

206 Classical Origins of the English Language (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Analysis of Greek and Latin prefixes, stems, and suffixes used 
in English. Emphasis on the history of beliefs, institutions, and 
traditions reflected in the Greek and Latin elements. 



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207 Ancient Sports and Society (3:3) 

GECore: GSB GE Marker: GL 

Survey of the ancient Olympics and local games of Greece and 
the gladiatorial sports of the Roman world, with special atten- 
tion to sociopolitical, economic, and religious impact of sporting 
behaviors. (Spring) 

211 Introduction to Greek Archaeology (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GPM 

Archaeological consideration of the Mycenaean, Archaic, Classi- 
cal, and Hellenistic periods of Greek civilization. 

212 Introduction to Roman Archaeology (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GPM 

Introduction to the archaeology of the Roman world, with par- 
ticular emphasis on Rome and the monumental remains of its 
vast empire. 

227 Comparative Studies in World Epics (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Major world epics in translation including the following works in 
whole or in part: Gilgamesh, Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, Chanson de 
Roland, Divine Comedy, Jerusalem Delivered, Beowulf, Joyce's 
Ulysses. 

228 Comparative Studies in World Drama (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Greek, Latin, and modern plays in translation: representative 
plays from Aeschylus through Euripides, Seneca, Terence, Racine, 
O'Neill, Cocteau, Anouilh, et al. 

240 Ancient Warfare (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GPM 

Survey of ancient warfare covering major battles, generals, strat- 
egy, tactics, weapons, and technology from the ancient Near East 
through the Roman Empire. (Alt Fall) 

305 Classical Tragedy (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Study of Greek tragedians of Athens in the fifth century and their 
subsequent influence on later literature. Readings from Aeschy- 
lus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca. 

306 Classical Comedy (3:3) 

GECore: GFA GE Marker: GL 

Study of Greek comedy in the fifth and fourth centuries and its 
subsequent influence on later literature. Readings from Aristo- 
phanes, Menander, Terence, and Plautus. 

312 The Art and Archaeology of Egypt (3:3) 

GECore: GFA GE Marker: GN 

Pr. CC12U or CCI 212 or ATY 258 
Introduction to the archaeology of Egypt, emphasizing the rela- 
tions between Egypt and the Aegean in the Bronze Age. 

313 Archaeology of the Aegean (3:3) 

Introduction to the Minoans and Mycenaeans. The archaeology 
of the Aegean Islands, Crete, the coast of Asia Minor, including 
Troy, and the mainland of Greece in the Bronze Age. 

314 Ancient Cities (3:3) 

Introduction to the great cities of the past, emphasizing the phys- 
ical design of those cities, especially as it reflects changing politi- 
cal and social structures. 

321 The Archaic Age (3:3) 

GE Core: GPR GE Marker: GL 

Study of the Greek Archaic period, from the end of the Homeric 
Age to the dawn of the Classical era. Focus on literature, art, and 
religion within their social context. 



323 The World of Alexander the Great (3:3) 

Pr. CCI 201 or CCI 211 or permission of instructor 
An introduction to the Hellenistic period of Greek civilization, 
emphasizing its art and architecture, its religion and literature in 
their historical context. 

324 The Age of Cicero (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Introduction to Roman literature and society in the first century 
b.c. Focus on the development of the genres of Latin literature 
and the relationship between politics and literature. 

325 The Age of Augustus (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Introduction to Roman literature and society during the reign of 
Augustus. Focus on the development of Latin epic poetry, histori- 
cal writing, and elegy, and the relationship between authors and 
Emperor. 

326 The Age of Nero (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Introduction to Roman literature and society during the reign of 
Nero and his successors. Focus on readings that reflect changes in 
the Roman Empire of the first and second centuries. 

330 Women in Antiquity (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. CCI 201, 202, or 205 
Public and private lives of Greek and Roman women of the Clas- 
sical Period, focusing on women's political, religious, and domes- 
tic roles, their general social status, health and welfare. 

336 Language Change (3:3) 

Pr. LIN 111, ENG 111, or ATY 387, or permission of instructor 
What makes languages change and how does language change 
affect individuals and societies? Survey of the empirical study of 
language change, with insights drawn from linguistics, sociolin- 
guistics, and anthropology. (Same as LIN 336) 

340 Ancient Cosmology (3:3) 

GECore: GPR GE Marker: GL 

Survey of ancient theories of the origins and configuration of the 
universe. Focus on Greek and Roman philosophical accounts, 
with some attention to Old Testament and Babylonian creation 
narratives. 

350 Roman Law and Society (3:3) 

GECore: GPR GE Marker: GL 

Pr. CCI 202 or CCI 324 or permission of instructor 
Exploration of major concepts and principles of Roman law and 
the society in which they developed, primarily through the study 
of cases from the writings by Roman jurists. 

351 History of Greece, 2000 B.C.- 31 B.C. (3:3) 

Mycenaean society, Greek "dark ages," colonization and tyranny, 
Athens and Sparta, flowering in the fifth and fourth centuries, 
conquests of Alexander, Hellenistic empires, and the diffusion of 
Greek civilization. (Same as HIS 351) 

353 Athens in the Fifth Century B.C. (3:3) 

Pr. 220 or 351 or permission of instructor 
Study of the social and political history of Athens in the fifth cen- 
tury b.c. (Same as HIS 353) 

354 The Roman Republic, 754 B.C.^4 B.C. (3:3) 

Study of the social and political forces that led to Rome's conquest 
of the Mediterranean World and of the transformation which 
world conquest wrought on Rome itself. Topics covered include: 
the Roman Constitution and politics, the Roman conquest of 
Italy and then of the whole Mediterranean, and the decline of the 
Republic. (Same as HIS 354) 



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355 The Roman Empire, 44 B.C.-A.D. 337 (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Survey of politics and society at Rome under the Empire, when 
Rome dominated Western Civilization. Topics covered include: 
Augustus and the rise of one-man rule at Rome, the long "Roman 
Peace" and the civilizing of Europe under the Emperors, the rise 
of Christianity, and the transformed Empire of Constantine the 
Great. (Same as HIS 355) 

360 Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Britain and Gaul 
(3:3) 

Pr. CCI212 or permission of instructor 
Archaeological study of provinces of Gaul and Britain. Following 
in the footsteps of Julius Caesar to look at how incorporation into 
the empire changed the lives of the Celtic "barbarians." (Occ) 

365 Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Asia Minor and 
Syria (3:3) 

Pr. CCI 212 or permission of instructor 
Archaeological study of Asia Minor and Syria, a region at the 
crossroads between East and West. Focus on the impact of the 
Roman Empire on Eastern culture and society. (Occ) 

370 Classical Rhetoric and Culture (3:3) 

Pr. CCI 102 or 201 or 202 or permission of instructor 
Exploration and analysis of the role and importance of rhetoric 
and oratory in the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman 
world. Authors studied include Homer, Plato, Cicero, and Augus- 
tine. (Occ) 

389 Experimental Course: Women in Classical Drama (3:3) 
Examination of several Greek and Roman plays (tragedies and 
comedies) and performance techniques to understand women's 
presentation on the public stage as models and countermodels of 
conventional social mores. (Offered spring '05) 

393, 394 Classical Studies Abroad (3:3), (3:3) 

Pr. permission of department 
Extensive reading in Greek and Latin literature in translation, 
ancient history and archaeology, selected in accordance with 
student needs. For students participating in foreign study pro- 
grams. 

401 Archaeological Practicum (1-3) 

• May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h. 

Participation in pre-approved archaeological work and opportu- 
nity to learn the field methods of classical archaeology firsthand. 

405 Advanced Studies in Mythology (3:3) 

Pr. CCI 205 or permission of the instructor 
Study of selected myths from Greece, Rome, and comparative 
cultures. Focus on original literature, supplemented by ancient 
and modern critical works. Topics will vary; see description for 
each term. 

407 Roman Myth and Legend (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. CCI 205 
Examination of the myths and legends of ancient Rome and their 
connection to the history of Roman political and religious life. 
(Occ) 

450 Internship in Classical Studies (1-6) 

Pr. permission of department head 

• May be repeated once, for a maximum of 6 semester hours credit. 
Supervised field experience in museums or institutes devoted to 
the study of Ancient Greece or Rome and/or visitation of classi- 
cal sites. 



475 Archaeology of Death in the Classical World (3:3) 

Pr. CCI 211 or 212 or ATY 258 or 360 
Survey of archaeological evidence for funerary customs and 
beliefs in the Bronze Age Aegean, Classical Greece, and Rome, 
with a study of comparative evidence from other ancient and 
modern cultures. (Alt) 

490 Seminar in Classical Studies (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic changes 

Seminar on the history and methodologies of scholarship in Clas- 
sical Studies. Topics will vary. (Alt) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

501 Independent Study (1-3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit for up to six (6) semester hours. 
Directed program of reading, research, and individual instruc- 
tion in Classical Studies. 

502 History of Latin Literature (3:3) 
Pr. permission of instructor 

A survey of Latin literature in English translation from the third 
century b.c to the beginnings of the Middle Ages. 

512 The Archaeology of Roman Daily Life (3:3) 

Study of Roman daily life and the evidence from archaeology and 
ancient literature for daily life. 

541 Ancient World: Selected Topics (3:3) 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 

Varying topics in ancient Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman his- 
tory, including politics and public rituals, patterns of social orga- 
nization, ancient slavery, and cross-cultural interactions. (Same 
as HIS 541) 

550 Selected Topics in Classical Studies (3:3) 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 

Varying topics in Greek and/or Roman literature, archaeology, or 
culture, chosen according to the needs of the students. All read- 
ings in English translation. (Fall or Spring or Summer) 

Greek Courses (GRK) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses require the reading of texts in Greek. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

150 Applied Modern Greek (1:1) 

Pr. open to all students with instructor's permission 

• May be repeated for credit up to four (4) semester hours. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

• Will not satisfy foreign language requirement. 
Training in spoken demotic Greek. 

201 Elementary Ancient Greek I (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Introduction to ancient Greek. Emphasis on understanding 
principles of grammar and developing skills for reading ancient 
Greek. (Fall) 



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202 Elementary Ancient Greek II (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 201 
Continuation of GRK 201. Emphasis on advanced grammar and 
reading of selections from ancient Greek authors (e.g., Euripides, 
Xenophon, Plato, New Testament). (Spring) 

203 Intermediate Ancient Greek I (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL CAR: GFL 

Pr. 202 
Designed to develop proficiency in the reading of ancient Greek 
prose and to introduce students to Greek prose authors. Plato 
and Lysias/Herodotus (or another historian) taught in alternate 
years. (Fall) 

204 Intermediate Ancient Greek II (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL CAR: GFL 

Pr. 203 
Continuation of GRK 203. Designed to develop proficiency in 
reading ancient Greek poetry and to introduce students to Greek 
poets. Greek tragedy/Homer taught in alternate years. (Spring) 

303, 304 Greek Drama (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selected works of Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristo- 
phanes. 

311 The Greek Orators (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from the works of Greek orators; emphasis on Anti- 
phon, Lysias, Isocrates, and Demosthenes. 

312, 313 Greek Historical Writers (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from the works of the Greek historians; emphasis on 
Herodotus and Thucydides. 

331 The New Testament (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of the instructor 
Selections from the New Testament. 

341 Homer (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from Iliad and Odyssey. 

350, 351 Special Topics in Greek Studies (3:3), (3:3) 

Pr. 203, 204. Student should consult instructor before registering 
for course. 
Opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups 
on problems of special interest in Greek literature or language. 
Work may represent either survey of a given field or intensive 
investigation of particular problem. 

393, 394 The Study of Greek Abroad (3:3), (3:3) 

Pr. 204 and permission of department 
Extensive reading in Greek literature selected in accordance with 
student needs. For students participating in foreign study pro- 
grams. 

401 The Greek Epic (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from the works of Homer, Hesiod, and Apollonius of 
Rhodes. 



403 Greek Lyric Poetry (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Survey of Greek lyric poetry with emphasis on Sappho and 
Alcaeus; the pastoral poetry of Theocritus, Bion, and Moschus. 

405 Hellenistic Poetry (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from Hellenistic poetry; emphasis on Callimachus and 
Theocritus. 

421 The Greek Philosophers (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, and representa- 
tives of the Hellenistic schools. 

450 Seminar in Greek Studies (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Extensive reading in literature of the Classics selected in accor- 
dance with student needs. Periodic conferences, written reports, 
and quizzes throughout the semester. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

501 Independent Study (1-3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for up to six (6) semester hours. 

Directed program of reading, research, and individual instruc- 
tion in Greek language and literature. 

550 Topics in Greek Studies (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 

Studies in selected topics in Greek literature or language, e.g., the 
development of a genre, the nature of a period in literary history, 
or the treatment of a particular theme. 

Latin Courses (LAT) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses require the reading of texts in Latin. 

Students who have a background in high school Latin must 

take the Latin placement exam before registering for any 

Latin courses. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

101 Elementary Latin I (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Introduction to Latin. Emphasis on understanding principles of 
grammar and developing skills for reading Latin. (Fall) 

102 Elementary Latin II (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 101 or appropriate score on the Latin placement exam 
Continuation of LAT 101. Emphasis on advanced grammar and 
selected readings. (Spring) 

140 Elementary Latin Review (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Accelerated elementary curriculum for students with previous 
Latin experience or a demonstrable aptitude for second-language 
acquisition. (Fall) 



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198 Latin Sight Reading (1:1) 

Pr. LAT 203 

• May be repeated once for credit 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Sight reading of Latin texts from all periods of Latin literature. 
Does not count toward the language requirements of the College 
of Arts and Sciences or the Classical Studies major. (Alt) 

199 Conversational and Modern Latin (1:1) 

Pr. LAT 102 or 140 or permission of instructor 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Practice in Latin conversation, supplemented by readings and 
informal exercises. Does not count toward the language require- 
ments of the College of Arts and Sciences or the Classical Studies 
major. (Occ) 

203 Intermediate Latin I (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL CAR: GPL 

Pr. a grade ofC- or better in LAT 102 or 140, or appropriate score 
on the Latin placement exam, or permission of instructor 
Designed to develop proficiency in reading of Latin and intro- 
duce students to Latin prose and poetry. 

204 Intermediate Latin II (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL CAR: GPL 

Pr. LAT 203, or appropriate score on the Latin placement exam, or 
permission of instructor 
Study of Latin prose and poetry with continued emphasis on 
developing proficiency in reading Latin. 

301 Roman Lyric Poetry (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from the poetry of Catullus and Horace. 

302 Roman Letters and Men of Letters (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from the letters of Cicero, Pliny, and Seneca. 

303 Roman Drama (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from Plaurus, Terence, and Seneca. 

311 The Roman Orators (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from the speeches and rhetorical works of Cicero and 
of other Roman orators. 

312 Roman Historians (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from Julius Caesar, Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus. 

321 Roman Satire (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selected satires of Horace and Juvenal. 

350, 351 Special Topics in Latin Literature (3:3), (3:3) 

Pr. 204. Student should consult instructor before registering for 
course. 
Opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups 
on problems of special interest in Latin literature or language. 
Work may represent either survey of a given field or intensive 
investigation of particular problem. 



393, 394 The Study of Latin Abroad (3:3), (3:3) 

Pr. 204 and permission of department 
Extensive reading in Latin literature selected in accordance with 
student needs. For students participating in foreign study pro- 
grams. 

400 Intensive Reading of Latin (3:3) 

Pr. permission of the instructor 
Systematic review of Latin grammar and intensive reading of 
selected authors intended to prepare students for further work 
in Latin. 

401 Vergil (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Vergil's Aeneid VII-XII; reading from the Eclogues and Geor- 
gics. 

402 Ovid (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selected readings from Ovid's Metamorphoses, Amores, and 
Fasti. 

405 Poetry in the Age of Augustus (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Survey of Latin literature from 40 b.c. to a.d. 14; selections from 
Vergil, Horace, the elegiac poets, and Ovid. 

421 Roman Philosophical Writings (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Selections from essays of Cicero, De Rerum Natura of Lucretius, 
and essays of Seneca. 

450 Seminar in Latin Studies (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Extensive readings in literature of the Classics selected in accor- 
dance with student needs. Periodic conferences, written reports, 
and quizzes throughout the semester. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 22 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

501 Independent Study (1-3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for up to six (6) semester hours. 

Directed program of readings, research, and individual instruc- 
tion in Latin language. 

531 Latin Grammar and Composition (3:3) 

Pr. 204, or permission of instructor 
Intensive study of Latin grammar, syntax, and prose style; 
includes reading of Latin texts and translation into Latin from 
English. Required for initial licensure in Latin. (Formerly LAT 
431) 

550 Topics in Latin Studies (3:3) 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 

Studies in selected topics in Latin literature or languages, e.g., the 
development of a genre, the nature of a period in literary history, 
or the treatment of a particular theme. 



162 



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552 Teaching Secondary-Level Latin: Current Trends (3:3) 

Pr. admission to the Standard Professional I License or M.Ed, in 
Latin program, or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 

• This course does not fulfill Latin language major requirements. 
Trends and issues in teaching Latin at the secondary level. Top- 
ics include: review of textbooks, use of technology, research on 
second language acquisition, reaching diverse learners, and other 
current issues. 

571 Medieval and Renaissance Latin (3:3) 

Pr. permission of the instructor 
Selections from Medieval and Renaissance prose and poetry. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



Department of Communication 
Sciences & Disorders 

School of Health & Human Performance 

300 Ferguson Building 

336/334-5184 

www.uncg.edu/csd 

Faculty 

Robert Mayo, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Hooper, Kamhi 

Associate Professors Hinton, Lundgren, Nwokah, Phillips, Tucker 

Academic Professional Professor McCready 

Academic Professional Associate Professors Campbell, Fh/mi, 

Mankoff, Raleigh 
Academic Professional Assistant Professors Crutchley, Edwards, 

Fox-Thomas, McDonald, Ramsey 
Adjunct Associate Professor Butler 
Adjunct Assistant Professors Barrie-Blackley, Blalock, Delagrange, 

Frank 

Mission Statement 

The Mission of the Department of Communication Sciences 
and Disorders is to prepare students with a background in speech, 
language, and hearing sciences, and in speech, language, and hearing 
disorders in anticipation of their continued studies at the graduate 
level. 



Speech Pathology and Audiology Major 

(SPAU) 

Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U143 

The Speech Pathology and Audiology Major provides 
a preprofessional program for those preparing for graduate 
study in speech-language pathology or audiology. The major 
is designed to satisfy some requirements for the N.C. license 
in Speech-Language Pathology or Audiology, although no 
license is awarded until completion of the master's degree in 



speech language pathology and the Au.D. or Ph.D. in audiol- 
ogy. Instruction is designed to meet American Speech-Lan- 
guage-Hearing Association standards. Transfer students may 
require an additional semester to complete the undergradu- 
ate degree program. 

Student Learning Goals 

Students majoring in Speech Pathology and Audiology 
will be able to: 

Identify the foundations of normal communication 
(speech, language, hearing). 

Explain the theories and processes involved in the 
identification and evaluation of communication 
disorders. 

Identify disorders of receptive and expressive writ- 
ten and oral language (phonology, morphology, 
syntax, semantics, and pragmatics). 
Identify disorders of speech production (articula- 
tion, voice, and fluency). 

Describe the cognitive and social aspects of com- 
munication. 

Relate issues of cultural diversity to communication 
and its disorders. 

Explain relationships of hearing and hearing dis- 
orders to speech and language development and 
disorders. 

Analyze and measure hearing function. 
Describe habilitation and rehabilitation of individu- 
als with hearing impairment. 

Admission Requirements 

a. Students must be formally admitted to the Speech 
Pathology and Audiology Major. Only students with 
a written acceptance will be permitted to enroll in 
required courses at the 300 level or above. 

b. Applicants for admission to the Speech Pathology and 
Audiology major may apply only after completion and/ 
or transfer of 55 semester hours and must apply before 
enrollment in any required courses at or above the 300 
level in the major. Applicants must have an overall 
grade point average of at least 3.0 to be admitted to the 
major. 

c. The grade point average (see b. above) is a minimum 
requirement and simple compliance does not automati- 
cally imply admission. In all cases, admission is com- 
petitive and limited by space available in the program. 

d. Students seeking admission to the Speech Pathology 
and Audiology Major should proceed as follows: 

(1) Secure an official transcript(s) of undergraduate 
course work completed at colleges and universities 
other than UNCG, and an unofficial transcript from 
UNCG; 

(2) Secure an application from the Communication Sci- 
ences and Disorders Program Office, 300 Ferguson 
Building, or online at www.uncg.edu/csd/ugapp. 
htm; 

(3) Deliver both the transcripts and the completed 
application to the Program Office, 300 Ferguson 
Building, by May 31. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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Communication Sciences & Disorders 



(4) In some cases the Program may require additional 
information or an interview, so the application pro- 
cess should be initiated immediately after comple- 
tion of 55 hours. 

Criteria for Continuing in the Speech Pathology 
and Audiology Major 

Failure to meet these criteria will result in dismissal from 
the major and loss of approval to graduate. 

a. Maintenance of a minimum overall grade point average 
of 3.0 

b. Minimum grade point average of 3.0 in major courses, 
with no grades in these courses below C- 

c. Demonstration of high quality oral and written commu- 
nication 

d. Compliance with all University regulations including 
the Academic Integrity Policy 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Department specifies courses for: 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Required: PSY 121 and one other GSB course 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Department specifies courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

6 s.h. of a foreign language through the 102 level, and 
two additional GL/GN courses, one of which must carry 
the GN marker 

Students may select courses for: 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 



One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 

programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

Ill Major Requirements 

Minimum 27 semester hours above the 100 level. 

a. All majors are required to take: 

• CSD 295, 306, 307, 308, 309, 334, 336, 337, 476, 556 or 
557, and 588; STA 108, or MAT 115 or higher; PSY 
121*; SES 101. CSD 464 recommended. 

• one additional GSB course (in addition to the 6 s.h. 
required by GEC) from the list in chapter 5 

• one additional GNS course from the list in chapter 5 
(in addition to the 6-7 s.h. required by GEC) 

• 6 s.h. of a foreign language through the 102 level* 
*PSY 121 satisfies one GSB; six (6) semester hours of a foreign 
language satisfy two GL requirements. 

b. Students preparing for graduate study in speech-lan- 
guage pathology are required to take: CSD 338, and 550 

c. Students preparing for graduate study in audiology are 
required to take: STA 108 and ISM 110 

Honors in Communication Sciences and 

Disorders 

Requirements 

1. Admission to Lloyd International Honors College 

2. Completion of Senior Honors Project, CSD 490, 3 s.h. 

3. Nine (9) s.h. of 300-level or higher course work in CSD 
to be completed through CSD 493 and/or Honors Con- 
tracts from any of the following: CSD 333, 464, 495, 551, 
556 or 557 (if not taken as a major requirement), and/or 
571 (Honors clinic) 

Qualifications 

• A grade of B or higher in all CSD course work 

• 3.30 or higher overall GPA at graduation 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in 
Communication Sciences and Disorders" and the title of the 
Senior Honors Project will be printed on the student's official 
transcript. 

Communication Sciences and Disorders Courses 
(CSD) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

150 Communication Disabilities in Film (3:2:3) 

Popular films and their portrayal of individuals with various 
speech, language, or hearing problems; how that information 
promotes images that are positive and negative; and how those 
images influence public opinion. 

219 Communication Disorders Laboratory (1:0:2) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Supervised therapy for students with speech, voice, language, or 
hearing problems. 



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250 Concepts in Communication Sciences (3:3) 

• For freshmen and sophomores. 

Concepts essential in understanding human communication; fac- 
tors affecting life-long development and competency of speech, 
language and hearing. 

295 Fundamentals of Speech and Language Analysis (3:3) 
Structural foundation and analytic tools for studying language 
disorders. 

306 Introduction to Phonetics (3:3) 

Pr. majors only, or by permission of instructor 

Coreq. must be taken concurrently with 307, 308, and 309. 

• Not open to freshmen or sophomores. 

Recording of speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet in 
broad transcription. General American dialects and variations. 

307 Speech and Hearing Science (3:3) 

Pr. majors only, or by permission of instructor 

Corea. must be taken concurrently with 306, 308, and 309. 

• Not open to freshmen or sophomores. 

Acoustic principles of speech and hearing; analysis of the acous- 
tic characteristics of speech and physiological correlates; speech 
perception. 

308 Language and Speech Development (3:3) 

Pr. majors only, or by permission of instructor 

Coreq. must be taken concurrently with 306, 307, and 309. 

• Students cannot receive credit for both this course and SES 240. 

• Not open to freshmen or sophomores. 

Theory and evidence of the chronological development of pho- 
nology syntax, semantics, and pragmatics in the child. 

309 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing 
Mechanism (3:3) 

Pr. majors only, or by permission of instructor 

Coreq. must be taken concurrently with 306, 307, and 308. 

• Not open to freshmen or sophomores. 

Anatomical and physiological bases of human communication. 

334 Introduction to Audiology (3:3) 

Pr.lCoreq. CSD 308, and either SES 240 or CSD 307; or permission 
of instructor 

• Speech Pathology/ Audiology and Professions in Deafness majors 
only 

Basic anatomy and physiology of the auditory system, funda- 
mental hearing science, and methods and techniques of hearing 
measurement and interpretation for the assessment, diagnosis, 
evaluation, and rehabilitation of hearing disorders. 

336 Articulation and Phonological Disorders Across the 
Life Span (3:3) 

Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, and 309, or permission of instructor 
Assessment and treatment procedures for a variety of articula- 
tion and phonological disorders across the life span. 

337 Language Disorders (3:3) 

Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, 309 
Nature, theory, measurement, and management of language 
problems across the life span. 

338 Voice and Fluency Disorders (3:3) 

Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, 309 
Basic theories and principles in the onset, development, and 
maintenance of stuttering and voice disorders in children and 
adults. Primary factors in prevention, measurement, assessment, 
and management. (Spring) 



464 Genetics and Communication Disorders (3:3) 

Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, 309, 334 
Fundamentals of embryology of the organs of communication, 
Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics including pedigrees, risk 
calculation, meiosis/mitosis, chromosomal abnormalities, genetic 
screening and counseling, environmental genomics, and disor- 
ders of communication. (Spring) 

476 Structured Clinic Observations (1:0:2) 

Pr. CSD 334, 336, and 337, or permission of instructor 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Guided clinical observations and experiences as a therapy assis- 
tant in the UNCG Speech and Hearing Center. (Fall & Spring) 

490 Senior Honors Project (3:3) 

Pr. senior status, admission to the Lloyd International Honors 
College and the CSD Honors Program, or permission of the 
instructor 

• May be repeated once for credit. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Independent original scholarship, completed under the supervi- 
sion of a faculty member. Culminates in an original oral presenta- 
tion, written document, or other creative work. (All) 

493 Honors Independent Study (3:3) 

Pr. senior status, admission to the Lloyd International Honors 
College and the CSD Honors Program, or permission of the 
instructor 

• May be repeated once for credit. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Directed study and/or research under faculty supervision. (All) 

495 Special Topics Seminar (1:1) 

Pr. CSD 334, 336, and 337, or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit twice during the senior year of UNCG 
undergraduates. Second degree students may enroll twice during 
the year they are taking undergraduate courses. 

Critical analysis of contemporary topics in Communication Sci- 
ences and Disorders. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

550 Diagnostic Procedures: Inquiry, Observation and 
Measurement (3:2:3) 

Pr. completion of all CSD 300-level courses required for the major or 
permission of the instructor 
Processes and techniques of data acquisition and analysis for the 
diagnosis, assessment, and evaluation of communication disor- 
ders. 

551 Speech and Language Disorders: Diagnostic 
Procedures (3:2:2) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Differential diagnosis of speech, language, voice, and rhythm 
problems. 

552 Communication and Aging (3:3) 

Pr. 308 or permission of instructor 
Development of communication in old age; factors affecting 
development and competency; communication evidence and the- 
ories of aging; facilitation of life-long functional communication. 

554 Advanced Speech Science (3:3) 

Pr. 306, 307, 308, 309 
Acoustic theory and methods of analysis; acoustic structure of 
speech and its physiological correlates; application of acoustic 
information to clinical management of disorders of communica- 
tion. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



165 



Communication Studies 



556 Aural Rehabilitation (3:3) 

Pr. 334 
Principles of aural rehabilitation with hearing impaired adults 
and their significant others. (Spring) 

557 Pediatric Aural Rehabilitation (3:3) 

Pr. CSD 334 for undergraduates; permission of instructor for 
graduate students 
Study of new technologies available for children with hearing 
impairment and the impact of these technologies on therapy and 
teaching. (Spring) 

571 Beginning Clinical Practice in Speech-Language 
Pathology (3:2:4) 

Pr. admission to the appropriate degree program or permission of 
instructor 

• Grade: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory, S/U 
Beginning clinical practice in diagnosis of and therapy for com- 
munication disorders. 

575 Instrumentation for Communication Disorders (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Instrumentation commonly used in communication disorders; 
operation and measurement techniques for clinical and research 
applications. 

588 Neurology of Speech, Language and Hearing (3:3) 

Pr. 309 or permission of instructor 
An overview of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with a con- 
centration on neurological mechanisms related to speech, lan- 
guage and hearing. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



Department of 
Communication Studies 

College of Arts & Sciences 

102 Ferguson Building 

336/334-5297 

www.uncg.edu/cst 

Facult\' 

P. M. Kellett, Associate Professor and Head of Department 
Professor Schwartzman 

Associate Professors Bracci, Carlone, Jovanovic, Natalie, Poulos 
Assistant Professors Kinefuchi, LeGreco 

Lecturers Cuny, F airfield- Artman, Ferguson, Manning, McCall, 
Steger, Yarragunta 

Mission Statement 

The power of voices, speaking to transform — We research, teach, 
and practice communication to cultivate the ethical voices of people 
that speak in critical, constructive, and transformative ways to 
identities, relationships, and communities. 



Philosophy of Scholarship 

We believe that communication is formative and founda- 
tional to human identities, relationships, and communities— 
and that ethical and strategically effective communication can 
be the means of critiquing, constructing, and transforming 
identities, relationships, and communities. 

We engage in communication scholarship in the form of 
research, teaching, and service that: 

• integrates dialogue and other approaches to com- 
munication as the foundation for scholarly inquiry 
and application to the world 

• cultivates diversity and respect for differences 

• promotes change that leads to more democratic, 
just, and peaceful relationships and communities 

• engages creative partnerships of faculty, students, 
and other stakeholders in addressing contemporary 
challenges and opportunities for improving com- 
munication 

Scholarly Focus Areas 

These beliefs and values are articulated in the following 
ongoing scholarly focus areas of the department: 

• Public Voice 

How can communication scholarship help us to 
understand and improve the quality of public dis- 
course in the world around us? 

• Voices of Change, Diversity and Difference, and 
Conflict 

How can communication scholarship help people 
to engage with diversity, differences, and divisions in 
ways that promote understanding and collaborative/ 
democratic change? 

• Voices of Identity and Relationships 

How can communication scholarship help us 
understand how people create and sustain desired 
identities and healthy relationships? 

• Voices of Discovery 

How can communication scholarship help us 
understand how people learn to co-construct, share, 
and critique knowledge? 

The Department offers the B.A. in Communication Stud- 
ies as well as an undergraduate minor. The M.A. degree is 
also offered in the department. For details on the graduate 
program see The Graduate School Bulletin. 

The Department of Communication Studies offers 
required and elective courses that are designed to make 
productive use of differing learning styles among students: 
theoretical and applied, textual and experiential, topical and 
case study, course work and internships/service learning, 
individual and groups/team based performances. A number 
of courses involve service learning to link communication, 
action, and academic study. 

The Department of Communication Studies provides 
opportunities to study relational, group, workplace, and 
community communication. Communication courses con- 
tribute to a liberal education by teaching creative thinking 
and problem-solving, critical reasoning, and effective oral, 
written, and mediated communication. The faculty strongly 
believe in the interdisciplinary nature of communication, and 
this curriculum encourages elective course work be taken in 



166 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Communication Studies 



allied disciplines such as African American Studies, Anthro- 
pology, Business, English, Media Studies, Philosophy, Politi- 
cal Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Women's and Gender 
Studies. Additionally the Department participates in Service- 
Learning, the Honors Programs administered by the Lloyd 
International Honors College, Writing Across the Curriculum 
and Speaking Across the Curriculum programs, and regu- 
larly offers freshman seminars. Opportunities also exist for 
Study Abroad including exchanges in Europe. Communica- 
tion Studies majors with a 3.0 GPA may apply to go abroad 
in the spring semester of their junior year to participate in the 
Interculrural Studies program at Vaxjo University in Vaxjo, 
Sweden. The program (taught in English) requires course 
work in socio-cultural theory, interculrural interactions, cul- 
tural analysis, and fieldwork, with optional study in basic 
Swedish. 

The undergraduate program in Communication Stud- 
ies is designed to serve as a solid foundation for a variety 
of professional and entrepreneurial careers; it also provides 
preparatory work for graduate studies in communication, 
as well as related fields such as law, business, media stud- 
ies, and education. Faculty and students in the Department 
of Communication Studies are actively involved in research, 
service, and consulting with community, state, regional, 
national, and international organizations and agencies. 

Student Learning Goals 

As a reflection of the mission statement, the UNCG gen- 
eral education goals, and in consultation with the National 
Communication Association, the Department of Communica- 
tion Studies has the following student learning outcomes for 
the B.A. degree. At the completion of the major, the student 
should be able to: 

• Speak effectively and ethically to a public. 

• Utilize communication concepts and competencies 
to build relationships and/or community. 

• Apply a communication perspective to identify and 
analyze social issues/problems. 

• Engage communication scholarship using appropri- 
ate theory and research methods. 

Criterion for Progression in the Major 

Only grades of C- or better, taken in Communication 
Studies courses, will count toward completion of a major in 
the Department. 

Communication Studies Major (CMST) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 1 22 semester hours, to include at least 36 hours 
at or above the 300 course level with a minimum of 6 
hours from this 36 at the 400 and/or 500 course levels; 
minimum 2.0 GPA 

AOSCode: U137 



Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 

One additional GLT course (student may select) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and CST 105 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



167 



Communication Studies 



IV Major Requirements (36 semester hours) 

1. 15 s.h. to include : 

CST 105*, 200, 207, 210, and 300 

2. 21 additional s.h. of CST electives at the 300 level or above, 
6 hours of which must be at the 400 and/or 500 level. 

*CST 105 fulfills three (3) semester hours ofGRD and serves as an 
SI course. 

V Related Area Requirements 

No specific courses are recommended. 

VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

Honors in Communication Studies 
Requirements 

For Honors requirements, check with the departmental 
office and see Honors Programs in this chapter. 

Communication Studies Minor 
Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

A minor in Communication Studies consists of CST 200, 
and at least 15 semester hours of additional courses in the 
Communication Studies Program. 

Communication Studies as a Second Academic 
Concentration for Elementary Education Majors 
Required: 18 semester hours 

1. Required core courses: 6 s.h. from either CST 105 or 200 
and either 311 or 305 

2. 12 s.h. from the following: CST 207, 210, 315, 344, 350, 599 

Communication Studies Courses (CST) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

105 Introduction to Communication Studies (3:3) 

GECore: GRD 
Introduction to the principles and skills for effective communica- 
tion in the contexts of public speaking, interpersonal communica- 
tion, and small group/team communication. Videotaping used to 
enhance personal growth. 

200 Communication and Community (3:3:1) 

Exploration of role and impact of communication in diverse com- 
munities. Ethical and social responsibilities of civic action are 
examined in the context of community problem solving. Includes 
service learning experience in a supervised setting. 

207 Relational Communication (3:3) 

Contemporary theory and practice of relational communication, 
with emphasis on increasing awareness of strategic and ethical 
uses of communication to build relationships. 

210 Communicating Ethically (3:3) 

Provides students with an opportunity to think critically about 
ethical and moral dimensions of current practices in interper- 
sonal, institutional, and public communication. 



300 Communication Theory (3:3) 

Pr. 105 and junior standing 
Critical analysis and evaluation of scientific, rhetorical, and criti- 
cal theories of communication. Emphasis on how theory assists 
us to understand, predict, and transform society. 

305 Persuasion in Western Culture (3:3) 

Pr. 105 and junior standing 
The history of rhetoric (persuasion) and its evolution in Western 
culture, from ancient Greece to our current age. Application of 
rhetorical theory/criticism to various historical and contempo- 
rary communicative events. 

308 Organizational Communication (3:3) 

Examines contemporary organizational communication theory 
and practices as they enable organizations to function, change, 
learn, and create/recreate identities. 

311 Deliberation and Decision Making (3:3) 

Course content explores the theory and practice of collaborative 
argumentation. This includes analysis and deliberation over con- 
temporary issues and training in reasoned, persuasive oral and 
written communications. (Fall) 

315 Persuasion and Social Influence (3:3) 

Theories and practices of persuasion in critically evaluating and 
creating/composing persuasive messages. Role of ethics in rela- 
tional, group, and mass mediated persuasive communication. 

333 Special Problems (1-3) 

Pr. permission of faculty supervisor 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Guided individual study in an area of special interest to the stu- 
dent. 

337 Intercultural Communication (3:3) 

Drawing from multiple theoretical perspectives, this course 
explores theories, research, and issues important to the under- 
standing of communication between people from different racial, 
ethnic, national, and other cultural backgrounds. (Fall) 

341 Communication and Workplace Relationships (3:3) 

Advanced communication skills applied to the workplace. 
Emphasis on both oral and written communication in interview- 
ing, making presentations, and creating ethically grounded pro- 
fessional communication. 

342 Communication and Public Relations (3:3) 

Prepares students for effective and ethical public communication 
on behalf of profit and not-for-profit organizations. Students cre- 
ate a research-based, values-driven, standing PR plan designed to 
meet organizational communication objectives. 

344 Conflict Communication (3:3) 

Course explores how communication is central to expressing 
opposing voices and managing conflicted relationships, change, 
diversity/difference, and identities. 
350 Small Group and Team Communication (3:3) 
Theory and practice of small group/team communication, empha- 
sizing student participation. Develops skills for leadership in 
small group/teams. Develops framework for analysis of effective 
small groups/teams. 



168 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Communication Studies 



390 Studies in Communication Across the Curriculum (3:3) 

Pr. CST 105 or 341 (may be taken as a corequisite); 3.0 GPA in the 
student's major; written permission from the Speaking Across the 
Curriculum Center Director 
Explores principles of Communication Across the Curriculum, 
applying them to interpersonal communication, listening, group 
communication, public speaking, and pedagogy to prepare Com- 
munication Consultants in UNCG's Speaking Intensive pro- 
gram. 

399 Communication Research Methods (3:3) 

Pr. 200, 207, 210, 300, 305 
Theoretical examination and practical application of the philo- 
sophical, ideological, and processual bases for selecting, using, 
and evaluating methods of conducting and reporting communi- 
cation research. 

412 Communication Internship (3-6) 

Pr. will vary; junior or senior status, and permission of instructor 

• Open to majors only. 

• May be repeated for maximum of six (6) semester hours. 

Field learning experience using communication theory, research, 
and strategies in agencies and organizations within the larger 
community. (Fall & Spring) 

415 Family Communication (3:3) 

Exploration of family communication, including symbols, mean- 
ings, rules, traditions, stories, secrets, roles, artifacts, and theo- 
retical frameworks. Practical application exercises and research 
related to family communication practices and patterns. (Fall) 

440 Reclaiming Democracy: Dialogue, Decision-Making, 
Community Action (3:3) 

This course asks: How do we reclaim our democracy as a 
humane, inclusive process responsible to the needs of all com- 
munity members and what does this require of us? (Alt Fall) 

460 Special Topics in Communication Research (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit an unlimited number of times when 
topics vary. 

Seminar in applying communication theory and research to cur- 
rent topics. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

499 Senior Project Seminar (3:3) 

Pr. senior status and permission of instructor 
"Capstone experience" for majors. Course explores the themes 
of strategies, ethics, relationships, and communities, in their aca- 
demic experience. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

502 The Semiotics of Everyday Life (3:3) 

Pr. graduate status or permission of instructor 
Language, meaning, and sign systems as communication pro- 
cess. Emphasis on projects to apply theoretical concepts from 
general semantics and semiotics to promote understanding of 
how humans symbolically construct reality. 

506 Speaking Out for Community Change (3:3) 

Pr. 305 recommended for undergraduates 
Exploration of theory and practice in community advocacy. Focus 
on public deliberation, moral conflict, and community dialogue 
in value-laden topics and controversies. (Fall or Spring) 



555 Relational Communication and the Hollywood Feature 
Film (3:2:3) 

Pr. undergraduates: 207, 300 or 305, and upper division standing 
Analysis and applicaton of images, discourses, and practices con- 
cerning human communication and relationships as they are rep- 
resented in the powerful cultural medium of film. (Alt Years) 

562 Organizational Change: Diversity and Identity (3:3) 

Pr. graduate status or permission of instructor 
Contemporary theory and practices of communication applied to 
changing organizations. Emphasis on the role of diversity and 
issues of identity driving change. 

599 Communication Pedagogy (3:3) 

Pr. graduate status or permission of instructor 
Seminar focusing on the effect of communication upon learning. 
For graduate teaching assistants in any discipline, graduates or 
undergraduates interested in teaching or training. Emphasis on 
pedagogical principles and instructional materials. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



169 



Computer Science 



Department of 
Computer Science 

College of Arts & Sciences 

320 Bryan Building 

336/256-1112 * 

www.uncg.edu/cmp 

Faculty 

Stephen R. Tate, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Blanchet-Sadri, Sadri 

Associate Professors Fu, Green, Suthaharan 

Assistant Professor Deng 

Lecturers Armstrong, Case, Fritz 

The courses in the Computer Science Department are 
designed to teach the foundations of computing rather than a 
particular technology, so that the student is prepared to adapt 
to changing technology. Courses use the C++ programming 
language. Introductory courses use networked microcom- 
puters; advanced courses use UNIX workstations. The job 
market in computer science is strong. A student completing 
a bachelor's degree with a strong academic record can expect 
job offers as a systems programmer or analyst, applications 
programmer, systems support staff member, technical staff 
member, or similar position. The undergraduate curricu- 
lum has also been designed to prepare students for graduate 
studies (master's and doctoral degrees) in computer science. 
Qualified students who have an interest in research will have 
opportunities to participate in projects with department fac- 
ulty during undergraduate or graduate studies. 

Computer Science Major (CMPS) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Computer Science, U180 

Bioinformatics, U838 

The B.S. degree in Computer Science program is accred- 
ited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET. 

Students must maintain a grade point average of at least 
2.0 in the core courses, required electives, and required sup- 
porting discipline courses. 

Because computer science courses change rapidly, it is 
recommended that the sequence 130, 230, 330 be completed 
within four (4) consecutive semesters. 

Requirements 
I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 6 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 



Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

required: MAT 191 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 7 

required: PHY 291 or CHE 111, 112, and one 
additional GNS course with a different 
departmental prefix 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 
Computer Science Concentration 

1 . CSC 130, 230, 250, 261, 312, 330, 339, 340, 350, 490, 553, 562 

2. CSC Electives: 15 additional s.h., selected from any CSC 
course at the 300 level or above, 3 s.h. of which may be 
satisfied by completing one of MAT 310, 390, 394, 515, 
531, 532, 540, 541, 542, 556, STA 551, 552, 580 



170 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Computer Science 



Bioinformatics Concentration 

1. CSC 130, 230, 250, 261, 312, 330, 339, 340, 471, 490, 521, 
526, 553, 562 

2. CSC Elective: 3 s.h. selected from any CSC course at the 
500 level (except 521, 526, 553, 562) 

V Supporting Discipline Requirements 
Computer Science Concentration 

MAT 191*, 292, 293; one of STA 271 or STA 290 

Bioinformatics Concentration 

MAT 191*, 292, 293; one of STA 271 or 290; STA 580 
*MAT 191 satisfies GMT. 

VI Science Requirements 
Computer Science Concentration 

1. Either PHY 291* and 292 or CHE 111*, 112*, 114, 115 

2. At least 4 additional s.h. of science courses (BIO 111 
recommended) selected from any course carrying credit 
toward a biology, chemistry, or physics major. 

Bioinformatics Concentration 

1. CHE 111*, 112* 

2. BIO 111*, 112*, 392, 393 

*B10 111 or 112 satisfies GLS; CHE 111, 112, PHY 291 satisfy GNS. 

Computer Science Minor 

Required: minimum of 15 semester hours (minimum of 9 

hours in residence at UNCG) 

The minor in computer science consists of at least 15 
semester hours of work, chosen as follows: 

1. CSC 130, 230, 250, 330 

2. One of CSC 261, 339, 340 

The Computer Science Minor requires three (3) to four (4) 
semesters to complete. 

Honors in Computer Science 
Requirements 

A minimum of twelve semester hours to consist of: 

• 6 s.h. of contract Honors courses: two (2) from CSC 
471, 521, 522, 523, 524, 526, 529, 539, 540, 550, 555, 
561, 567, 568, 580, 583 

• 6 s.h.: CSC 493 and HSS 490 (CSC 493 must be 
completed before HSS 490) 

Qualifications 

• At least a 3.30 overall GPA at graduation 

• A grade of B or higher in all course work used to satisfy 
the Honors requirements in Computer Science 

• A declared Computer Science major 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in 
Computer Science" and the title of the Senior Honors Project 
will be printed on the student's academic transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

Contact the Department of Computer Science for further 
information and guidance about Honors in Computer Sci- 
ence. 



Career Skills Packages and Professional 
Certificate Programs 

In addition, the Department of Computer Science offers 
career skills packages and certificate programs for majors out- 
side the department. Majors in other departments of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences may acquire a Career Skills Package 
in Computer Programming. Persons already holding a bacca- 
laureate degree in a field outside the department may acquire 
a Professional Certificate in Computer Programming. Also 
see Career Skills Packages for Majors in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 



Career Skills Package 

in Computer Programming 

Required: 13-16 semester hours 
AOSCode: U910 

This Career Skills Package prepares students for entry- 
level positions in computer programming. It requires 13-16 
semester hours of courses and completion of an internship. 
If CSC 261 and CSC 350 are also taken, the program will pre- 
pare students to enter the M.S. in Computer Science program. 
This program is designed for current undergraduate students 
majoring in fields other than computer science. The program 
may be completed through day or evening classes. 

Requirements 

• MAT 150 (meets GMT requirement) 

• CSC 130, 230, 250, 330 

• One of CSC 261, 339, or 340 

• Completion of an internship, with emphasis on computer 
programming, to be selected from: ATY 499, BIO 497, CHE 
490, CCI 450, CST 412, ENG 401 or 402, ENV 399, GEO 
495, MST 494, PSC 399, SOC 499. Another internship can 
be substituted with permission of advisor. Department 
requirements for internships must also be met. 



Professional Certificate 
in Computer Programming 

Required: 19-25 semester hours 
AOSCode: U920 

This certificate program prepares students for entry- 
level positions in computer programming and also serves to 
prepare students to enter the M. S. in Computer Science pro- 
gram. This program is designed for post-baccalaureate stu- 
dents with degrees in fields other than computer science. The 
program may be completed through day or evening classes. 

Requirements 

• MAT 150 

• CSC 130, 230, 250, 261, 330, 340, 350 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



171 



Computer Science 



Computer Science Courses (CSC) 

Courses For Undergraduates 

101 Introduction to Computer Concepts (3:3) 

Introduction to computers and computing. Topics cover impact 

of computers on society, ethical issues, hardware, and software 

applications. (Fall & Spring) 

110 Computational Problem Solving (3:3) 

GECore: GMT 
Using computing to apply mathematical concepts in developing 
algorithmic solutions to real-world problems, stressing analysis 
and logical reasoning. A modern programming language will be 
introduced for examples and assignments. 

130 Introduction to Computer Science (3:2:2) 

Pr. acceptable score on the computer science placement test or a 
grade of at least C (2.0) in MAT 150 
Programming in a high-level language. Emphasis on problem 
analysis, problem-solving techniques, and software design prin- 
ciples and techniques. (Fall & Spring) 

230 Elementary Data Structures and Algorithms (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 130 
Advanced syntax of high level language taught in CSC 130. 
Emphasis on modularization and abstraction. Big-O analysis of 
algorithms. Design and use of abstract data types with various 
implementations. (Fall & Spring) 

237 Programming Language Laboratory (1-3; 1-3) 

• May be taken twice for credit with permission of the department 
head. 

Syntax and use of a programming language. Language covered 
announced at preregistration. 

250 Foundations of Computer Science I (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in both MAT 151 and CSC 130, or 
permission of instructor 
An introduction to the fundamental ideas underlying contem- 
porary computer science with a focus on the computation and 
construction of objects. (All) 

261 Computer Organization and Assembly Language (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 230 and in CSC 250, or 
permission of instructor 
CPU, memory, I/O devices, digital logic design, psw. Number 
representations and machine language. Assembly language 
instruction types, registers, addressing, arithmetic, instruction 
format, opcodes, pseudo-opcodes, assembler directives, system 
calls, and macros. (Fall & Spring) 

312 Ethics in Computer Science (1:1) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 230 and in CSC 250 

• Computer Science majors only. 

Historical and social context of computing, ethical responsibili- 
ties of the computing professional, intellectual property rights, 
and risks and liabilities. (Fall & Spring) 

330 Advanced Data Structures (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 230 and in CSC 250 
Static and dynamic data structures emphasizing binary trees and 
graphs. Advanced programming techniques. Advanced sorting 
and searching algorithms. Hashing techniques. Performance 
analysis. Methods of developing large applications programs. 
(Fall & Spring) 



339 Concepts of Programming Languages (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 330 
Concepts of block-structured, object-oriented, functional, logic, 
and concurrent programming languages. Comparative study of 
syntactic and semantic features of these languages and writing 
programs using them. (Spring) 

340 Software Engineering (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 330 
Practical and theoretical concepts of software engineering. 
(Spring) 

350 Foundations of Computer Science II (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 250, or permission of instructor 
High level concepts in the theoretical foundations of computer 
science. (Fall) 

463 Basic Systems Administration Laboratory (1:0:3) 

Coreq. CSC 562 and CSC 567, or permission of instructor 
Installing operating systems, peripherals, hardware, and software. 
Backups, recompiling the kernel (loading/unloading modules), 
providing Web services, and user administration. (Fall & Spring) 
(Formerly CSC 563) 

464 Intermediate Systems Administration Laboratory (1:0:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 463 
Topics selected from routing, firewall, Primary Domain Control- 
ler, Backup Domain Controller, Domain Controller trust, SAMBA, 
DNS round robin, and PPP connectivity setup. (Fall & Spring) 
(Formerly CSC 564) 

465 Advanced Systems Administration Laboratory (1:0:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 464 
Automated installation, software installation, systems program- 
ming, system administration in a large organization. Projects will 
include departmental or university computer system work. (Fall 
& Spring) (Formerly CSC 565) 

471 Principles of Database Systems (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 330, or permission of instructor 
Contemporary database systems. Emphasis on query processing, 
design, and implementation of applications in relational (SQL) 
databases. Introduction to other database models such as XML, 
object-oriented, and deductive. (Fall) 

490 Senior Project (3:3) 

Pr. CSC 340 and senior standing, or permission of instructor 
Application of classroom knowledge and skills in computer sci- 
ence to solve real-world problems and to develop research and 
development skills. (Fall & Spring) 

493 Honors Work in Computer Science (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit when topic changes. 
Research in a topic of special interest at the Honors level. 

495 Selected Topics in Computer Science (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing and permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit for a total of 6 s.h. when topic of study 
changes. 

A topic of special interest is studied in depth. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

521 Computer Graphics (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 340, CSC 350, and MAT 292, 
or permission of instructor 
Survey of graphics algorithms, data structures, and techniques. 
(Odd Spring) 



172 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Computer Science 



522 Digital Image Processing (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 330, CSC 350, and MAT 292, 
or permission of instructor. Successfd completion ofSTA 271 or 
STA 290 recommended. 
Image representation, enhancement, compression, coding, resto- 
ration, and wavelet transforms. (Fall) 

523 Numerical Analysis and Computing (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 130, CSC 350, and MAT 293, 
or permission of instructor 
Number systems and errors, solutions of non-linear and linear 
systems, eigenvalue problems, interpolation and approximation, 
numerical differentiation and integration, solution of differential 
equations. (Even Spring) 

524 Numerical Analysis and Computing (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 523 
Continuation of 523 with special topics in numerical analysis, 
emphasis on applied mathematics. (Odd Fall) 

526 Bioinformatics (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Introduction to the problems and methods in Bioinformat- 
ics. Problem areas include restriction mapping, map assembly, 
sequencing, DNA arrays, and sequence comparison. (Spring) 

529 Artificial Intelligence (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 339 or permission of instructor 
Logical foundations, knowledge representation and reasoning, 
search and selected topics such as natural language processing 
and reasoning under uncertainty. (Odd Spring) 

539 Introduction to Compiler Design (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 261 and CSC 330 or permission 
of instructor 

• Successful completion of CSC 553 helpful. 
Basic techniques of compiler design and implementation: lexical 
analysis, parsing, code generation. Sizable programming project 
implementing a compiler for a block-structured language with 
strong typing. 

540 Human-Computer Interface Development (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 330 and STA 271 or STA 290 
or permission of instructor 
Survey of concepts and techniques for human-computer interface 
development. Topics include user-centered design, user interface 
programming, and usability evaluation. (Fall) 

550 Combinatorics on Words (3:3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 
Introduction to the problems and methods in algorithmic combi- 
natorics on words. Problem areas include periodicity, primitivity, 
and borderedness. 

553 Theory of Computation (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 350, or permission of instructor 
Finite state automata and regular expressions, context-free gram- 
mars, push-down automata and their use in parsing, overview of 
language translation systems, models for programming language 
semantics, computability and undecidability. (Fall) 
555 Algorithm Analysis and Design (3:3) 

Pr. grade of at least C (2.0) in CSC 330 
Sequential algorithm design and complexity analysis. Dynamic 
programming. Greedy algorithms. Graph algorithms. Selected 
advanced topics from NP-completeness; approximation, ran- 
domized, parallel, number-theoretic algorithms; Fast Fourier 
Transform; computational geometry; string matching. (Fall) 



561 Principles of Computer Architecture (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 250, CSC 261, and CSC 330, or 
permission of instructor 
Hardware and software components of computer systems, their 
organization and operations. Topics: comparative instruction set 
architectures, microprogramming, memory management, pro- 
cessor management, I/O, interrupts, and emulation of processors. 
(Fall) 

562 Principles of Operating Systems (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 261 and CSC 340, or 
permission of instructor 

• Successful completion of CSC 561 helpful. 
Techniques and strategies used in operating system design and 
implementation: managing processes, input/output, memory, 
scheduling, file systems, and protection. (Spring) 

567 Principles of Computer Networks (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 261 and CSC 330, or 
permission of instructor 
Hardware and software components of computer networks, their 
organization and operations. Topics: open system interconnec- 
tion; local area networks; TCP/IP internetworking, routing, and 
packet switching; network programming. (Spring) 

568 Principles of Wireless Networks (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 330 and CSC 567, or 
permission of instructor 
Digitial communications, communication networks, wireless 
communication technology, wireless networking, wireless LANs, 
and wireless network programming. (Spring) 

580 Cryptography and Security in Computing (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 330 and one of CSC 471, CSC 
561, CSC 562, or CSC 567, or permission of instructor 
Modern development of cryptography and secure encryption 
protocols. Program security and viruses. Operating system pro- 
tection. Network and distributed system security. Database secu- 
rity. Administering security. (Fall) 

583 Firewall Architecture and Computer Security (3:3) 

Pr. grades of at least C (2.0) in CSC 567 and CSC 580, or 
permission of instructor 
Firewall hardware and software technologies. Architectures, pro- 
tocols and their applications. (Spring) 

593, 594 Directed Study in Computer Science (1-3), (1-3) 

(Fall & Spring) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



173 



Conflict Studies & Dispute Resolution; Consumer, Apparel, & Retail Studies 



Conflict Studies 
and Dispute Resolution 

Master of Arts and Post-Baccalaureate Certificate 
Programs 

The Graduate School 

North Campus 

5900 Summit Avenue 

Brown Summit NC 27214 

336/217-5100 

Fax 336/217-5101 

www.uncg.edu/grs/Conflict_Resolution 

Cathie J. Witty, Director 

Sherrill W. Hayes, Assistant Director 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for graduate-level courses. 



Department of Consumer, Apparel, 
and Retail Studies 

School of Human Environmental Sciences 

210 Stone Building 

336/334-5250 * 

www. u ncg . ed u/crs 

Faculty 

Gwendolyn S. O'Neal, Professor and Chair of Department 

Professor Dyer 

Associate Professors Carrico, Hodges 

Assistant Professors Watchavesringkan, Yurchisin 

Instructor Ramsey 

The Consumer, Apparel, and Retail Studies Department 
offers three major concentrations: Apparel Product Design, 
Global Apparel and Related Industries, and Retailing and 
Consumer Studies. These concentrations prepare students for 
positions with companies that focus on the process of con- 
cept to consumer for apparel and consumer-related products. 
Graduates may take positions in product design, product 
development, fashion trend forecasting and analysis, quality 
control, sourcing, merchandising, buying, and retail manage- 
ment. 

During the first two years of study students will com- 
plete the majority of their general education requirements and 
begin introductory consumer, apparel, and retailing courses. 
Because many students change majors early in their academic 
careers, the majority of consumer, apparel, and retailing 
courses are offered during the junior and senior years. 

An apparel product construction proficiency exam must 
be passed to progress in the concentration. An alternative to 
taking the proficiency exam, which focuses on sewing and 
apparel construction skills, is to enroll in a basic sewing course 
at another institution. Note: All basic sewing courses must be 
approved by an APD faculty member. Students who choose 



to enroll in a basic sewing course can take the course for at 
least two (2) semester hours credit, earn a grade of C (2.0) 
or better, and transfer the credit to UNCG as a free elective. 
Students must provide to the University Registrar an official 
transcript that documents the grade received in the course. If 
a student takes a noncredit course in basic sewing, he or she 
must still take the APD apparel product construction (sew- 
ing) proficiency exam. All noncredit courses build construc- 
tion skills and cannot be transferred for credit. 

A grade of C (2.0) or better must be earned in all courses 
in the major. 

International exposure is built into the curriculum. Study 
of foreign languages is encouraged and international study 
experiences are possible. All majors take supporting courses 
in the Bryan School of Business and Economics. All students 
in the Retailing and Consumer Studies concentration auto- 
matically earn a business minor by fulfilling their major and 
concentration requirements. 

Internship experiences are required of all CARS students 
through a structured two-course sequence that includes a 
professional development class that prepares them both to 
find internships and to achieve successful internship experi- 
ences. The CARS Internship Program Coordinator structures 
and supervises internships to ensure quality experiences. 
Because of the proximity to North Carolina's strong apparel 
and retailing industries, the majority of students have intern- 
ships within the state; however, the long-standing relation- 
ships between CARS and the apparel, fashion, and retail- 
ing industries link students to opportunities for out-of-state 
internships in such exciting places as New York City, Atlanta, 
and the West Coast. 

Consumer, Apparel, and Retail Studies Major 

(CARS) 

Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Apparel Product Design, U538 
Global Apparel and Related Industries, U864 
Retailing and Consumer Studies, U539 
Criteria for Progression in the Major 

Only grades of C (2.0) or higher in CRS, APD, and RCS 
courses will count toward completion of the CARS major and 
concentrations. An apparel product construction proficiency 
exam must be passed to enroll in the Apparel Product Design 
Studio courses, beginning with APD 250. 

Requirements 
I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 



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One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Department specifies courses for: 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 7 

required: CHE 101 or 103, and CHE 110; 
and one additional GNS course with a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

required: ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, 
and CST 105 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

required: SOC 101 or PSY 121, and CRS 321 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

required: MAT 115 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Student may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

Four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers; at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker. 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III Major and Related Area Requirements 

A. Major Requirements for All Concentrations 

CRS 211, 221, 231, 255, 312, 321, 331, 332, 463, 481; 
APD 242 

Apparel Product Design Concentration Required 
Courses 

APD 244, 250, 251, 310, 341, 342, 443, 444, CRS 372. 
An apparel product construction proficiency exam must 
be passed to enroll in the Apparel Product Design Studio 
courses, beginning with APD 250. 
Global Apparel and Related Industries Concentration 
Required Courses 

CRS 463, 481; RCS 261, 361, 464, 484 
Retailing and Consumer Studies Concentration 
Required Courses 

RCS 261, 361, 362, 464, 484, 560 

B. Related Area Requirements for All Concentrations 

ACC 201; BUS/ENT 240; CHE 101 or 103, and 110; 
CST 105; ISM 110; MAT 115; PSY 121 or SOC 101; 3 s.h. of 
MGT from 200, 309, 312, or 354 



Related Area Requirements for Global Apparel and 
Related Industries Concentration 

IGS 200, 333, 400; two (2) language courses at or 
above the 300 level 

Related Area Requirements for Retailing and Con- 
sumer Studies Concentration 

ECO 201 and 250; MKT 320 

IV Electives 

Apparel Product Design Concentration 

• Three (3) required electives to be taken in the CARS 
major 

One required elective from MKT, MGT, or ECO 
Remaining electives sufficient to complete total semester 
hours required for degree 

Global Apparel and Related Industries Concentration 

Two (2) required electives to be taken in the CARS major 
Remaining electives sufficient to complete total semester 
hours required for degree 

Retail and Consumer Studies Concentration 

Four (4) required electives to be taken in the CARS 
major 

One required elective from MKT, MGT, or ECO to com- 
plete the requirements for a minor in Business 
Remaining electives sufficient to complete total semester 
hours required for degree 



Retailing and Consumer Studies Minor 
Required: minimum of 15 semester hours 

Majors in programs outside of the Consumer, Apparel, 
and Retail Studies Department may elect a minor in Con- 
sumer, Apparel, and Retail Studies by completing 15 semester 
hours, one course of which must be at the 500 level. Required 
courses (9 hours) for the minor are CRS 231, 255, and RCS 
261; the remaining courses can be selected from the following, 
provided prerequisites are met: RCS 361, 362, 464, 484, 560, 
562, or CRS 312, 321, 372, 463, 530. 

Apparel Product Design Courses (APD) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

242 Design Principles Applied to Textile Products (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in CRS 231 
Application of the elements and principles of design to analysis 
of textile products and solution of design problems. Emphasis 
on textile product design evaluations through verbal and written 
communications. (Formerly TDM 242) 

244 Visual Communication for the Textile Products 
Industry (3:2:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 242 
Survey of industry methods for communicating design concepts 
and presenting finished products. Emphasis is on use of media 
and development of techniques for rendering fabrics and textile 
product designs. (Fall) (Formerly TDM 244) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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Consumer, Apparel, & Retail Studies 



250 Product Design Studio I: Process & Structure (3:2:3) 

Pr. MAT 1 15, grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 242 and CRS 211, 
and passing the Apparel Product construction proficiency exam 
Introduction to the apparel design process. Introduction to basic 
flat pattern, draping, and fitting principles. Theories and meth- 
ods in designing apparel for various target markets. (Spring) 
(Formerly TDM 250) 

251 Principles of Apparel Evaluation (2:1:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 250 
An examination and evaluation of ready-to-wear apparel includ- 
ing terminologies, production techniques and price/quality rela- 
tionships. (Fall) (Formerly TDM 251) 

310 Portfolio Development for Apparel Design (2:2) 

Pr. APD 244, 250 
Development of a professional design portfolio that will empha- 
size investigation of specific apparel markets, target customers, 
seasons and fabrications, and various illustrative techniques. 

341 Apparel Design Techniques (3:2:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 250 
Development of apparel designs by flat pattern techniques and 
original design process. (Formerly TDM 341) 

342 Product Design Studio II: Process & Structure (3:2:3) 

Pr. overall grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 250 
Development of the design process for apparel and related prod- 
uct design. Emphasis on designing for specific target markets. 
Advanced principles and methods of developing patterns for 
the body, including advanced flat pattern, draping, and fitting 
principles. Use of CAD tools for pattern development. (Formerly 
TDM 342) 

441 Computer Applications for Textile Products (3:2:3) 

Pr. ISM 110, grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 244 
Utilization of general graphics programs and CAD systems used 
extensively in the fashion industry to create digital presentation 
boards, fashion graphics, woven and print textile designs, and 
technical specification packages. (Formerly TDM 441) 

443 Product Design Studio III: Creative and Experimental 
Design (3:2:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 342 
Principles and methods of product design with an emphasis on 
creative and experimental approaches. Development of visual 
vocabulary and knowledge of trend prediction to generate 
design ideas. Use of diverse materials and structures for three- 
dimensional design. (Formerly TDM 443) 

444 Product Design Studio IV: Technical Design (3:2:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 443 senior majors only. 
Analysis and improvement of apparel fit, specification develop- 
ment, and quality. Process of costing, development of technical 
design, as well as understanding of sizing systems and specific 
markets in product design. (Formerly TDM 444) 

452 Textile Products Production Management (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in CRS 211, 231, and 312 
Overview of management issues in textile product production 
including raw material selection and evaluation, computer inte- 
gration, equipment selection, planning production, costing, and 
quality control. Several manufacturing systems are analyzed. 
(Formerly TDM 452) 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

545 Experimental Product Design (3:2:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in APD 444 
Experimentation with a variety of materials to create apparel 
using both traditional and innovative methods. Emphasis on 
design development and originality. Investigation of various spe- 
cialty markets for apparel design. (Formerly TDM 545) 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 
for additional graduate-level courses. 

Consumer, Apparel, and Retail Studies Courses 
(CRS) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 
211 Textile Science: From Fiber to Finish (3:3) 
Principles of textile science with emphasis on fiber chemical com- 
position, physical structure, and properties; analyses of yarn and 
fabric structures and properties; and fundamentals of coloration 
and finishing. (Formerly TDM 211) 

221 Culture, Human Behavior, and Clothing (3:3) 

GE Core: GSB GE Marker: GN 

Interaction of clothing and textiles with the individual and soci- 
ety: sociological and psychological implications for non-Western 
cultures. (Formerly TDM 121 and CRS 121) 

231 Introduction to Apparel and Consumer Retailing: From 
Concept to Consumer (3:3) 

Interaction of the consumer with apparel, retail, and associated 
industries. Overview of industry processes from raw material to 
consumption for apparel and other consumer products. Career 
opportunities explored. (Formerly TDM 231) 

255 Consumer Survival: Coping with Rights and 
Responsibilities (3:3) 

Study of consumers and consumer choices, big and small, right 
and wrong, in today's complex, ever-changing marketplace. Con- 
sumer rights, responsibilities, and diversity considered. Basis for 
informed and wise consumer decisions. 

312 Quality Analysis of Consumer Goods (3:2:3) 

Pr. CHE 101 or 103 and CHE 110 
Overview of the physical structure and properties of fiber, yarns, 
fabric, and apparel. Examination and evaluation of ready-to-wear 
apparel and related consumer goods from a consumer perspec- 
tive. (Formerly TDM 312) 

321 Social Psychology of Dress (3:3) 

GECore: GSB 

Pr. grade ofC or better in SOC 101 or 341 or PSY 121 
Social and cognitive processes related to the meanings people 
assign to clothing cues when perceiving one another. Focus on 
appearance-related stereotypes: age, gender, physical attractive- 
ness, status, and ethnicity. (Formerly TDM 321) 



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331 Professional Development: Consumer, Apparel, and 
Retail Industries (3:3) 

Pr. application and overall minimum GPA of 2.20 required for all 
concentrations 

Pr. for APD concentration: APD 250 

Pr. for GARl and RCS concentrations: RCS 361 
Guidance and preparation for relevant and successful internship 
experiences in the major. Emphasis on professional norms and 
behavior. Examination of processes, content, requirements, and 
options for self-directed learning opportunities. (Formerly TDM 
461) 

332 Internship: Consumer, Apparel, & Retail Industries 
(3-6:35:5) 

Pr. 18 s.h. in major; overall GPA of 2.20; application required. 

• May not be taken concurrently with CRS 331. 
Campus-monitored, structured internship experiences in off- 
campus businesses, minimum 300 supervised clock hours. Appli- 
cation and development of professional skills relevant to the con- 
sumer, apparel, and retail industries. (Summer) (Formerly TDM 
462) 

372 Survey of Historic Costume (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

Survey of historic costume from prehistory to present, with 
emphasis on social, economic, and political events as well as vari- 
ous cultures that have influenced modern dress. (Formerly TDM 

372) 

400 Special Problems in Consumer Apparel and Retail 
Studies (1-4) 

Individual study. Conference hours to be arranged. (Formerly 
TDM 400) 

401 Supervised Professional Experience (1-4:0:3-12) 

Internship with selected commercial or industrial organizations, 
public or private agencies in accordance with the major course of 
study. (TDM 500 prior to fall 2004; TDM 401 during 2004-05) 

431 Entrepreneurship in Apparel Retailing and Design (3:3) 

Pr. CRS 231 and either BUS 240 or ENT 240 
Exploration of issues in entrepreneurship relative to apparel 
retailing and design and development of skills necessary to estab- 
lish and maintain a successful business. 

463 Global Sourcing of Apparel and Related Consumer 
Products (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in CRS 231, 312, 321; junior or senior 
standing 
Sourcing strategies for apparel and related consumer products, 
global platforms, business and cultural environments, and finan- 
cial transactions used in conducting business in the international 
marketplace. (Formerly TDM 463) 

481 Contemporary Professional Issues in Consumer, 
Apparel, and Retail Studies (3:3) 

Pr.for APD concentration: APD 444 and CRS 463 
Pr.for GARI concentration: RCS 464, CRS 463, and IGS 333 
Pr.for RCS concentration: RCS 362, 464, 560, and CRS 463 
Study of contemporary issues related to consumer, apparel, and 
retail studies. Application of knowledge and skills to solve real 
world industry problems. (Formerly TDM 581) 

482 Special Problems in Consumer, Apparel, and Retail 
Studies (1-4) 

Individual study. Conference hours to be arranged. (Formerly 
TDM 482) 



493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 72 s.h. in the 

major 
• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

(Formerly TDM 493) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

513 Apparel and Related Consumer Products Analysis and 
Standards (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in CRS 312 or graduate standing 
Process of developing and analyzing product standards as they 
relate to consumers, industry, and international trade. Analysis of 
products in relation to existing or proposed standards. (Formerly 
TDM 513) 

530 Economics of the Textile and Apparel Complex (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in ECO 201 or its equivalent as determined 
by the instructor or graduate standing 
Economics and social aspects of production, distribution, and uti- 
lization of apparel and textiles. (Formerly TDM 530) 

563 Analysis of Apparel and Related Industries (3:3) 

Analysis of apparel and related industries from raw materials 
through consumption. Examination of production and market- 
ing of products, technological developments, and domestic and 
global market strategies. (Formerly TDM 563) 

582 Problems in Consumer, Apparel, & Retail Studies (2-6) 
Individual study. (Formerly TDM 582) 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 

Retailing and Consumer Studies Courses (RCS) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 
261 Introduction to Consumer Retailing (3:3) 
Overview of consumer and apparel retailing, focusing on basic 
retail principles. Analysis of retail interfaces with special empha- 
sis on fashion retailing and related consumer products. Career 
opportunities investigated. (Formerly TDM 261) 

361 Fundamentals of Retail Buying and Merchandising (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MAT 115, CRS 231, RCS 261 
Investigation of the roles and responsibilities of buyers and man- 
agers in retail operations. Fundamentals of merchandise math- 
ematics and buying. (Formerly TDM 361) 

362 Integrated Marketing Communications for Apparel and 
Consumer Retailing (3:3) 

Integrated marketing communication approach to consumer, 
apparel, and retailing communication issues. Special emphasis 
put on professional oral and visual communication of advertis- 
ing and promotional concepts. (Formerly TDM 362) 

464 Multicultural and Multichannel Retailing (3:3) 

Pr. RCS 261, 361 
Investigation of consumer benefits offered by multichannel 
retailing of apparel and related consumer products. Focus on 
the importance of culture to successful retailing to diverse global 
consumers. (Formerly TDM 464) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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Counseling & Educational Development 



484 Retail Strategy (3:3) 

Pr. RCS 464 
Investigation of retailing from a strategic perspective. Concepts 
are analyzed and integrated into applied problem-solving sce- 
narios focused on consumer needs. (Formerly TDM 484) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

560 Apparel & Related Consumer Products Marketing (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in RCS 261, 362, or graduate standing 
An intensive analysis of marketing principles applied to the tex- 
tile products industry. (Formerly TDM 560) 

562 Behavior of Soft Lines Consumers (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC (2.0) or better in CRS 321 or graduate standing 
Study of environmental, individual, and psychological influences 
on behavior of consumers during the soft lines consumption pro- 
cess. (Formerly TDM 562) 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



Department of Counseling & 
Educational Development 

School of Education 

228 Curry Building 

336/334-3423 " 

www.uncg.edu/ced 

Faculty 

J. Scott Young, Professor and Chair of the Department 
Professors Benshoff, Borders, Cashwell, Myers 
Associate Professor Lewis 

Assistant Professors Gonzalez, Mobley, Murray, Villalba, Wester 
Adjunct Professors Bundy, Claivson, Disque, Foreman, Hamilton, 
Wiles 

The Counselor Education program at UNCG adheres 
to the scientist problem-solver model of training. Consistent 
with this approach is the program's goal of graduating stu- 
dents who have knowledge of basic counseling, possess a 
high level of competency in providing professional services, 
and have the skills necessary to conduct research. The tenets 
underlying the program include (a) exposure to a variety of 
theoretical orientations for counseling, (b) reliance on both the 
clinical-counseling and vocational-education approaches in 
designing counseling and programmatic interventions, (c) a 
commitment to developing the student's skills as a researcher, 
and (d) an emphasis on developing the normal developmen- 
tal issues of the individual as opposed to an approach based 
on pathology. 

Counseling and Educational Development Degrees 

Degrees offered — Master of Science (M.S.), Dual Degrees 
Master's and Educational Specialist (M.S. and Ed.S.), Doctor 
of Education (Ed.D.), Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 

There are no undergraduate areas of study offered by 
this department. 



Counseling and Educational Development 
Courses (CED) 

Courses for Undergraduates 
210 Career/Life Planning (3:3) 

Introduction to career/life planning; knowledge of career devel- 
opment theories and decision-making theories; emphasis on col- 
lecting information related to the world of work and relating this 
information to the individual. 

310 Helping Skills (3:3) 

Pr. advanced undergraduates in appropriate major. 
Skills useful for facilitating helping relationships. Practical model 
for counseling and learning about helping by practicing the help- 
ing skills. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

506 Institutes in Education (1-3) 

• Students may apply no more than three (3) semester hours of this 
course to any degree program. 

• Grade: Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory, S/U. 

Practicum or workshop experiences to focus on issues, problems, 
or approaches in the profession. 

574 Contemporary Topics in Counseling (3:3) 

Pr. advanced undergraduates in appropriate major 

• May be repeated for credit when topics vary. 

Designed to study issues, problems, and new approaches in help- 
ing relationships. Emphasis placed on current topic(s) of inter- 
est. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



Curriculum and Instruction 

(see Teacher Education and Higher 
Education) 



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Dance 



Department of Dance 

School of Health and Human Performance 

323 Health and Human Performance Building 

336/334-5570 

www.uncg.edu/dce 

Faculty 

Jan Van Dyke, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Gamble, Green, Lavender, Stinson 

Associate Professors Dils, Sullivan 

APT Associate Professor Fore 

Assistant Professors Cyrus, Gee 

APT Assistant Professor Vulpi 

Mission Statement 

The Department of Dance at UNCG offers bachelors and masters 
degrees that provide professional preparation balanced with liberal 
education for a variety of career outcomes in dance. The Department 
prepares students for further study and for the task of creating their 
lives as artists, educators, scholars, and/or related professionals, 
whether at a state, regional, or national level. 

Tlie Department's primary emphasis is teaching students the 
technical skills required for creative work and the critical skills es- 
sential to the creative process and to scholarly inquiry along with the 
knowledge of dance and related areas they will need to pursue diverse 
careers. Tlte Department also plays a significant role in enhancing the 
cultural environment of the campus and larger community through 
the presentation of work by faculty, students, and other artists. 

The Department's program leading to K-12 licensure 
(Standard Professional I) for public school teaching is accred- 
ited by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. 
For further information about requirements, contact the 
Department or see www.uncg.edu/dce/licensure.html. 

The Department of Dance is an accredited institutional 
member of the National Association of Schools of Dance. 
The requirements for entrance and graduation as set forth in 
this Bulletin meet the published regulations for the National 
Association of Schools of Dance. 

Admission to Dance Majors (B.A. and B.F.A.) 

Admission for dance major programs in the Depart- 
ment of Dance is by application only. All prospective dance 
majors must participate in a selective admission process. This 
includes students currently at UNCG who have not been 
accepted as majors in the Department. The audition process 
includes a written application, an audition class, a writing 
sample, and an interview. Application forms and details are 
available from the Department. 

Dance Major (DANC) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOS Code: Dance Studies, U435 

The Dance major (B.A.) is designed to provide students 
with a general education in dance. Majors in Dance Studies 
(B.A.) are required to complete the following program. 



Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

required: any GFA course except DCE 
One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

required: DCE 200 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

required: one GNS lab course and an additional 
GNS course with a different departmental 
prefix (NTR 213 recommended) 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 
required for GL Marker: DCE 200 
required for GN Marker: DCE 205 
Students select: 2 additional courses carrying GL/GN 
markers 
One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 
DCE 505 serves as the major SI course. 
One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 
DCE 305 serves as the major WI course. 

III B.A. Requirements (45 semester hours) 

• DCE 117 recommended 

• Dance History: DCE 205, 305, and 505 

• DCE 200, 217, 241, 253, 255, 340, 355 

• Theory and Practice of Dance (9 s.h.): 

• minimum two (2) s.h. from modern sequence: DCE 
111, 112, 212, 312, 324, 412, 424 

• minimum two (2) s.h. from ballet sequence: DCE 
113, 114, 214, 314, 414 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



179 



Dance 



• minimum 1 s.h. from: DCE 132, 232, or 332, plus 1 
s.h. DCE 216, 231, 232, 316, or 332 

• minimum 1 s.h. from: DCE 312, 324, 412, 424, 314, 
414, 316, 332 

• remaining two (2) s.h. may be taken from any of the 
above, or DCE 230 or 233 

Students must take 10 additional DCE credits at the 300- 
500 level. 

IV Electives 

Sufficient electives to complete the 122 total semester 
hours required for the degree. 

Dance Major (DANC) 
Degree: Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Required: 128 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOSCode: U431 

The Dance major (B.F.A.) is planned to provide experi- 
ences in dance as an art form with emphasis on creative and 
performance activities. Course work in modern dance, bal- 
let technique, choreography, and performance are central in 
the curriculum, providing a basis for graduate study and for 
careers related to dance. 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 
Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

required: any GFA course except DCE 
One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

required: DCE 200 
Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

required: one GNS lab course and an additional 
GNS course with a different departmental 
prefix (NTR 213 recommended) 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

required for GL Marker: DCE 200 

required for GN Marker: DCE 205 



Students select: 2 additional courses carrying GL/GN 
markers 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 
DCE 505 serves as the major SI course. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 
DCE 305 serves as the major WI course. 

III Major Requirements (78 semester hours) 

1. Dance technique and theory (24 s.h.) 

• contemporary dance: grade of B or higher in 6 s.h. 
selected from DCE 312, 324, 412, 424 

• ballet: 4 s.h. selected from: DCE 113, 114, 214, 314, 
414 

• African and other forms: DCE 232 or 332, plus 
three (3) additional s.h. selected from: DCE 216, 
231, 232, 316, 332 

• dance technique electives: 10 additional s.h. 
selected from any of the above, or DCE 230 or 233 

2. DCE 117 (recommended), 200, 205, 217, 241, 253, 255 
(twice), 305, 340, 353, 355, 417, 453, 470 or 487, 505, 546 
or 557; DCE 455 or THR 284 or 584 

3. Dance performance (6 s.h.) selected from: 

DCE 143, 243, 250, 343, or 443; must include at least 2 
s.h. of DCE 343 or 443 

4. Dance Electives to total 78 s.h. in Dance 

5. Overall 2.75 GPA or higher in courses taken at UNCG 

IV Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 128 total semester hours 
required for degree, at least 42 hours outside Dance, includ- 
ing GEC. 

Honors in Dance 

Requirements (18 semester hours) 

• Six (6) semester hours of Honors General Education 
courses must be successfully completed before taking 
any Honors courses in Dance. 

• Six (6) semester hours of 400-500 level contract courses 
in Dance, selected from DCE 412, 414, 417, 424, 443, 453, 
455, 456, 470, 487, 546, 555, 557, 560. 

• Six (6) semester hours consisting of DCE 493 and 505. 
DCE 505 must be taken as an Honors contract course. 
DCE 470 may be substituted for 493 with permission 
of the instructor, the student's academic advisor, the 
department Honors liaison, and the director of the 
Lloyd International Honors College. 

Qualifications 

• A grade of at least B in all course work used to satisfy 
the Honors requirement in Dance 

• A declared Dance major and admission to the depart- 
ment through audition 



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2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Dance 



• At least a 3.30 overall GPA must be maintained from 
the time honors work is begun, continuing through to 
graduation 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in 
Dance" and the title of the Senior Honors Project will be 
printed on the student's official transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

Contact the Department of Dance main office or the 
undergraduate program coordinator for further information 
and guidance about Disciplinary Honors in Dance. 

Dance as Second Major 

Students desiring to take Dance as a second major should 
follow the degree requirements for the B.A. degree in Dance. 

Dance Minor 

Required: minimum 15 semester hours 

AOSCode: U406 

A Dance minor is available for students not wishing to 
specialize but who have an interest in dance and want a con- 
centration of study in the area to complement an affiliated 
program of study. Dance majors are given priority in regis- 
tration for most courses, but minors receive special consider- 
ation. The minor includes a minimum of 15 semester hours, 
with at least seven (7) above the 100 level. 

Requirements: 

• DCE 101, 200 

• Three (3) s.h. Technique selected from DCE 111, 
112, 113, 114, 116, 132, 133, 212, 214, 216, 232, 233, 
312, 314, 316, 324, 332, 412, 414, 424 

Additional courses may be selected from other DCE 
offerings to total a minimum of 15 hours. 

Dance Courses (DCE) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses For Undergraduates 

101 Introduction to Dance (3:3) 

GECore: GFA 

• For non-majors; Dance majors should enroll in DCE 117. 
Introduction to the basic concepts and principles of modern/post- 
modern dance through readings, studio experiences, discussions, 
and concert attendance. (Fall & Spring & Summer) 

111 Beginning Contemporary Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. enrollment priority given to dance majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Introduction to the movement techniques of contemporary 
dance, with emphasis on aesthetic and expressive qualities. (Fall 
& Spring) 



112 Advanced Beginning Contemporary Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Development of technical skills in contemporary dance, includ- 
ing rhythmic perception and spatial awareness, with emphasis 
on aesthetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance. 
(Fall & Spring) 

113 Beginning Ballet (1:0:3) 

Pr. enrollment priority given to dance majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Introduction to basic ballet techniques. (Fall & Spring) 

114 Advanced Beginning Ballet (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Development of technical skills in ballet, including directions 
of the body, alignment, function and access of turnout, and use 
of the French ballet lexicon, with emphasis on safe and efficient 
body use. (Fall & Spring) 

116 Beginning Jazz Dance (1:0:3) 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Introduction to the style, technique, and rhythmic structures of 
jazz dance with emphasis on increasing movement capabilities 
and personal expression. (Fall & Spring) 

117 Movement as a Medium (3:3) 

Pr. dance majors only 
Orientation to the art of dance and the principles governing it. 
Presentation of materials and experiences related to a realistic 
concept of the roles of dance in society. (Fall) 

132 Beginning African Dance (1:0:3) 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Introduction to the history and vocabulary of West African dance, 
emphasizing the central role that dance plays in African cultures. 
(Fall) 

133 Beginning Tap Dance (1:0:3) 

• May be repeated for a maximum of two (2) credits. 
Introduction to theory, historical context, and technique of tradi- 
tional and contemporary tap dance forms. (Fall) 

143 Introduction to Dance Repertory (1:0:3) 

Pr. or Coreq. placement in advanced-beginning level or higher in 
ballet or contemporary dance, or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated once for credit. 

Development of basic dance performance skills through cre- 
ation/restaging, rehearsal, and informal or formal presentation 
of choreography created by dance faculty or by departmentally 
approved dance artists. (Fall or Spring) 

200 Dance Appreciation (3:3) 

GECore: GPA GE Marker: GL 

• Selected sections meet Writing Intensive (WI) requirement. 

• Selected sections may be designated for Dance majors. 
Introductory study of dance through a variety of critical lenses 
and practical experiences. Lectures, films, demonstrations, and 
practical dance experience. (Fall & Spring) 

205 Dance History I: World Dance Traditions (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

Pr. Dance majors and itiinors only. 
Study of the histories and aesthetic systems of selected world 
dance traditions, emphasizing interconnections between aes- 
thetic practice and religious and social needs and the impact of 
cultural convergence on dance. (Spring) 



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Dance 



212 Intermediate Contemporary Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Further development of technical skills in contemporary dance, 
including increased movement capabilities, rhythmic accuracy, 
and spatial relationships, with emphasis on aesthetic and expres- 
sive qualities that lead to performance. (Fall & Spring) 

214 Intermediate Ballet (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Development of technical skills in ballet, including safe and effi- 
cient alignment and clear articulation of movement vocabulary, 
with emphasis on increased vocabulary and musicality. (Fall & 
Spring) 

216 Intermediate Jazz Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. dance major, or departmental permission 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Continuation of 116. (Fall & Spring) 

217 Exploration and Improvisation in Dance (2:1:3) 
Pr. Dance major or permission of instructor 

Guided exploration in the elements of dance for the creative 
development of personal movement repertoire, spontaneous 
group interaction, and choreographic and movement observa- 
tion skills. (Spring) 

230 Somatic Practices in Dance (1:0:3) 

• Priority enrollment given to dance majors. 

• May be repeated for credit. 

The study of somatic practices in dance. Students will explore 
and discuss issues related to one body practice. Topics include 
body awareness, alignment, injury prevention, and movement 
observation. 

231 Global Dance Forms (1:0:3) 

Pr. required placement in DCE 112 or 114 dance technique or 
departmental permission 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Classical and vernacular dances from Europe, Asia and the 
Pacific, Africa, and the Americas. Particular dance form varies by 
semester. (Fall & Spring) 

232 Intermediate African Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Intermediate-level African dance technique. Further explora- 
tion of the principles of West African movement and the historic 
and cultural contexts in which the dances are presented. (Fall & 
Spring) 

233 Intermediate Tap Dance (1:0:3) 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Continuation of tap dance technique through traditional move- 
ment vocabulary, contemporary forms and improvisation, and 
historical context of tap dance. (Spring) 

241 Music for Dance (2:1:2) 

Pr. Dance majors only 
Study of the relationship of sound and movement, accompani- 
ment and dance, accompaniment/composer and teacher/chore- 
ographer, and a practical application of these understandings. 
(Spring) 



243 Beginning Dance Repertory (1:0:3) 

Pr. or Coreq. DCE 212 or higher 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Development of performance skills for low intermediate dancers 
through rehearsals and performances of a significant dance work 
choreographed by dance faculty or approved dance artists in the 
field. (Fall & Spring) 

250 Dance Performance Practicum (1:0:3) 

Pr. open by audition or invitation 

• May be repeated for a maximum of eight credits. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 
Extensive rehearsal culminating in formal or informal presenta- 
tion of choreography created by students. (Fall & Spring) 

253 Choreography I: Craft (2:1:2) 

Pr. DCE 241; junior or senior Dance major 
Study of the elements of time, space, and design as they are artis- 
tically significant in dance. (Fall) 

255 Dance Production Practicum I (1:0:3) 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Supervised experience in introductory level technical production 
work supporting dance performances. (Fall & Spring) 

305 Dance History II: Dance in the United States (3:3) 

Pr. DCE 205 

• Dance majors only. 
Study of the history of dance in the United States, emphasizing 
concert and social dance as syntheses of African and European 
dance traditions and including discussion of Native American 
performance. All sections are taught as Writing Intensive (WI). 
(Fall) 

312 High Intermediate Contemporary Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Further development of technical skills in contemporary dance, 
including increased complexity of movement capabilities, rhyth- 
mic structure, and spatial designs, with emphasis on aesthetic and 
expressive qualities that lead to performance. (Fall & Spring) 

314 High Intermediate Ballet (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Further development of technical skills in ballet, including 
dynamic alignment, body/mind connection, and proprioception, 
with emphasis on self expression through the ballet aesthetic. 
(Fall & Spring) 

316 Advanced Jazz Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Continuation of 216 for further development of skill, style, and 
understanding of the jazz form of dance. 
323 The Arts as Human Experience (3:3) 
An examination of the meaning of the arts experience, includ- 
ing its historical and personal significance. Includes reading and 
related work in art, dance, drama, and music. (Same as ART 323, 
THR 323) 



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2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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324 Contemporary Dance: Theory and High Intermediate- 
Level Technique (2:1:3.5) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Theory and practice of intermediate-level contemporary dance 
technique and its relationship to the artistic and professional 
field. (Fall & Spring) 

332 Advanced African Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Advanced study of complex rhythms of African dance. The class 
will connect traditional songs, dances, and music with the culture 
and use those elements in choreography. (Spring) 

340 The Body and Motion in Dance (3:3) 

Study of the body and movement as relevant to dance. Empha- 
sis on anatomical and kinesiological principles, alignment, body 
issues, prevention and care of injuries. (Fall) 

343 Intermediate Dance Repertory (1:0:3) 

Pr. or Coreq. 312 or higher 

• May not be taken concurrently with DCE 487. 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Development of performance skills for intermediate dancers 
through rehearsals and performances of a significant dance work 
choreographed by dance faculty or approved dance artists in the 
field. (Fall & Spring) 

345 Dance Education in Elementary Schools (2:4 for 10.5 
weeks) 

Pr. junior, senior, or graduate standing in elementary education 
Observation/participation of dance education with elementary 
schools, as well as some special education students of varying 
ages, with reflection on the nature of dance and its educational 
significance. 

353 Choreography II: Process (2:1:2) 

Pr. DCE 217 and 253 
Study of and experience in various approaches to the choreo- 
graphic process as related to artistic concepts and to the phi- 
losophy of art as espoused by various traditional and contem- 
porary dance artists and as developed by the individual student. 
(Spring) 

355 Dance Production Practicum II (1:0:3) 

Pr. 1 credit of DCE 255 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Supervised experience in advanced level technical production 
work supporting dance performances. (Fall & Spring) 

365 Practicum: Dance in School and Community Settings 
(1-6:0:3-18) 

Pr. junior or senior standing; 2.70 overall GPA with a 3.0 GPA in 
Dance; and permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six (6) semester 
hours. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Practical experience in an approved dance or dance-related set- 
ting. Each credit earned requires a minimum of 45 clock hours. 
(Fall & Spring) 



412 Advanced Contemporary Dance (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Refinement of technical skills in contemporary dance at the 
advanced level, including complex movement capabilities, 
rhythmic structures, and spatial designs, with emphasis on aes- 
thetic and expressive qualities that lead to performance. (Fall & 
Spring) 

414 Advanced Ballet (1:0:3) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Mastery of kinesthetic, expressive, and aesthetic principles of 
contemporary ballet at an advanced/professional level. (Fall & 
Spring) 

417 Contact Improvisation (1:0:3) 

Pr. 217 or permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Development of improvisational performance skills for advanced 
dancers through a thorough study of Contact Improvisation. 
(Fall) 

424 Contemporary Dance: Theory and Advanced Level 
Technique (2:1:3.5) 

Pr. departmental permission; enrollment priority given to dance 
majors 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Theory and practice of advanced-level contemporary dance tech- 
nique and its relationship to the artistic and professional field. 
(Fall & Spring) 

443 Advanced Dance Repertory (1-3) 

Pr. DCE 312, 324, 412, or 424, and permission of instructor 

• By audition or by invitation of the instructor 

• May be repeated for credit. 

Development of performance skills for advanced dancers through 
rehearsals and performances of a significant dance work choreo- 
graphed by dance faculty or approved dance artists in the field. 
(Fall & Spring) 

453 Choreography III: Group Forms (2:1:2) 

Pr. DCE 217 and 253 
Study of and experience in developing choreographic materials 
for various sized groups. Special emphasis on techniques for the 
integration of formal values and artistic intention. (Fall) 

455 Career Management for the Dance Artist (2:3) 

Pr. Dance majors only, or permission of instructor 
Overview of the professional dance world. Course work involves 
viewing videos of today's touring companies and learning basic 
skills in auditioning, applying for jobs, grant writing, and orga- 
nizing promotional materials. (Alt Spring) 

456 Field Study: Dance in New York City (1) 

Pr. Dance major or permission of instructor 
A one week trip to New York City over Spring Break; activities 
include attending dance concerts and selected classes, and meet- 
ing with dancers who live and work in the City. (Even Spring) 

458 Field Experience Teaching in K-12 Dance Education 
(3:3) 

Pr. DCE 557 and admission to Teacher Education in Dance; grade 
of B or higher in DCE 212 
Development of competencies for teaching dance in K-12 public 
school settings. 



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Economics 



461 Student Teaching in Dance Education (9) 

Pr. admission to Student Teaching 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Supervised student teaching experience in dance education. Full- 
time teaching in a school setting. (Fall & Spring) 

463 Seminar in Dance Education (3:3) 

Pr. DCE 546 and 557 
Synthesizing of experiences in teaching dance in public schools, 
with continuing development of professional competencies and 
preparation of portfolio required for K-12 licensure. (Spring) 

470 Creative Synthesis in Dance (3:3) 

Pr. grades ofB or higher in DCE 353 and 453 and senior status in 
B.F.A., or permission of instructor 
Culminating choreographic experience for students completing 
choreography concentration in B.F.A. (Spring) 

475 Independent Study (1-3) 

Pr. demonstrated competency for independent work and permission 
of academic advisor and instructor 

• May be repeated for a maximum of six (6) semester hours. 
Intensive work in area of special interest in dance. Available to 
exceptionally qualified students on recommendation of academic 
advisor and instructor. (Fall & Spring) 

476 Selected Topics in Dance (1-3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated twice for credit. 

Current topics and issues in dance as art, education, or therapy 
for students with sufficient preparation for intensive study of 
identified area. 

487 Performance Theory and Practice (2:1:3) 

Pr. or Coreq. DCE 412 or 424 

• May not be taken concurrently with DCE 343. 

Rehearsal and performance of choreography designed to chal- 
lenge student dancers at their highest level of performance. Cho- 
reography by full time faculty. Selected readings and written 
assignments accompany practical work. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

505 Contemporary Dance: Aesthetic and Cultural Practice 
(3:3) 

Pr. DCE 205 and 305; graduate students must have satisfied the 
dance history requirement for admission to a graduate dance 
program 
Study of cultural issues and aesthetic priorities of dance in the 
late postmodern world, especially contemporary dance. Provides 
opportunities to present ideas about and debate issues concern- 
ing contemporary dance. All sections are taught as Speaking 
Intensive (SI). (Spring) 

546 Perspectives on Dance Education (3:3) 
Theoretical foundations in dance education and their implica- 
tions for curriculum and teaching. (Fall) (Formerly DCE 446) 

555 Technology in the Creation and Preservation of Dance 
Works (3:3) 

Pr. DCE 355, or admission to graduate study in dance, or 
permission of the instructor 
A study of software applications useful in the creation and/or 
preservation of dance works. Areas of study include soundscore 
creation, video editing, and graphics manipulation. (Fall) 



557 Dance Pedagogy for Ages 5-18 (3:2:2) 

• For Dance and Dance Education majors only. 
Consideration of methodological issues related to teaching dance 
in public school and community settings. (Spring) (Formerly 
DCE 457) 

560 The Dancer's Body (3:3) 

Pr. two semesters of dance technique, and 340 or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor 
An introduction to the study of body theories and practices in 
dance. Topics include somatic theory and practice, and body 
issues related to dance performance, choreography, and peda- 
gogy. (Every Third Summer) 

581 Dance on Video (3:3) 

Pr. DCE 555 or permission of instructor 
Introduction to working with dance and video, including com- 
posing for the camera, recording dancers in action, and editing 
footage to create original work. (Spring) (Same as MST 581) 

589 Experimental Course: Perspectives on Dance in North 
Carolina (3:3) 

Pr. advanced undergraduates with permission of instructor 
Students will engage with and contribute to a history of dance 
in North Carolina through research of existing literature and 
through original research. (Offered fall '08) 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



Department of Economics 

Bryan School of Business & Economics 

462 Bryan Building 
336/334-5463 * 
www.uncg.edu/bae/econ 

Faculty 

Stuart D. Allen, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Link, Neufeld, Ribar, Ruhm 

Associate Professors Bearse, Holland, Layson, Leyden, McCrickard 

(Associate Dean), Snoivden (Director of Graduate Studies) 
Assistant Professors Courtemanche, Swann 
Lecturers Brod (Director of Office of Business and Economics 

Research), Hayek, Sarbaum, Sheran 

Mission Statement 

Hie Department of Economics supports the teaching, research, and 
service missions of the University and the Bryan School of Business 
and Economics. The Department's undergraduate courses and pro- 
grams prepare students for the competitive global marketplace, career 
and professional development, and graduate education. Its innovative 
graduate programs, the M.A. in Applied Economics and the Ph.D. in 
Economics with a focus on applied microeconomics, provide students 
with a mastery of advanced empirical and analytical methods so they 
can conduct high-quality research and contribute to the knowledge 
base in business, government, nonprofit, and research settings. The 
Department conducts high-quality nationally recognized research 
that supports its academic programs, promotes economic understand- 
ing, and fosters economic development in the Triad and the state. 

The Department of Economics provides students with 
an understanding of economic principles, concepts, and insti- 
tutions, and the ability to analyze economic problems and 



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Economics 



public policy issues. Economics is a social science concerned 
with public policy issues such as pollution and the environ- 
ment, the health system, central bank policy and inflation, 
unemployment, the productivity of the labor force, economic 
growth, and international trade and finance. 

The Department of Economics offers two undergraduate 
degrees through the Bryan School of Business and Economics: 
a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.). The 
B.S. degree builds on a comprehensive business foundation 
by teaching students how to apply economic reasoning and 
analysis to a variety of business and economic issues. Students 
may select a concentration in financial economics by substi- 
tuting certain economics and finance courses for economics 
electives. Students can choose to double major in other busi- 
ness programs. The B.A. degree builds on a comprehensive 
liberal arts education in the sciences, humanities, and arts 
by teaching students how to apply economic reasoning and 
analysis to a variety of economic policy issues. Students can 
choose to double major in the liberal arts, the social sciences, 
or the natural sciences. 

A B.A. or B.S. degree in economics provides students 
with enhanced access to the job market and to graduate and 
professional education. Additional statistical and quantita- 
tive course work allows students to develop research skills 
and computer expertise that are important for entry into the 
job market and graduate programs. 

The Department of Economics offers a Master of Arts 
degree in Applied Economics that provides students with the 
theoretical and statistical training to enter the job market as 
professional economists employable by financial institutions, 
health organizations, consulting firms, research organiza- 
tions, and government agencies. 

The Department of Economics also offers qualified stu- 
dents the opportunity to accelerate their study of economics 
by taking MA. courses for graduate credit during their senior 
year. See Accelerated Master's Programs for Undergraduates 
for details. The program enables students the opportunity to 
earn the M.A. degree in one additional year of study. 

Teacher licensure is also available for economics majors 
(see Teacher Education Programs). 

Student Learning Goals 

Critical thinking, quantitative analysis, communication 
skills, and economic reasoning are highly valued in the com- 
petitive global economy. In order to prepare our students for 
their careers and possible future graduate work, our B.A. and 
B.S. graduates will be able to: 

• demonstrate knowledge of intermediate 
microeconomic theory 

• demonstrate knowledge of intermediate 
macroeconomic theory 

• use mathematical and statistical skills to analyze 
economic problems 

• apply economic theory and analytical skills in 
economics field courses 

• effectively communicate how to use economic 
concepts and principles to address economic 
problems 



Economics Major (ECON) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

Available Concentrations and AOS Codes: 

Economics, U305 

Economics with Teacher Licensure in Social 

Studies, U309 

General Program Requirements 

1. Formal admission to the Department of Economics, 
including the following: 

a. Successful completion of ECO 101 or 201, 202, 250; 
ISM 110; and MAT 120 or 191 

b. A minimum GPA of 2.0 in ECO 101 or 201, 202, and 
250 

c. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 

2. 122 s.h. 

3. At least 50 percent of the major hours must be earned at 
UNCG 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Department specifies courses for: 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

MAT 120 or 191 
Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

PHI 361 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and CST 105 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

ECO 201 and 202 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 
Students may select courses for: 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers: 3-6 s.h. (1-2 
courses) of the same foreign language depending upon 
placement; 2-3 additional GL/GN courses, one of which 
must carry the GN marker 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



185 



Economics 



One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III Major and Related Area Requirements 

1 . ECO 101 or 201*, 202*, 250, 301, 346; ISM 110; MAT 120* 
or 191* 

2. Economics electives: 15 s.h. 

*MAT 120 or 191 satisfies GMT; ECO 201 and 202 satisfy GSB 

IV Additional Requirements for Economics 
Major with Teacher Licensure in Social Studies 

Students seeking teacher licensure should see Teacher 
Education Programs for additional licensure requirements. 
Licensure in social studies is available for economics majors. 

V Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 122 total semester hours 
required for degree. 

Economics Major (ECON) 
Degree: Bachelor of Science 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOS Codes for Economic Concentrations: 

Economics, U717 
Financial Economics, U329 

Economics with Teacher Licensure in Social Studies, 
U311 

General Program Requirements 

1. Formal admission to the Department of Economics, 
including the following: 

a. Successful completion of ACC 201 or 218, 202; CST 
105; ECO 101 or 201, 202, 250; ENG 101 or FMS 
115 or RCO 101, ENG 102 or other approved ENG 
course; ISM 110; and MAT 120 or 191 

b. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 

2. 122 s.h. 

3. At least 15 semester hours of Economics must be earned 
at UNCG 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 



Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
One additional GLT, GFA, or GPR course 3 

Department specifies courses for: 
Mathematics (GMT) 3 

MAT 120 or 191 
Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

PHI 361 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and CST 105 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

ECO 201 and 202 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for the following: 
Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, one of which 
must carry the GN marker 
One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 
One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III Major Requirements 

1. ECO 101 or 201*, 202*, 250, 300*, 301, 346 

2. Remaining courses selected from one of the concentra- 
tions listed below: 

Economics Concentration 

9 s.h. of ECO electives at the 300 level or above 
Financial Economics Concentration 

ECO 327 (or FIN 330), and three Finance (FIN) elec- 
tives above the 315 level. 

IV Related Area Requirements 

ACC 201 or 218, 202; CST 105*; ENG 101*, ENG 102 or 
other approved ENG course; FIN 315; ISM 110; MGT 309* or 
ECO WI/SI course; MAT 120* or 191*; SCM 302 

*MAT 120 or 191 fulfills GMT; ENG 101 and CST 105 fulfill 
GRD; ECO 201 and 202 fulfill GSB; ECO 300 fulfills 3 s.h. of Gil 
GN requirement; MGT 309 fulfills major WI and SI requirements; 
CST 105 fulfills SI requirement outside major. 

Note: No more than 30 s.h. of traditional business courses 
(ACC, BUS, FIN, ISM, MGT, MKT, and SCM courses taught 
by Bryan School faculty) will count toward the B.S. degree in 
Economics. 



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V Additional Requirements for Economics Major 
with Teacher Licensure in Social Studies 

Students seeking teacher licensure should see Teacher 
Education Programs for additional licensure requirements. 
Licensure in social studies is available for economics majors. 

VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete 122 total semester hours 
required for degree. 

Honors in Economics 
Requirements 

For Honors requirements, check with the departmental 
office and see Honors Programs information in this chapter. 

Economics as a Second Major 

Completion of a second major in economics is a good 
choice for students in other social sciences, mathematics, and 
other professional areas. The double major can usually be 
fitted into a normal four-year liberal arts course of study. In 
highly structured professional programs, additional semester 
hours beyond the minimum required for graduation are nec- 
essary. 

Students who double major in economics and another 
field must complete all major requirements in both areas as 
well as the general requirements for the degree which they 
are seeking. 

Economics Minor 

Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

AOSCode: U305 

ECO 101 or 201 plus fifteen additional semester hours of 
economics are required to complete a minor. 

An economics minor is especially appropriate for stu- 
dents whose majors are geography, history, mathematics, 
political science, sociology, or for students doing interdisci- 
plinary study in the social sciences. 

Accelerated Master's Programs for Economics 
Majors 

Interested students should see Accelerated Master's Pro- 
grams for Undergraduates for details about the B.A./ M.A. 
in Economics or B.A. in Economics/M.P.A. in Public Affairs 
program requirements. 

Economics Courses (ECO) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

100 Economic Development of the Non-Western World (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

Pr. freshman or sophomore standing only, or permission of 
instructor 
The economics of developing nations, with a natural emphasis on 
the non-Western world. Topics include demographics, education, 
employment, health care, the environment, foreign aid, interna- 
tional institutions, and theories of economic growth. 



101 Introduction to Economics (3:3) 

GECore: GSB 

• Students with credit for ECO 201, 202 or equivalent, cannot also 
receive credit for 101. 
Introduction to basic economic concepts and public policy issues 
with application to the contemporary American economy. 

201 Principles of Microeconomics (3:3) 

GECore: GSB 
Introduction to microeconomic principles and analysis. Topics 
include: the market economy, supply and demand, shortages 
and surpluses, competition and monopoly, international trade, 
and public policy issues. 

202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3:3) 

GECore: GSB 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Introduction to macroeconomic principles and analysis. Topics 
include the national income, the monetary system, inflation, busi- 
ness cycles, fiscal policy, the national debt, exchange rates, bal- 
ance of payments, and economic growth. 

215 The Economics of Entrepreneurship (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Study of entrepreneurship from history of economic thought 
perspective and application of such concepts to economic agents. 
Emphasis on economic thought, market activity, and economic 
growth. (Spring) (Same as ENT 215) 

250 Economic and Business Statistics I (3:3) 

Pr. MAT 115 or 150, ECO 101 or 201, and ISM 110 
Introduction to statistical methods with applications in econom- 
ics and business. Topics include descriptive statistics, probabil- 
ity, statistical inference, correlation, and regression. Emphasis on 
problem solving with microcomputer applications. 

300 The International Economy (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201, and 202; or permission of instructor 
Examines the history, structure, and institutional foundations of 
the international trading system. Analyzes the impact of trade on 
economic growth, employment and living standards with a focus 
on contemporary issues. 

301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201, and 202 
Intermediate level analysis of consumer theory and theory of the 
firm. Other topics include market failure, savings and invest- 
ment, risk and uncertainty, wage determination, and income dis- 
tribution. 

310 The U.S. in the Global Economy: 1700-2000 (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201, and 202; or permission of instructor 
Examination of the history of the United States in the interna- 
tional economy. Examines trade policy, technological and indus- 
trial leadership, immigration, the depression, and American post- 
WWII dominance. 

311 Managerial Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 250 
Economic analysis of management and firm behavior. Topics 
include: the nature of the firm, managerial decision-making, 
demand, market structures, competitive strategies, finance, costs, 
supply, pricing, R&D, and mergers. 



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Economics 



312 Economics of Technology (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Economic analysis of technological change. Topics include 
sources of productivity inventive activity entrepreneurship, 
innovation strategy R&D management, patenting, and technol- 
ogy assessment. (Fall) (Same as ENT 312) 

319 Quantitative Analysis I (3:3) 

Pr. MAT 120 or 191, and ECO 201 
Introduction to mathematical methods in economics. Includes 
applications of mathematics to consumer and production theory, 
equilibrium analysis, input-output models, and optimization. 
(Spring) 

323 Public Finance (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 301 
The analysis of taxes and expenditures. Topics include: rationale 
for government (public goods, externalities), expenditure analy- 
sis (including income redistribution), tax analysis (including 
income, sales, and property taxes). (Spring) 

325 Sports Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Economic theory of sports leagues: competitive balance, player 
labor markets, and owner capital markets. Theories of league 
expansion, rival leagues, franchise relocation, and sports venues. 

327 Money and Economic Activity (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 202 
Emphasis on legal, institutional, and economic forces which 
mutually interact to determine supply of money. Elementary 
monetary theory and monetary flows, institutions, policies, and 
problems analyzed. International as well as domestic monetary 
analysis. (Fall) 

346 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 202; admission to an approved program 
Intermediate level analysis of national income and employment 
with attention to fiscal and monetary policy, theories of business 
fluctuations, and economic growth. (Spring) 

351 Economic and Business Statistics II (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 250 
Continuation of 250. Multiple regression, time series analysis, 
simple forecasting, basic econometric models applied to case 
studies in business, economics, and finance. Use of statistical pro- 
grams. (Spring) 

360 International Monetary Economics I (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 202 
Analysis of balance of payments and international monetary 
systems. Monetary and fiscal policies under the gold standard, 
fixed exchange, and flexible exchange systems. Breakdown of the 
Bretton Woods system and the current exchange rate policies of 
central banks. 

363 European Economic History (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Study of evolution of European economics from early modern 
times to the twentieth century. Emphasis on sources of growth: 
trade, migration, industry, technical change, labor, and capital. 
(Same as HIS 363.) 

365 The Economics of European Integration (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 201 and 202 
Examines the historical, current and expected future economics 
of the European Union. Topics include: trade, protectionism, har- 
monization, labor issues, the Euro, expansion and interrelation 
with the global economy 






370 Labor Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 301 
Examination of wage and employment determination in U.S. 
labor markets. Topics include labor supply and labor demand 
theory, investments in education and training, job search and 
migration, unemployment, unions, racial and sex discrimination, 
income inequality, and public policy. (Fall) 

375 Government and Business (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Government regulation and control of markets. Emphasis on 
antitrust laws and economics as well as control by regulation. 

380 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Examination of environmental problems in market economies. 
Topics include the economic theory of pollution and its control, 
common-property resources, renewable and other resources, 
endangered species, population growth, and international prob- 
lems. 

390 Health Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 301 or equivalent 
Examination of supply and demand for health care, medical mal- 
practice, health insurance, government provision of health care, 
international comparisons, and health care reform. 

467 Economic Growth and Development (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 300 
Investigation of the determinants of the long-run economic 
growth of nations. Application of economic concepts to problems 
of developing and lesser developed countries. (Spring) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

499 Problems in Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 201 and consent of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit with approval of department head. 
Independent study, research, and discussion covering a topic or 
group of related topics of current interest in economic policy or 
economic theory. Topics covered vary from semester to semester. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 

Students 

510 Law and Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 301 

• Taught as Writing Intensive and Speaking Intensive 

Applies economic theory in analysis of law. Presents framework 
for analysis, examines property rights, studies public regulation, 
and examines antitrust laws. (Spring) 

513 Directed Studies in Economics I (1-3) 

Pr. 21 s.h. of economics and permission of instructor 
Individual study of economic problems of special interest to the 
student. Regular conferences with instructor required. 

517 American Economic History: Colonial Times to 1865 
(3:3) 

Pr. ECO 201 
Evolution of the American economy through the Civil War. 
Emphasis on sources of economic growth and welfare. (Same 
as HIS 517) 



188 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Educational Leadership & Cultural Foundations 



518 American Economic History: 1865 to Present (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 201 
Evolution of the American economy from the Civil War to pres- 
ent. Emphasis on economic performance through time mea- 
sured against goals of full employment, price stability and rapid 
growth. Course taught as Writing Intensive (WI) and Speaking 
Intensive (SI). (Spring) (Same as HIS 518) 

523 Topics in Public Policy (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 301 

• TaugJit as Writing Intensive and Speaking Intensive. 
Examination of market failure, public goods, economic efficiency 
and income incidence, allocative effects, and public policy. 
(Fall) 

530 Urban and Regional Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 301 
Application of analytical tools of economics to explain economic 
organization of cities, metropolitan areas, and larger regions and 
to deal with their economic problems. Problem areas analyzed 
include growth, poverty housing, transportation. 

553 Economic Forecasting (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 351 
Forecasting economic trends and fluctuations. Applications for 
regression analysis, exponential smoothing techniques, and Box- 
Jenkins procedures to forecast such economic variables as gross 
national product and unemployment levels. 

555 History of Economic Thought (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 202 

• Course taught as Writing Intensive (WI) and Speaking Intensive 
(SI) 

Main currents in evolution of economic thought with emphasis 
on classical and neoclassical schools and developments in eco- 
nomic ideas during twentieth century. (Fall) 

570 Topics in Labor Economics (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 301 
Advanced theory and research related to labor supply and 
demand theory, investments in human capital, job search theory, 
migration, unemployment, theories of discrimination, income 
distribution theory, and public policy. 

575 Industrial Organization and Public Policy (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 301 
Theoretical and empirical study of firms relative to their rivals, 
suppliers, and customers. Use of theory and industry studies 
to understand the nature of competition and consequences of 
imperfect competition. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 
for additional graduate-level courses. 



Education (EDU courses) 
(see Teachers Academy) 



Department of 
Educational Leadership 
& Cultural Foundations 

School of Education 

239A Curry Building 

336/334-3490 
www.uncg.edu/elc 

Faculty 

Carol A. Mullen, Professor and Chair of the Department 

Professors Hudak, Reitzug, Shapiro 

Associate Professors Casey, Lashley, Villaverde 

Assistant Professors Cooper, Gause 

Clinical Assistant Professor Williams 

Adjunct Professors Short, Thompson 

Adjunct Associate Professor Grier 

Visiting Professor Coble 

A major component of this department is an undergrad- 
uate course, ELC 381, "The Institution of Education," which 
is required of all students who are planning to seek teacher 
licensure. 

There are no undergraduate areas of study offered by 
this department. 

Educational Administration/Leadership Majors 

Degrees offered— Master of School Administration; Spe- 
cialist in Education, Ed.S.; Doctor of Education, Ed.D. 

Curriculum and Teaching Major 

Degree offered — Cultural Foundations (Ph.D.) 

Educational Leadership and Cultural 
Foundations Courses (ELC) 

Courses for Undergraduates 
375 Philosophy of Education (3:3) 

Philosophical questions related to education, such as what is edu- 
cation, how are the aims of education to be decided, and what 
is knowledge, pursued in conjunction with classic historic read- 
ings in the philosophies of education and knowledge as well as 
selected contemporary reading. 

381 The Institution of Education (3:3) 

• Required of students seeking teacher licensure. 
School as a social institution concerned with transmission of 
ideological, moral, and cultural values; social reproduction and 
change; and competing philosophical visions of education with 
particular focus on democratic citizenship. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



189 



Educational Research Methodology; English 



Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

506 Institutes in Education (1-3) 

• Students may apply no more than three (3) semester hours of this 
course to any degree program. 

• Grade: Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory, SIU. 

Practicum or workshop experiences to focus on issues, problems, 
or approaches in the profession. 

581 Teaching in the Urban School (3:3) 

Pr. admission to teacher education or permission of instructor 
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for educators 
to examine research and literature related to the problems of 
teaching in the urban school. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



Department of 

Educational Research 

Methodology 

School of Education 

206 Curry Building 

336/334-3471 
www.uncg.edu/erm 

Terry Ackerman, Professor and Chair of the Department 
Professors Chalhoub-Deville, Leucht 
Assistant Professors Henson, Willse 

Courses for Undergraduates (ERM) 

517 Statistical Methods in Education (3:3) 

Pr. elementary algebra 
Introductory course in applied descriptive statistics, correlational 
methods, and linear regression that provides a conceptual and 
theoretical foundation for more advanced work and a thorough 
grounding in the use of computers for descriptive statistical anal- 
ysis, and interpretation of results. (Formerly ERM 617) 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 
for additional graduate-level courses. 



Department of English 

College of Arts & Sciences 

3143 Moore Humanities and Research Administration 

336/334-531 1 

www.uncg.edu/eng 

Facult\- 

Anne Wallace, Professor and Head of the Department 

Professors Baker, Beale, Chiseri-Strater, Cushman, Dischell, 

Evans, Ferguson, Gibson, C. Hodgkins, Kilcup, Langenfeld, 

Moraru, Nova, Parker, Romine, Roskelly, S. Yarbrough 
Associate Professors Keith, Myers, Ritter, Schultheis, Weyler 
Assistant Professors Applegarth, Cuda, Doiud, Feather, Jones, 

Morrissette, Rifkin, Roderick, Sanchez, Van, Vines 
Lecturers Clark, Littlejohn, Kennedy, Reynolds, Roberts, Seay, 

Swofford, Wliitaker 

The Department of English offers courses in major 
authors, in all major literary periods, in literary theory, in 
linguistics and rhetoric, in journalism, and in writing essays, 
fiction, and poetry. Senior-graduate courses are available to 
advanced students, and the graduate program offers the full 
range of literary and rhetorical studies leading to the M.A., 
M.Ed., and Ph.D. The creative writing program offers courses 
both to undergraduates seeking the B.A. degree and to gradu- 
ate students seeking the MFA degree. 

English Major (ENGL) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOS Codes: 

English, U155 

English with High School Teaching Licensure, U157 

The English Major provides a flexible program. Students 
who major in English participate in increasingly intensified 
study of language and literature that includes English, Amer- 
ican, and foreign literature in translation. Upon graduation, 
English majors are well qualified to enter nearly all fields that 
do not require previous technical and professional training. 

Although the English major is an excellent preparation 
for a variety of careers, many students will seek licensure to 
teach, and others will choose to enter graduate school. Eng- 
lish has long been recognized as a desirable major for prelaw 
and premedical studies. It is also beneficial for students who 
enter such fields as journalism, editing, communications, 
diplomacy, advertising, and personnel work. 

A "Guide for English Majors and Minors" is available 
upon request from the departmental office. It provides cur- 
rent advice on planning a major or minor. Additional guid- 
ance is available from the Director of Undergraduate Studies 
in English and from faculty advisors. 



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English 



Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies or suggests courses for: 
Literature (GLT) 3 

suggested: ENG 211 
One additional GLT course 3 

suggested: ENG 212 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 



Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 
a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

The department offers two major programs leading to the 
B.A. degree: "English" and "English— High School Teach- 
ing." Successful completion of the latter program qualifies 
the graduate to teach in high schools in North Carolina and 
other states with which North Carolina has reciprocal licen- 
sure agreements. A student may declare either major upon 
matriculation; to change one's major to English, or to change 
from one degree program to the other, one must have permis- 
sion of the department. (See the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies in English.) 

For both concentrations, a minimum of 30 semester hours 
of English above the 100 level is required. No requirement for 
the major may be met by a grade lower than C-. 

The courses must be distributed as follows in Section V. 

V Concentration Requirements 

English 

1. ENG 211, 212, 251. These courses provide an overview 
of English and American literature that gives per- 
spective and establishes a basis for choosing courses. 
Students should take these courses as early as possible, 
usually during the sophomore and junior years. 

2. ENG 303, Critical Approaches to the Study of Literature 

3. One course in language (ENG 260, 261, 262, 302, 321, 
513) or criticism (531, 549) or creative writing (221, 225, 
325, 326, 425, 426) or expository writing and journalism 
(219, 223, 319, 320, 322, 323, 327, 522, 524), or internship 
(401, 402) 

4. Four (4) courses in literature: 

• Two (2) 300-500 level courses in literature before 
1800, only one of which may be in Shakespeare 
(ENG 332, 336, 337, 338, 339 or 340, 342, 360, 372, 
381, 510, 537, 540, 541, 561) 

• Two (2) 300-500 level courses in literature after 1800 
(ENG 315, 331, 333, 344, 345, 346, 348, 349, 350, 351, 
352, 353, 358, 359, 373, 374, 376, 377, 378, 379, 382, 
545, 550, 558, 559, 563, 564, 565, 582) 

5. One or more courses in English at or above the 200 level 

English with High School Teaching Licensure 

1. English 211, 212, 251 

2. English 303 

3. English 321 

4. Four (4) courses in literature: 

• Two (2) 300-500 level courses in literature before 
1800, only one of which may be in Shakespeare 
(ENG 332, 336, 337, 338, 339 or 340, 342, 360, 372, 
381, 450, 510, 537, 540, 541, 561) 

• Two (2) 300-500 level courses in literature after 1800 
(ENG 315, 331, 333, 344, 345, 346, 348, 349, 350, 351, 
352, 353, 358, 359, 373, 374, 376, 377, 378, 379, 382, 
451, 545, 550, 558, 559, 563, 564, 565, 582) 

5. English 322 

Besides completing the above courses in English, can- 
didates for teaching licensure must meet additional require- 
ments, including admission to teacher education (end of 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



191 



English 



sophomore year) and to student teaching (junior year), suc- 
cessful completion of Praxis, and course work outside the 
English Department. For full current information about 
all requirements see Teacher Education Programs and the 
UNCG Teacher Education Handbook. Note: admission to 
teacher education and student teaching in English requires 
a minimum grade point average of 2.75, overall and in the 
major. 

VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

Honors in English 

Requirements 

Twelve (12) semester hours to consist of: 

1. Nine (9) s.h. of Honors course work, at least six (6) 
of which must be in English. Honors course work 
may consist of any combination of the following 
options: 

• English Honors courses above the 100 level, 
including ENG 494: Honors Seminar 

• ENG 493: Honors Work 

• Contract Honors courses in English at the 300 
level or above 

• Any 500-level course in English 

• Any other Honors course outside of the Eng- 
lish department (up to 3 s.h.) 

2. Three (3) s.h. of HSS 490: Senior Honors Project 

Qualifications 

• A grade of at least B in all course work used to satisfy 
the Honors requirement in English 

• A declared English Major 

• At least a 3.30 overall GPA at graduation 

Recognition 

Students who complete the program will be recognized 
at a banquet held at the end of the spring semester. The desig- 
nation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in English" and the 
title of the Senior Honors Project will be printed on the stu- 
dent's official transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

Contact the Department of English for further informa- 
tion and guidance about Honors in English. See Honors Pro- 
grams in this chapter for more information. 

English as a Second Major 
Required: minimum of 30 semester hours 

Students must complete the requirements described 
above for the English major (30 s.h.). 

English as a Second Academic Concentration 
for Elementary Education and Special 
Education Majors 
Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

The department also offers an 18-hour second academic 
concentration in English that meets requirements for Elemen- 
tary Education and Special Education (School of Education) 



and certain other University programs in education. Consult 
with your major advisor or with the Director of Undergradu- 
ate Studies in English. Education students who are required 
to complete another approved concentration in a basic aca- 
demic discipline, must fulfill the following requirements (18 
s.h.) for a second academic concentration in English. 

1. Required core courses (9 s.h.)— three (3) courses from 
the following: ENG 211, 212, 251, 252 

2. Either 321 or 262 or 302 for 3 s.h. 

3. Two (2) electives at the 200 or 300 level for 6 s.h. 

English as a Second Academic Concentration 
for Middle Grades Education Majors 
Required: minimum of 27 semester hours 

Middle Grades Education majors must fulfill the follow- 
ing requirements (27 semester hours) for a second academic 
concentration in English. Consult with your major advisor or 
with the Director of Undergraduate Studies in English. 

1. English and American Literature (9 s.h.), three courses 
from the following: ENG 211, 212, 251, 252 

2. Language and Writing (6 s.h.): ENG 321 and 322 

3. Expressive Writing (3 s.h.), one course from the follow- 
ing: ENG 221, 223, 225, 323, 325, 326 

4. Literature (6 s.h.), two courses chosen from English 
courses at the 200 or 300 level, in consultation with 
major advisor, from the following: ENG 332, 336, 337, 
338, 339, 340, 342, 360, 372, 381, 510, 537, 539, 540, 541, 
542, 561, 315, 331, 333, 344, 345, 346, 348, 349, 350, 351, 
352, 353, 355, 358, 359, 372, 373, 374, 376, 377, 378, 379, 
382. 

5. Elective (3 s.h.), chosen from literature or writing 
courses at the 200 or 300 level (items 3 and 4 above), in 
consultation with major advisor 

English Minor 

Required: minimum 18 semester hours 

AOSCode: U155 

ENG 101 and 102 satisfy the College Reasoning and Dis- 
course (CRD) requirement and do not, therefore, count as 
part of the semester hours for an English minor. 

English minors have wide choice among courses offered 
in fulfilling the minimum of 18 hours in English. They are 
urged, however, to report to the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies as early as possible for help in planning a program. 

Requirements: 

1 . Any two courses, to be chosen by the student, from 
among the following: ENG 201, 202, 211, 212, 251, 
252 

2. No more than six s.h. at the 100 level (but see head 
note, above); and at least six s.h. at the 300 level or 
above. 

For information on licensure toward a high school Eng- 
lish endorsement, fulfilling the English minor requirements, 
see the Director of English Education. 



192 



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English 



English Courses (ENG) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

100 Basic Writing (3:3) 

• Does not fulfill the University writing requirement. 

• Credit does not apply toward graduation nor count in the 
student's GPA. 

Instruction and practice in basic writing skills, in preparation for 
101. Admission to the course is by advice of the Director of Com- 
position on the basis of SAT scores and placement testing. 

101 English Composition I (3:3) 

GECore: GRD 

• Equivalent credit to FMS 115/RCO 101. Students may not 
receive credit for both ENG 101 and either FMS 115 or RCO 101. 

Students read and write in varied forms, styles, and lengths. 
Goals include developing ideas and revising writing, experi- 
menting with aims and approaches in producing writing, and 
understanding appeals to various audiences. (Fall & Spring) 

102 English Composition II (3:3) 

GECore: GRD 

Pr. 101, or FMS 115 or RCO 101 

• Equivalent credit to FMS 116/RCO 102; students may not 
receive credit for ENG 102 and either FMS 116 or RCO 102. 

Emphasizes developing ideas and supporting varied writing 
tasks. Goals include effective uses of evidence, control in style 
and voice, understanding varied forms and perspectives. (Fall 
& Spring) 

103 Essentials of Professional and Business Writing (3:3) 

Pr. ENG 101 
Focus: written skills needed for workplace success. Emphasizes pro- 
cess strategies for clear, concise, and accurate messages. Develops 
skills in producing professional documents, analyzing the writing of 
others, and collaborating on written assignments. (Fall & Spring) 

104 Approach to Literature (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT 
Critical reading and analysis of fiction, poetry and drama with 
an emphasis on a variety of major themes and their relevance to 
contemporary life. (Fall & Spring) 

105 Introduction to Narrative (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT 
Critical reading and analysis of American and British novels, 
short stories, and narrative poems. Attention to historical, cul- 
tural, and literary backgrounds as appropriate. (Fall & Spring) 

106 Introduction to Poetry (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT 
Critical reading and analysis of British and American lyric, dra- 
matic, and narrative poetry. Attention to historical, cultural, and 
literary backgrounds as appropriate. (Fall & Spring) 

107 Introduction to Drama (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT 
Critical reading and analysis of British and American drama. 
Attention to historical, cultural, and literary backgrounds, espe- 
cially the Continental dramatic background, as appropriate. 
(Fall & Spring) 



108 Topics in British and American Literature (3:3) 

GECore: GLT 
Variable topics. Offerings may include Southern Writers, The 
Mystery Novel, Women Writers, The Imperial Imagination, and 
Grail Literature. (Alt Years) 

109 Introduction to Shakespeare (3:3) 

GECore: GLT 
Intensive study of a limited number of plays (and perhaps some 
sonnets) using such approaches as textual analysis, historical 
material, filmed versions, attendance at productions, discussion, 
writing, and performance study. (Fall & Spring) 

110 World Literature in English (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Introductory survey of literature written in English by authors 
from regions outside the United States and the British Isles — the 
West Indies, India, Canada, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. 
(Alt Years) 

111 Introduction to Linguistics (3:3) 

Introductory study of the science of language: principles of 
sound, meaning, structure, use, and the interactions of language 
and society. (Fall) (Same as CCI 111 and LIN 111) 

201 European Literary Classics: Ancient to Renaissance 
(3:3) 

GE Core: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Critical reading and analysis of works in translation: Homer, 
Dante, Cervantes, and others. (Fall & Spring) 

202 European Literary Classics: Enlightenment to Modern 
(3:3) 

GE Core: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Critical reading and analysis of works in translation: Moliere, 
Goethe, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Kafka, and others. (Fall & Spring) 

203 Academic English for Speakers of Other Languages 
(3:3) 

• Restricted to students whose first language is not English. 

• Does not satisfy the University composition requirement. 
Emphasis on the active use of language skills: speaking, listen- 
ing, reading, writing. (Fall & Spring) 

204 Non-Western Literary Classics (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GN 

Reading and analysis of the most influential literary texts of Non- 
Western cultures, ancient through modern; readings include 
translations of prose and poetry from Asia, the Middle East, and 
Africa. 

208 Topics in Global Literature (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Variable topics, with emphasis on regional interconnections. 
Offerings may include Europe at War, World Women Writers, Lit- 
erature and Revolution, and Holocaust Literature. (Alt Years) 

209 Topics in Non-Western Literature (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GN 

Variable topics, with emphasis on regional interconnections. 
Offerings may include South Asian Diaspora, Postcolonial Child- 
hood, Afro-Caribbean Writers, and Australasian Writers. (Alt 
Years) 

210 Literature and the Arts (3:3) 
GE Core: GLT 

Exploration of the relationships between literary and extralit- 
erary arts such as music, visual arts, cinema, and architecture. 
Extraliterary focus will vary. (Alt Years) 



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211 Major British Authors: Medieval to Neoclassical (3:3) 

GECore: GLT 

Pr. sophomore standing, or English major, or permission of 
instructor 
Major poets, dramatists, satirists read within the context of their 
times: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Swift, and others. 
(Fall & Spring) 

212 Major British Authors: Romantic to Modern (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT 

Pr. sophomore standing, or English major, or permission of 
instructor 
Major authors of the Romantic, Victorian and Modern periods 
studied in relation to their times and traditions: Wordsworth, 
Tennyson, Yeats, Joyce, and others. (Fall & Spring) 

219 Journalism I: Fundamentals of Newswriting (3:3) 
Introduction to newspaper journalism. Emphasis on basic news- 
writing and reporting. Combines writing workshop and lecture. 
(Fall & Spring) 

221 Writing of Poetry: Introductory (3:3) 

Pr. satisfaction of GLT requirement 
Introductory workshop in writing poetry for students beyond the 
freshman year. 

223 Writing of Essays (3:3) 

Pr. 101 or exemption 
Course in reading and writing the essay, with particular attention 
to style and voice. (Fall & Spring) 

225 Writing of Fiction: Introductory (3:3) 

Pr. satisfaction of GLT requirement 
Introductory workshop in writing fiction for students beyond the 
freshman year. 

235 Science Fiction (3:3) 

Historical and critical study of science fiction in the twentieth 
century. 

236 Genre Fiction (3:3) 

Selected writers from a popular kind (genre) of fiction, such as 
horror, spy, crime, fantasy, sports. Topic to vary. 

251 Major American Authors: Colonial to Romantic (3:3) 

GECore: GLT 

Pr. sophomore standing, or English major, or permission of 
instructor 
Classic authors and their contributions to the intellectual life of 
America: Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Poe, Whitman, Dick- 
inson, and others. (Fall & Spring) 

252 Major American Authors: Realist to Modern (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT 

Pr. sophomore standing, English major, or permission of instructor 
Late nineteenth- and twentieth-century authors and their con- 
tributions to the development of modern thought: Dickinson, 
Twain, Frost, Faulkner, Hemingway, and others. (Fall & Spring) 

260 Introduction to the English Language (3:3) 

Relationship between the English language as a system and indi- 
vidual uses of language. Techniques for describing language, 
theories about language, and introduction to the structure and 
history of English. (Fall) 

261 Dialects of American English (3:3) 

Consideration of the historical, geographical, and social factors 
which have influenced the varieties of modern American English, 
the methodology of dialect study, and the representation of dia- 
lects in American literature. 



262 Sociolinguistics (3:3) 

GECore: GSB 
Introduction to language in its sociocultural context. Topics 
include geographical and social dialects, language and identity, 
domains of language use, language attitudes, and the nature of 
multilingual societies. (Alt) (Same as LIN 262) 

302 Second Language Acquisition (3:3) 

Survey of language acquisition theories, including first and sec- 
ond language development issues; theoretical and pedagogical 
approaches to working with linguistically and culturally diverse 
learners. (Alt) (Same as LIN 302) 

303 Critical Approaches to the Study of Literature (3:3) 

Introduction to critical approaches to literature. Guidelines for 
and practice in writing about literature. (Fall & Spring) 

311, 312 Literary Studies Abroad (3:3), (3:3) 
Selected literary topics — themes, authors, genres, periods— with 
emphasis on their relationships to physical and cultural settings 
associated with the literature. Residence abroad. (Summer) 

315 Postcolonial Literatures (3:3) 

GECore: GLT 

Pr. sophomore standing or higher 
Literature from South Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, and 
Canada marked by the experience of European colonialism. Top- 
ics include non-European literary forms, colonization, political 
resistance, nationalism, gender, postcolonial predicaments. 

316 Studies in Human Rights and Literature (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 
Exploration of how literature treats human rights violations and 
how human rights norms shape stories. Topics will vary and may 
include such subjects as genocide, hunger, child soldiers, censor- 
ship, torture. 

318 Journalism IV: Advanced Reporting and Writing (3:3) 

Pr.ENG219 
This course focuses on developing advanced skills in print and 
online journalism. Students will pursue projects in investiga- 
tive and feature writing, as well as computer-assisted reporting. 
(Fall or Spring) 

319 Journalism II: Editing the Newspaper (3:3) 

Pr. 219 or permission of instructor 
Values and practices in newspaper editing. Emphasis on eth- 
ics, editing skills, newspaper design, and writing editorials. 
(Spring) 

320 Journalism III: Feature Writing and Reviewing (3:3) 

Pr. 219 or permission of instructor 
Writing workshop: values and journalistic practices in writing 
feature articles and reviews; includes book reviewing and critical 
writing on other arts. 

321 Linguistics for Teachers (3:3) 

Introduction to formal study of the English language, including 
intensive review of structural and transformational grammars. 
Other topics of interest to teachers of English, including geo- 
graphical and social dialects and teaching composition. Course 
satisfies a State requirement for prospective English teachers. 
(Fall & Spring) 

322 The Teaching of Writing (3:3) 

Pr. University Reasoning and Discourse requirements must already 
have been met. For students seeking licensure in English, it is 
recommended that 321 be taken first. 
Principles of written discourse with a survey of techniques of 
teaching composition. Instruction in composing, editing, and 
criticizing written discourse. (Fall & Spring) 



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323 Literary Nonfiction (3:3) 

Pr. completion of Reasoning and Discourse requirement 
Workshop in writing essays and other types of nonfiction with 
emphasis on audience and style. 

325 Writing of Fiction: Intermediate (3:3) 
Pr. 225 or permission of instructor 

Continuation of introductory workshop in writing fiction for stu- 
dents beyond the freshman year. 

326 Writing of Poetry: Intermediate (3:3) 

Pr. 221 or permission of instructor 
Continuation of introductory workshop in writing poetry for stu- 
dents beyond the freshman year. 

327 Writing in the Professions (3:3) 

Pr. University Reasoning and Discourse requirement must already 
have been met. 
Principles of clarity, precision, audience analysis, document 
design, collaboration, and usability applied to a variety of profes- 
sional writing tasks. May include elements of visual design, Web 
site design, or grant writing. (Fall & Spring) 

329 Literature and Film (3:3) 

Selected short stories, novels, plays, film scripts and their film 
versions, with emphasis on rendering literary values into film. 

331 Women in Literature (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT 
Study of women as readers, writers, and characters in literature. 
Attention to questions of literary canon and to women's position 
in drama, the novel, and poetry. (Fall & Spring) 

332 English Women Writers before 1800 (3:3) 

Pr. 211 
Study of the literary and social significance of texts written in 
various genres by English women prior to 1800. 

333 Southern Writers (3:3) 

Fiction, poetry, drama of the modern and contemporary South. 
Emphasis on Southern perspectives, values, traditions. Faulkner, 
Welty, Wright, Tate, O'Connor, Percy, and others. 

336 Introduction to Chaucer (3:3) 

Pr.for advanced undergraduates 
Chaucer's major poetry examined within the context of medieval 
cultural traditions. Readings in the early dream visions, Troilus 
and Criseyde, and selected Canterbury Tales. Attention given to 
language and pronunciation. 

337 English Literature to 1500 (3:3) 

Culture of the Middle Ages. Selected reading in English litera- 
ture from Beowulf to Malory. Works in Anglo-Saxon and some in 
Middle English in translation. 

338 The Sixteenth Century 1500-1610 (3:3) 

Earlier English Renaissance lyric, romance, prose, and drama; 
study of humanist backgrounds and contexts; emphasis on devel- 
opment of thought and style. 

339 Shakespeare: Early Plays and Sonnets (3:3) 

GECore: GLT 
A selection of representative plays including Romeo and Juliet, A 
Midsummer Night's Dream, 1 Henry IV, Much Ado about Noth- 
ing, Henry V, and Hamlet. (Fall & Spring) 

340 Shakespeare: Later Plays (3:3) 

GECore: GLT 
A selection of representative plays, including Othello, King Lear, 
Macbeth, Anthony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure, and The 
Tempest. (Fall & Spring) 



341 Themes in Literature (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when theme varies. 
Study of a major theme in literature of general interest. Through 
a variety of sources, mainly literature, but including art, film, his- 
tory, and music, the class will explore the dimensions and com- 
plexities of the theme. 

342 The Seventeenth Century (3:3) 

Main lines of thought and style noted in major writers of the later 
Renaissance from Donne and Jonson through Milton. Emphasis 
on lyric and metaphysical poetry. 

344 Romantic Poetry and Poetics (3:3) 

Intensive study of works by Wordsworth, Coleridge, the Shel- 
leys, Keats, and Byron, with attention to development of Roman- 
tic movement. 

345 Victorian Literature (3:3) 

Major Victorian writings: poems by the Brownings, Tennyson, 
the Rossettis, and others; prose works by Carlyle, Arnold, Mill, 
and others. 

346 English Literature from Victorian to Modern (3:3) 
Critical study of English literature from the end of Victorian 
period to beginning of the modern era. Features such writers as 
Pater, Wilde, Yeats, Shaw, Hardy, Conrad, Ford, and Wells. 

348 Contemporary British Literature and Culture (3:3) 
Post-1945 British literature in cultural, political/historical context. 
Topics include history, social class, sexuality, gender, race, immi- 
gration, post-imperial nostalgia, realism, the legacy of modern- 
ism, postmodernism, and cultural studies. 

349 English Novel from Defoe to Hardy (3:3) 

Introduction to the great tradition of the English novel. Selected 
novels by Fielding, Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, and others. 

350 The Twentieth-Century English Novel (3:3) 

Development of the English novel from Conrad through end of 
World War II, featuring such writers as Forster, Lawrence, Joyce, 
Woolf, Huxley, and Greene. 

351 The American Novel through World War I (3:3) 

Historical and critical study of Hawthorne, Stowe, Twain, Alcott, 
Chesnutt, James, Johnson, and others. 

352 The Twentieth-Century American Novel (3:3) 

Historical and critical study of Wharton, Cather, Fitzgerald, 
Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, Wright, Welty, and others. (Fall 
& Spring) 

353 The Contemporary Novel (3:3) 

Historical and critical study of Updike, McCarthy, Gaddis, Mor- 
rison, Tan, Pynchon, and others. 

358 Modern Poetry (3:3) 

Poets and schools of poetry, British and American, from 1915 to 
1945, with emphasis on the great variety of styles and subjects. 

359 Contemporary Poetry (3:3) 

British and American poetry 1945 to present. Emphasis on themes 
and styles, with particular attention given to classical sources, 
world history, and modern innovations in technique. (Spring) 

360 The Eighteenth Century (3:3) 

Major writers of the Restoration and eighteenth century in a his- 
torical, literary, and cultural context: Dryden, Behn, Pope, Swift, 
Johnson, and others. 



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371 Literary Study of the Bible (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GL 

The Bible as part of the world's great literature. Designed to give 
students a better comprehension of the Bible through study of its 
origins, history structure, and literary qualities. 

372 Early American Literature (3:3) 

Literature in the New World to 1820. Topics include exploration 
and contact, Puritanism, the Great Awakening, the Revolution, 
and the rise of captivity and travel narratives and the novel. 

(Alt) 

373 American Romanticism (3:3) 

Survey of selected major romantic writers, c. 1800-1900: Irving, 
Bryant, Cooper, Prescott, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, and authors 
from the Brahmin and Transcendentalist groups. Authors and 
topics will vary. (Alt) 

374 Early African American Writers (3:3) 

Critical survey of the traditions, ideas, techniques, and directions 
of African American writing from its beginnings to the early Har- 
lem Renaissance. 

375 Topics in Native American Writing (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

Exploration of the writings and cultural production, in any 
period, of Indigenous peoples on lands claimed by the United 
States. 

376 African American Writers after the 1920s (3:3) 

Critical survey of the traditions, thought, and directions of Afri- 
can American writing from the late Harlem Renaissance to the 
present. 

377 American Realism and Naturalism (3:3) 

Survey of major realistic and naturalistic writers, c. 1860-1920: 
Stowe, Twain, Howells, James, Chopin, Dreiser, Chesnutt, Whar- 
ton, Glasgow, and others. Authors and topics will vary (Alt) 

378 American Life-Writing (3:3) 

Survey of various forms of American life-writing, such as auto- 
biographies, diaries, letters, journals, tribal history, narrative 
poetry, and travel writing; and affiliated critical work. 

379 American Women's Writing (3:3) 

Survey of a particular area, period, theme, or genre of American 
women's writing and affiliated critical work. 

380 Literature and the Environment (3:3) 

Exploration of some important post-1800 literary texts about 
"nature," of ecocritical theories, and of affiliated social move- 
ments, with particular attention to place-based differences. 
(Spring) 

381 English Drama to 1800 (3:3) 

Critical, cultural, and historical study of the English drama — 
excluding Shakespeare — from medieval plays to eighteenth- 
century comedy: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Dryden, Congreve, 
Sheridan, and others. 

382 Modern British and American Drama (3:3) 
Historical and critical survey of British and American drama 1890 
to the present: Shaw, O'Neill, Yeats, Synge, Pinter, Miller, Wil- 
liams, and others. 

383 Topics in Queer Studies (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

Exploration of the writings and cultural production, in any 
period, through the lens of queer studies. (Alt) 



390 Studies in Writing Center Theory and Practice (3:2:3) 
Principles of writing center theory, including writing center history, 
philosophy, and pedagogy; training of writing center consultants 
and experience in teaching writing in individualized or small-group 
tutorial sessions. (Fall & Spring) 

401 Internship in Journalism and Editing (3:0:8) 

Pr. English major; junior standing or higher; 3.0 cumulative GPA; 
recommendation of UNCG journalism instructor and permission 
of the Internship Coordinator 
Field experience for senior English majors with a newspaper or 
magazine publisher. Academic supervision provided by Intern- 
ship Coordinator and direction in field provided by job supervi- 
sor. (Fall & Spring & Summer) 

402 Internship in English Studies (3:0:8) 

Pr. English major; junior standing or higher; 3.0 cumulative 
GPA; recommendation of UNCG English faculty member and 
permission of the Internship Coordinator 
Field experience for advanced English majors in jobs related to 
English studies. Academic supervision provided by Internship 
Coordinator and direction in field provided by job supervisor. 
(Fall & Spring & Summer) 

425 Writing of Fiction: Advanced (3:3) 

Pr. 325 or permission of instructor 
Advanced workshop in writing fiction. Discussion of student fic- 
tion supplemented by readings of fiction and essays about fiction 
by historical and contemporary masters of the genre. 

426 Writing of Poetry: Advanced (3:3) 

Pr. 326 or permission of instructor 
Advanced workshop in writing poetry. Discussion of student 
poetry supplemented by readings of poetry and essays about 
poetry by historical and contemporary masters of the genre. 

450 Pre-1800 Literature Senior Seminar (3:3) 

Pr. senior standing and English major, or permission of instructor 
Variable topic seminar course intended for senior English 
majors. 

451 Post-1800 Literature Senior Seminar (3:3) 

Pr. senior standing and English major, or permission of instructor 
Variable topic seminar course intended for senior English 
majors. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 

major 
• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

494 Honors Seminar (3:3) 

Pr. English major with upperclass standing, and either enrollment 
in the Honors Programs or a minimum 3.30 overall GPA 
Study of an important topic in Literature, Criticism, Theory, or 
Rhetoric. (Fall) 

499 Experimental Course: Advanced Composition, 
Rhetorical Power (3:3) 

Pr. ENG 101 or equivalent 
Designed to engage writers in developing writing skill and inter- 
pretive understanding by studying the uses and abuses of rheto- 
ric in the world of texts and images that surround us. (Offered 
fall '08) 



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Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

Prerequisite for credit in all courses in literature listed below: 
successful completion of at least six s.h. of approved courses 
in English and American literature at the 300 level or above. 
510 Old English (3:3) 

Language and literature of the Anglo-Saxon period (A.D. 600- 
1100). The language is studied primarily in conjunction with lit- 
erary texts in the context of their history and culture. 

513 History of the English Language (3:3) 

Origins and development of the English language, methods of 
historical language study and competing theories of linguistic 
change. Practical emphasis on reading and analysis of texts in 
Old, Middle, and Early Modern English. 

522 Teaching Composition: Theories and Applications (3:3) 

• 321 or 660 recommended. 

Theories of the composing process and of discourse generally as 
they apply to the problems of teaching composition. Background 
studies in language and other related areas. Specific approaches 
to teaching composition, their rationales and their comparative 
usefulness. 

524 Writing— Advanced: Analytical and Technical (3:3) 

Problems of organization and expression in books, articles, and 
reports. For those writing for publication or whose work in busi- 
ness or government requires a great deal of writing. 

531 Feminist Theory and Women Writers (3:3) 

Examines gender and creativity, women's place in literary tradi- 
tion, and connections among art, gender, race, and class. Focuses 
on contemporary theory and on literary works from one histori- 
cal period. 

537 Middle English Literature (3:3) 

Language and literature of the thirteenth-, fourteenth-, and fif- 
teenth-century England. 

540 Shakespeare (3:3) 

Major comedies, histories, tragedies selected for topical study. 
Related background readings and criticism. 

541 Milton (3:3) 

Milton's major poems and his most important prose works in 
their seventeenth-century setting. 

545 Nineteenth-Century British Writers (3:3) 

Major Romantic and/or Victorian writers. Attention to poetry and 
prose. 

549 The Critical Canon and Contemporary Issues (3:3) 
Important critical writings from ancient Greece through the nine- 
teenth century, emphasizing their influence upon modern theory 
and practice. 

550 Modern British Writers (3:3) 

Major novelists, poets, and playwrights of the modernist period. 

553 Topics in English Studies (3:3) 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 

Studies in selected topics in English or American literature or lan- 
guage. 

558 American Poetry After 1900 (3:3) 

Critical and historical study of major twentieth-century Ameri- 
can poets to World War II. 

559 Twentieth-Century British Poetry (3:3) 

Critical and historical study of twentieth-century British poetry 
to World War II. 



561 Eighteenth-Century British Writers (3:3) 

Selected major writers, 1660-1800, from among Dryden, Swift, 
Pope, Johnson, and others. 

563 American Poetry Before 1900 (3:3) 

American poetry and related critical theory with special empha- 
sis on Taylor, Poe, Emerson, Whitman, and Dickinson. 

564 American Prose Before 1900 (3:3) 

Genres, themes, and movements of American prose, fiction and 
non-fiction, written before 1900. 

565 American Prose After 1900 (3:3) 

American prose written after 1900, with an emphasis on histori- 
cal context, prose traditions in America, and the development of 
form, style, and genre. 

582 Modern Drama (3:3) 

Drama of late nineteenth century and twentieth century, conti- 
nental, English, and American. 

590 Literacy, Learning, and Fieldwork (4:3:3) 

Examines the historical, pedagogical, ideological and theoretical 
threads of literacy studies, debates and programs. Includes train- 
ing/tutoring fieldwork in local literacy programs, primarily in the 
public libraries. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for additional graduate-level courses. 



Entrepreneurship 

Office of the Provost 

BELL Program Office 

1604 Moore Humanities and Research Administration 

336/334-9701 

http://entrepreneur.uncg.edu 

BELL Advisory Committee 

David Arneke, Division of University Advancement 

Bonnie Canziani, Department of Recreation, Tourism, and 

Hospitality Management 
Anthony Chow, Department of Library and Information Studies 
Jim Clark, Department of English 

Patricia Crane, Department of Adult Health, School of Nursing 
Ruth DeHoog, Department of Political Science 
Joe Erba, Department of Business Administration 
David Holley, School of Music 
John Lee Jellicorse, Department of Media Studies 
Tim Johnston, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
Spoma Jovanovic, Department of Communication Studies 
Jerry McGuire, Office of Technology Transfer 
Promod Pratap, Department of Physics and Astronomy 
Laura Sims, School of Human Environmental Sciences 
Rosemary Wander, Associate Provost for Research and Public/ 

Private Sector Partnerships 
Jim Weeks, Dean, Bryan School of Business and Economics 
Dianne Welsh, Bryan School of Business and Economics 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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BELL (Building Entrepreneurial Learning for Life) is a 
campus-wide, cross-disciplinary collaboration involving the 
College of Arts and Sciences, all of UNCG's six professional 
schools, and the Office of Research and Public/Private Sector 
Partnerships. Entrepreneurship is defined as the process of 
creating new enterprises that are sustainable and build value, 
whether they be for-profit or not-for-profit, economic, social, 
artistic, cultural, educational, or intellectual. Requirements 
for the Entrepreneurship minor are found in the Business 
Administration section of this Bulletin. Courses cross-listed 
with the entrepreneurship (ENT) prefix are listed below and 
within the section of their originating department. These 
courses support the mission of BELL: to fuel the entrepre- 
neurial spirit, thinking, and actions of students and faculty 
across the campus by fostering a culture of creative confi- 
dence, competence, and courage. 

Entrepreneurship Courses (ENT) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

196 Media Workshop (1:2) 

• May be repeated for a total of 3 hours. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Examination of specific aspects of broadcasting, film, and other 
media as provided by screenings and by instruction of industry 
professionals. (Fall & Spring) (Same as MST 196) 

200 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance (3:3) 

Introduction to problems and methods in business finance within 
the context of entrepreneurial ventures. Topics include business 
formation, sources of financing, financial statements, business 
valuation, budgeting, and measuring financial performance. 
(Summer) (Same as FIN 200) 

201 Creativity, Innovation, and Vision (3:3) 
GECore: GSB 

Creativity and innovation is examined through an interdisciplin- 
ary lens. We examine how creative and innovative thinking gives 
us the vision to see opportunities and how they impact society. 
(Fall & Spring) (Same as BUS 201) 

204 Experimental Course: Entrepreneurial Bootcamp (3:3) 

Provides students, in an intensive environment, with an assess- 
ment of their entrepreneurial potential and an introduction to the 
business discipline needed to convert potential into a sustainable 
endeavor. (Offered summer '08) (Same as BUS 204) 

206 Campus Entrepreneurs (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing; admission to an approved program 
Students learn the basics of establishing a new business from idea 
to inception through the finalized business plan. Students may 
have the opportunity to establish a viable business on campus. 
(Same as BUS 206; formerly ENT 306) 

215 The Economics of Entrepreneurship (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Study of entrepreneurship from history of economic thought 
perspective and application of such concepts to economic agents. 
Emphasis on economic thought, market activity, and economic 
growth. (Spring) (Same as ECO 215) 



240 Introduction to the Entrepreneurial Experience (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing; admission to an approved program 
Introduction to the entrepreneurial experience including historical 
perspectives, the role of entrepreneurs in supporting the economy, 
the entrepreneurial process, venture creation, and innovation. 
(Same as BUS 240) 

290 Entrepreneurship and the Internet (3:3) 

Pr. MGT/ENT 240 or BUS/ENT 206 
This introductory course provides students with the theoretical 
and practical foundation needed to become an entrepreneur able 
to conceive and develop business plans to create a new venture 
on the Internet. (Spring) (Same as ISM 290) 

291 Entrepreneurship and Technology in Health Care (3:3) 

Pr. junior standing; admission to an approved program 
Introduces how technology helps create new business ventures 
in the health care industry. Health care delivery processes and 
mechanisms relevant to turning ideas into profitable opportuni- 
ties will be addressed. (Summer) (Same as ISM 291) 

292 IT Entrepreneurship (3:3) 

Pr. ISM 280 or BUS/ENT 240; admission to an approved program 
Fundamentals of advanced technologies are presented and entre- 
preneurial skills needed to manage the challenges inherent in 
attempting to take advantage of innovations driven from those 
technologies are discussed. (Same as ISM 292) 

300 Ideas to Opportunities: Feasibility Analysis (3:3) 

Pr. ENT/FIN 200 or ENT/FIN 315; or permission of instructor 
Provides the knowledge and skills to develop a feasibility plan 
for a new business venture that will be the basis for developing a 
business plan. (Fall & Spring) (Same as BUS 300) 

312 Economics of Technology (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 101 or 201 
Economic analysis of technological change. Topics include 
sources of productivity, inventive activity, entrepreneurship, 
innovation strategy, R&D management, patenting, and technol- 
ogy assessment. (Fall) (Same as ECO 312) 

335 Entrepreneurial Finance (3:3) 

Pr. FIN 315 
This course focuses on financial analysis, financial forecasting, 
financing, capital costs, and working capital management of 
start-up businesses and existing businesses in the early stages of 
development. (Fall) (Same as FIN 335) 

336 Opportunities to Action: Business Plan (3:3) 

Pr. ENT/BUS 300 
Provides the knowledge and skills to develop a feasibility plan 
into a business plan for a new venture, which culminates in a 
business plan competition. (Fall & Spring) (Same as BUS 336) 

337 Family Business (3:3) 

Overview of family business, including what is required for fam- 
ily harmony and business continuity. (Fall) (Same as BUS 337) 

338 Franchising (3:3) 

This course introduces the student to opportunities in franchising 
including becoming a franchisee or franchisor. (Fall) (Same as 
BUS 338) 

339 Entrepreneurial Leadership (3:3) 

Leadership theories, skills, and practices necessary for effective- 
ness in varied entrepreneurial settings, including private busi- 
nesses, corporations, not-for-profit organizations, and social 
movements. (Summer) (Same as BUS 339) 



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340 Social Entrepreneurship (3:3) 

Pr. sophomore standing; admission to an approved program 
Introduction to social entrepreneurship including identification 
of social problems and how they are solved through innovation, 
community impact, sustainability, ethical, scalable, economic 
value creation, and risk-taking efforts. (Fall & Spring) (Same as 
BUS 340) 

342 International Entrepreneurship (3:3) 
Creation and management of business ventures with interna- 
tional dimensions are examined, and economic and formal/infor- 
mal institutions affecting entrepreneurship are discussed. (Same 
as BUS 342) 
354 Entrepreneurship in Hospitality and Tourism (3:3) 

Pr. HTM 151, ACC 201, ECO 201, MAT 112 or equivalent 
Principles of hospitality entrepreneurship and hospitality business 
investment. Exploration of hospitality and tourism case studies to 
determine risks and rewards of investment in hospitality business 
concepts. (Fall) (Same as HTM 354) 

403 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3:3) 

Pr. grade ofC or better in MGT 312 or MKT 320; senior standing; 
admission to approved program 
Focuses on marketing strategy, planning, and tactics for entrepre- 
neurial firms. Addresses general marketing issues and specific 
"real world" marketing problems. Entrepreneurial firms serve 
as clients for student consulting teams. (Spring) (Same as MKT 
403) 

450 Directed Business Practice in Entrepreneurship 
(1-4:1:3-12) 

Pr. junior standing; permission of instructor 

• Open to all majors. 

Planned work experience approved in advance by instructor. 
Regularly scheduled class attendance as well as reading, writing, 
and skill practice assignments are required. (Same as BUS 450) 

470 Entrepreneurial Small Business Management (3:3) 

Pr. MKT 320, FIN 315, SCM 302; admission to an approved 
program 
Application of management and entrepreneurship to small/ 
medium business both in the start-up and growth phases. 
Requirements for successful operation of an entrepreneurial 
small business. (Fall) (Same as BUS 470) 

496 Advanced Media Workshop (1:2) 

• May be repeated for a total of 3 s.h. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Leadership role in examination of aspects of broadcasting, film, 
and other media through screenings and by instruction of indus- 
try professionals. (Fall & Spring) (Same as MST 496) 

499 Selected Topics in Entrepreneurship (1-3) 

Pr. junior standing; permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Study of topics of common interest to those interested in entre- 
preneurship. Group discussion and study rather than independent 
study emphasized. Generally non-recurring topics studied. (Same 
as BUS 499) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 



Environmental Studies Program 

College of Arts & Sciences 

219 Graham Building 

336/256-0520 

www.uncg.edu/env 

Committee Members 

Susan Buck, Director, Environmental Studies Program 

Aaron Allen, School of Music 

Bruce Banks, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Erick Byrd, Department of Recreation, Tourism, and Hospitality 

Management 
Stephen Holland, Department of Economics 
Karen Kilcup, Department of English 
Bruce Kirchojf, Department of Biology 
Jay Lennartson, Department of Geography 
Bill Markham, Department of Sociology 
Greg O'Brien, Department of History 
Jennifer Paige, Office of Waste Reduction and Recycling 
Mark Schulz, Department of Public Health Education 

Environmental studies is an interdisciplinary field foster- 
ing understanding of the natural physical and biological set- 
ting in which life on Earth exists. It integrates scientific study 
of ecosystems, pollution, climate, energy, and other environ- 
mental and natural resource matters on a global, regional or 
local scale with cultural and policy-related study of politics, 
economics, sociology, history, and law. 

The Environmental Studies major is designed to pro- 
vide students with a broad exposure to topics related to the 
environment and to provide knowledge and skills to address 
major environmental issues. Students interested in the major 
should work closely with their advisors to ensure that they 
meet prerequisites for upper division courses. In particular, 
students planning to take upper division biology courses 
should register for BIO 111/112 rather than for BIO 105/105L. 

Special Programs in Liberal Studies Major — 

Concentration in Environmental Studies 

(SPLS) 

Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level. 

AOSCode: U825 

Requirements 
I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 



589 Experimental Course: Theatre Entrepreneurship (3:3) 

Entrepreneurial concepts applied to the formation and manage- 
ment of a new theatre/performing arts company. (Offered fall 
'08) 



Core Category 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 

Fine Arts (GFA) 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 

2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



S.H. 

6 
3 
3 
3 

199 



Environmental Studies 



Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have 
a different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and 
one additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers; at least one 
course must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences 3—4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four (4) WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

A. Core courses (minimum of 22 s.h.) 

1. BIO105/105L*orlll* 

2. CHE 101* or 103/110* or 111/112* 

3. ENV 100 

4. GEO 103* or 106/106L* 

5. STA 108* or 271 

6. Two (2) courses from the following: ATY 213*, ECO 
201*, PSC 210*, SOC 202* 

Students may not count either ATY 213 or SOC 
202 in both the core and Group B. 



*BIO 105/105L and BIO 111 satisfy GLS. CHE 101, 103/110, and 
1111112 satisfy GPS. GEO 103 and 106/1061 satisfy GPS. STA 108 
satisfies GMT. ATY 213 satisfies GSB and GN. ECO 201 satisfies 
GSB. PSC 210 satisfies GSB. SOC 202 satisfies GSB and GL. 
B. Additional ENV and Related Area Courses (36 s.h.) 

Choose a minimum of 36 semester hours from the 
four groups below with at least six (6) hours from each 
of the Groups 1, 2, and 3 and at least three (3) hours from 
Group 4. Students may choose a maximum of 12 hours 
in any one department. At least 18 hours of the 36 hours 
must be at the 300 level or above. Students may count a 
maximum of two (2) internships toward the major. 

1. Natural Sciences (at least 6 s.h.) 

ATY 253/253L; BIO 271, 277, 301/302 (lab), 322, 
341, 354, 361, 420, 430, 431, 438, 477, 497; CHEM 
205/206 (lab), 252, 331/333, 351, 352, 490; ENV 399 
(science focus); GEO 205, 305, 31 1/31 1L, 314/314L, 
330, 495; HEA 314 

2. Applied Social Sciences (at least 6 s.h.) 

ATY 213, 330, 450, 465, 520, 526; GEO 105, 303, 
313, 357, 359, 495; HEA 207, 316; NTR 303; HTM 463, 
HTM/RPM/GEO 320; ENV 493 

3. Policy and Humanities (at least 6 s.h.) 

ECO 380; ENG 219, 318, 319, 323, 380, 401; ENV/ 
PSC 312, ENV/PSC 313, ENV/PSC 314; ENV 399, 401, 
493; HIS 311; IAR 221, 222; MST 326; PHI 363; HEA 
318, REL 250, SOC 202, 365, 370 

4. Research Methodology (at least 3 s.h.) 

ATY 476; ECO 250; ENG 323, 327; GEO 322; 
HEA 315, 325, 340; PSC 301; PSY 311; RPM 418; SOC 
301; STA 291 

Honors in Environmental Studies 

Honors courses may be offered as special sections of reg- 
ular courses, Honors Tutorials, or contract courses. 

Requirements 

Twelve semester hours of Honors work to include the fol- 
lowing: 

1. 9 s.h. of Honors work in required courses 

2. HSS 490 (Senior Thesis or Project) 

Qualifications 

1. A grade of at least B in all course work used to satisfy 
the Honors requirement in Environmental Studies 

2. Declared Environmental Studies Major 

3. Minimum overall 3.30 GPA at graduation 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in 
Environmental Studies" and the title of the Senior Honors 
Project will be printed on the student's official transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

See Honors Faculty liaison Susan Buck for further infor- 
mation and guidance about Honors in Environmental Stud- 



200 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Environmental Studies 



Environmental Studies as a Second Major 

Students who wish to earn a second major in Environ- 
mental Studies must complete all requirements for the Envi- 
ronmental Studies major. 

Environmental Studies Minor 
AOSCode: U825 

Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 
Required courses: 

1. ENV 100 

2. A minimum of 15 semester hours outside the 
student's major department, with no more than 8 
hours from any one department: 

a Natural Sciences (at least 6 s.h. from two 

departments) from ATY 253/253L; BIO 271, 277, 
301/302, 322, 341, 354, 361, 420, 430, 431, 438, 
477, 497; CHE 205/206, 252, 331/333, 351, 352, 
490; GEO 205, 305, 311/311L, 314/314L, 330, 
495; HEA 314 

b. Applied Social Sciences (at least 3 s.h.) from 
ATY 213, 330, 450, 465, 520, 526; ENV 493; GEO 
105, 303, 313, 357, 359, 495; HEA 207, 316; NTR 
303; HTM 463; HTM/RPM/GEO 320 

c. Policy and Humanities (at least 3 s.h.) from 
ECO 380; ENG 219, 318, 319, 323, 380, 401; 
ENV/PSC 312, 313, 314; ENV 401, 493; HEA 
318; HIS 311; IAR 221, 222; MST 326; PHI 363; 
REL 250; SOC 202, 365, 370 

Environmental Studies Courses (ENV) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

100 Introduction to Environmental Studies (3:3) 

Survey of current environmental issues from ecological, social, 
cultural, political, and economic perspectives. (Fall or Spring) 

312 Environmental Law and Policy (3:3) 

Study of federal and international environmental law and pol- 
icy: topics include air and water pollution, hazardous and toxic 
substances, climate change, atmospheric pollutions, and related 
issues. Buck (Same as PSC 312) 

313 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3:3) 

Study of state, federal, and international natural resources law 
and policy: topics include acquisition and management of public 
lands, wildlife, biodiversity, resource conservation. Buck (Same 
as PSC 313) 

314 Wildlife Law and Policy (3:3) 

Evolution of American wildlife law with focus on private prop- 
erty, federal-state relations, and federal protection of species, 
habitat, and biodiversity. Buck (Same as PSC 314) 

399 Environmental Studies Internship (3:1:10) 

Pr. written permission of instructor 
150 hours of supervised work in a private, nonprofit, or public 
environmental agency; five 2-hour seminars to discuss assigned 
readings and internship experiences; research paper or written 
field project required. (Fall & Spring) 



401 Individual Study (1-3) 

Pr. departmental permission 

• May be repeated for credit if topic of study changes. 

Reading or research. Available to qualified students upon recom- 
mendation of supervising instructor. (Fall & Spring) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. minimum 3.30 GPA in the major; 12 s.h. completed in the major; 
departmental permission 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 



Exercise and Sport Science 



(see Kinesiology) 



Finance 



(see Accounting and Finance) 



French 



(see Romance Languages) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



201 



Freshman Seminars 



Freshman Seminars Program 

The College of Arts & Sciences 

100 Foust Building 
336/334-3186 " 
www.uncg.edu/aas/fms.htm 

Freshman Seminars are small discussion classes that 
introduce students to various areas of study in the General 
Education Program. Each seminar focuses on a topic, issue, 
or problem selected by the instructor; seminar topics change 
from one semester to the next and are described in a booklet 
that is distributed to advisors at the beginning of each semes- 
ter. Additional information on Freshman Seminars may be 
obtained from the College of Arts and Sciences, 100 Foust 
Building (336/334-3186). 

Freshman Seminar Courses (FMS) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Freshman Seminars are open to freshmen ONLY. 

Except for FMS 115 (which is equivalent to ENG 101/ 
RCO 101, English Composition I) and FMS 116 (which is 
equivalent to ENG 102/RCO 102, English Composition II), all 
seminars are offered as writing-intensive courses. 

Students may not receive credit for more than one 

seminar under the same course number, even if 

the contents of the seminars are different. 

115 Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse I (3:3) 
GECore: GRD 

• Equivalent credit to ENG 101/RCO 101; students may not 
receive credit for both FMS 115 and either ENG 101/RCO 101. 

Instruction and practice in deliberative, informative, and reflec- 
tive writing based on the study of primary texts. Emphasis on the 
writing/revising process and on critical reading. 

116 Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse II (3:3) 

GECore: GRD 

Pr. ENG 101, FMS 115 (or FMS 103) or RCO 101 

• Equivalent credit to ENG 102/RCO 102; students may not 
receive credit for FMS 116 and either ENG 102/RCO 102. 

Writing, reasoning, and rhetoric about the works of Western cul- 
ture. 

120 Freshman Seminar in Literature (3:3) 
GE Core: GET 

A study of major selected works in literature. 

121 Freshman Seminar in Literature — Global Perspectives 
(3:3) 

GE Core: GET GE Marker: GE 

Global perspectives on major works in literature. 

122 Freshman Seminar in Literature — Global Non-Western 
Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GET GE Marker: GN 

Global Non-Western perspectives on major works in literature. 
130 Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts (3:3) 

GECore: GFA 
An introductory study of selected topics in the fine arts (which 
include painting, sculpture, cinema, dance, music, and theatre). 



131 Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts— Global Perspectives 
(3:3) 

GE Core: GFA GE Marker: GE 

Global perspectives on the study of selected topics in the fine arts 
(which include painting, sculpture, cinema, dance, music, and 
theatre). 

132 Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts — Global Non- Western 
Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GFA GE Marker: GN 

Global Non-Western perspectives on the study of selected topics 
in the fine arts (which include painting, sculpture, cinema, dance, 
music, and theatre). 

140 Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and 
Ethical Principles (3:3) 

GECore: GPR 
Studies of the philosophical, religious, and/or ethical traditions 
that have shaped societies in the past and present. 

141 Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and 
Ethical Principles — Global Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GPR GE Marker: GE 

Global perspectives on the studies of the philosophical, religious, 
and/or ethical traditions that have shaped societies in the past 
and present. 

142 Freshman Seminar in Philosophical, Religious, and 
Ethical Principles — Global Non- Western Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GPR GE Marker: GN 

Global Non-Western perspectives on the studies of the philosoph- 
ical, religious, and/or ethical traditions that have shaped societies 
in the past and present. 

150 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GPM 

Introduction to the historical study of culture from ancient times 
through the Reformation. 

151 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern — Global Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GE CAR: GPM 

Global perspectives on the historical study of culture from ancient 
times through the Reformation. 

152 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Premodern — Global Non-Western Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GPM 

Global Non-Western perspectives on the historical study of cul- 
ture from ancient times through the Reformation. 

160 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: Modern 
(3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

Introduction to the historical study of culture from the 17th cen- 
tury through modern times. 

161 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Modern — Global Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GE CAR: GMO 

Global perspectives on the historical study of culture from the 
17th century through modern times. 

162 Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives: 
Modern — Global Non-Western Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GMO 

Global Non-Western perspectives on the historical study of cul- 
ture from the 17th century through modern times. 



202 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Genetic Counseling; Geography 



170 Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies 
(3:3) 

GECore: GSB 
Introduction to the scientific study of individuals, societies, and 
human institutions with an emphasis on the methods and results 
of investigations in these areas. 

171 Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies — 
Global Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GSB GE Marker: GL 

Global perspectives on the scientific study of individuals, soci- 
eties, and human institutions with an emphasis on the methods 
and results of investigations in these areas. 

172 Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Studies- 
Global Non-Western Perspectives (3:3) 

GECore: GSB GE Marker: GN 

Global Non-Western perspectives on the scientific study of indi- 
viduals, societies, and human institutions with an emphasis on 
the methods and results of investigations in these areas. 

183 Freshman Seminar in Physical Science (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Introduction to the study of physical science in the natural world. 
Illustrates the nature of scientific inquiry and the formulation of 
hypotheses. 

183L Freshman Seminar in Physical Science Laboratory 
(1:0:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Laboratory work to accompany FMS 183. 

184 Freshman Seminar in Life Science (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GES 

Introduction to the study of life science in the natural world. 
Illustrates the nature of scientific inquiry and the formulation of 
hypotheses. 

184L Freshman Seminar in Life Science Laboratory (1:0:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GES 

Laboratory work to accompany FMS 184. 

195 Freshman Seminar in Mathematics (3:3) 

GECore: GMT 
Introduction to selected areas of study in the mathematical sci- 
ences. 



Genetic Counseling 

Master of Science Program 

The Graduate School 

Program office: 1 1 9 Mclver Street 

336/256-0175 

www.uncg.edu/gen 

Nancy Callanan, Director 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 

for graduate-level courses. 



Department of Geography 

College of Arts & Sciences 

129 Graham Building 

336/334-5388 
www.uncg.edu/geo 

Faculty 

Jeffrey Patton, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Bennett, Debbage, Knapp 

Associate Professors Bunch, Leivis, Liu, E. Nelson, Royall, Stine, 

Sultana, Walcott 
Assistant Professor Lennartson 
Lecturer/Spatial Analysis Lab Director, J. Nelson 
Lecturer/Physical Geography-Geology Lab Director, Hall-Broum 

Mission Statement 

The Department of Geography is a student-centered department 
having a three-fold integrated mission encompassing teaching, 
scholarship, and service. The Department offers a program present- 
ing an integrative perspective on the relations among social, political, 
economic, and physical phenomena occurring across space. Tlie De- 
partment is committed to teaching the concepts and research methods 
of the discipline in order to prepare geography majors for professional 
careers and/or advanced study. Non-geography majors are presented 
the geographic knowledge needed to understand the nature of the 
human and environmental patterns found in the world around them. 
Graduate student education is focused on preparing our students 
for advanced professional careers and/or further graduate study. The 
Department is committed to excellence in both theoretical and applied 
research. Undergraduate and graduate students involvement in 
research is encouraged to develop student understanding, reasoning, 
and technical skills. Through scholarship, teaching, and service, the 
Department of Geography is dedicated to bettering our community, 
nation, and planet. 

The Department of Geography offers a program which 
has three principal objectives: to promote the understanding 
of the locational dimensions of human behavior in their envi- 
ronmental context; to offer a curriculum where geographic 
concepts and methods are applied to understanding eco- 
nomic, environmental, and social problems at the urban and 
regional scale; and to promote international understanding 
through area studies. Thus, the purposes of the program are 
to contribute an important dimension to the university stu- 
dent's liberal education and to provide practical training in 
important contemporary areas of concern as well as the back- 
ground appropriate for certain vocations. 

Graduating majors of the department have found careers 
in business and industry, in urban and regional planning 
agencies, in departments of federal and state governments, 
and in teaching. Job titles include city or regional planner, car- 
tographer, demographer, resource analyst, land or economic 
developer, location analyst, and teacher. Many graduates find 
that an undergraduate degree in geography is an excellent 
foundation for advanced graduate work or professional train- 
ing in planning, business or law. 

Special facilities of the department include fully equipped 
laboratories in computer cartography, geographic informa- 
tion systems, remote sensing, and physical geography, plus a 
130-acre field camp for both instruction and research. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



203 



Geography 



Geography Major (GEOG) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOS Codes: 

Geography (general), U163 

Geographic Information Science, U164 

Urban Planning, U165 

Earth Science/Environmental Studies, U167 

Geography with Social Studies High School Teaching 
Licensure, U169 

The Geography Major requires four courses from a 
selection of fifteen and requires a minimum of 27 semester 
hours in geography above the 100 level. Students may elect 
a general geography major or they may complete additional 
courses for a concentration in Urban Planning, Earth Science/ 
Environmental Studies, or Geographic Information Science. 
Students may also complete a major in Geography with Social 
Studies High School Teaching Licensure. 

Student Learning Goals 

Students completing this major are expected to demon- 
strate a basic competence in earth science, human geography, 
and regional geography. In addition, they are expected to be 
able to successfully investigate geographic problems using 
the current research techniques and methodologies of the dis- 
cipline and to clearly and effectively express their findings in 
both written and oral form. 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Stude7its may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

Department specifies courses for: 

One additional GLT course (student may select) 3 

Required: GEO 103 or GEO 106/1 06L 6-7 

and one additional GNS course with a different 
departmental prefix (if GEO 103 is selected, 
the second GNS must be a lab course) 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 
courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 
while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 
required by the major/concentration. 



Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

A minimum of 27 semester hours in geography above 
the 100 level. Only grades of C- or higher will count toward 
completion of the major and concentrations. 

Core Courses for Geography Major and Concentrations 

1. One geographic techniques course from GEO 121, 322, 
357, 359 

2. One earth science course: GEO 103* or GEO 106/106L* 

3. One human geography course from GEO 105, 114, 301, 
302, 303, 306 

4. One regional geography course from GEO 102, 104, 313, 
344, 491 

*GEO 103 or GEO J06/106L satisfies one GNS requirement and 
GPS. 

Urban Planning Concentration 

The inter-regional shift of people and jobs in the United 
States and elsewhere over the past decades coupled with the 
movement away from large central cities has increased the 
need for formal urban and regional planning. Planners are 
needed in the private sector as well as in state and local gov- 
ernments to provide the appropriate kinds of economic and 
community development that will ensure a high quality of 
life in both developed and developing countries. In a growth 
region like the Southeast, geographers with a planning back- 
ground are in increasing demand. 



204 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Geography 



In addition to the core courses in geography listed above, 
students choosing this concentration are required to take: 

1. GEO 105, 301, 306 

2. Five courses from the following: GEO 302, 303, 304, 
320, 322, 344, 357, 502, 522, 533 

Earth Science/Environmental Studies Concentration 

A central theme of geography is human interaction with 
the earth's physical environment. This concentration permits 
students to apply the basic scientific principles of physical 
geography, cartography, and natural resource analysis to the 
problem of ensuring a high quality of life through mainte- 
nance of the natural processes that support human existence. 
This concentration also provides training to enhance the 
employment opportunities of students with a strong interest 
in environmental assessment and resource evaluation. 

In addition to the core courses in geography listed above, 
students choosing this concentration must take: 

1. GEO 311, 311L, 314, 314L 

2. Minimum of five courses selected from the follow- 
ing: GEO 205, 305, 312, 330, 357, 359, 510, 511, 557, 
559, 570 

Geographic Information Science Concentration 

Students with this concentration will develop skills in 
using maps, geospatial computer programs, and remotely 
sensed images to answer geographic questions relevant to 
land use planning, urban development, geomorphic or bio- 
geographic processes, or environmental impact assessment. A 
capstone course (GEO 423), which includes a faculty-directed 
major project is completed in the final semester. 

In addition to completing the core courses for geogra- 
phy majors listed above, students in this concentration are 
required to complete: 

1. GEO 121, 357, and 359 

2. A minimum of one of the following: GEO 523, 557, 
559 

3. GEO 421, after completion of 1 and 2. 

V Related Area Requirements for General 
Geography Major 

No specific additional courses beyond the core are 
required. Suggested courses in other departments and schools 
are recommended by the department, depending on the inter- 
est of the student. 

VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

Geography as a Second Major 
Required: minimum of 27 semester hours 

A student may obtain a second major in geography along 
with any other major. The student should take 27 semester 
hours, including four core courses listed above for the Geog- 
raphy Major. Students considering this option should consult 
a faculty member in the department. 



Geography as a Second Academic 

Concentration for Elementary Education 

Majors 

Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

1. Required core courses: 

a. One from GEO 121, 322, 357, or 359 (3 s.h.) 

b. One from GEO 103 or 106/106L (3 s.h.) 

c. One from GEO 105, 1 14, 301, 302, 303, or 306 (3 s.h.) 

d. One from GEO 102, 104, 313, or 344 (3 s.h.) 

2. Any two additional GEO courses at the 300 level or 
higher (6 s.h.) 

Geography Minor 

Required: minimum of 18 semester hours 

Any six courses (18 semester hours) constitute a minor, 
but the following suggested course sequences will be of inter- 
est to certain students pursuing specific majors and with cer- 
tain career objectives such as planning, environmental con- 
servation, or business: 

1. General Geography Minor— 1 physical, 1 human, 
1 regional, 1 techniques course, and any other two 
geography courses 

2. Minor emphasizing Urban Planning— any six (6) 
courses from: 105, 301, 302, 303, 304, 306, 344, 502, 
522, 533 

3. Minor emphasizing Environmental Studies— any 
six (6) courses from: 103 or 106/106L, 105, 121, 205, 
303, 305, 311, 312, 314, 330, 357, 359, 510, 511, 521, 
570 

4. Minor emphasizing Geographic Information Sci- 
ence and Techniques — for the student desiring to 
acquire geographic research, writing, and carto- 
graphic techniques, any six (6) courses from: 105, 
121, 322, 357, 359, 522, 533, 557, 559 

5. Geography Minor for majors in the School of Busi- 
ness and Economics — for the major who wishes to 
acquire knowledge of industrial location, interna- 
tional trade, demographic change and environmen- 
tal impact— any six (6) courses from: 102, 103 or 
106/106L, 104, 105, 121, 301, 302, 303, 306, 344, 491, 
522, 533 

Geography Major with Social Studies High 
School Teaching Licensure 

Students seeking teacher licensure should see Teacher 
Education Programs. Licensure in social studies is available 
for geography majors. Additional semester hours may be 
required for completion of the degree. 

Majors planning to teach geography/social studies in the 
secondary schools should plan their programs to include one 
of the following: GEO 102, 104, or 344 and one of the follow- 
ing courses: GEO 105, 114, or 306. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



205 



Geography 



Geography Courses (GEO) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

102 The Historical Geography of the Western World (3:3) 

A study of the geographical factors which combine to form the 
major cultural regions of North America, Europe, and Australia- 
New Zealand. 

103 Introduction to Earth Science (3:3) 

GE Core: GNS CAR: GPS 

• Students cannot receive credit for both GEO 103 and GEO 
106/106L. 

Survey of basic concepts and processes integrating the nature of 
the earth's three primary physical systems: the solid earth and 
continents; the ocean basins and the oceans; and the atmosphere's 
weather. 

104 World Regional Geography (3:3) 

GECore: GSB GE Marker: GL 

Geographical criteria that define the major cultural and functional 
world regions. Emphasis on regional methods of geographical 
study, with applications to current world events and situations. 

105 Cultural Geography (3:3) 

GE Core: GSB GE Marker: GN 

Introductory project-oriented course concerned with the geo- 
graphical characteristics of population, political systems, settle- 
ment patterns and livelihoods. 

106 Geosystems Science (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq: GEO 1061 

• Students cannot receive credit for both GEO 103 and GEO 
106/106L. 

The earth's atmosphere, hydrological, and tectonic systems. 
Includes applications to natural resources management and envi- 
ronmental planning. (Fall & Spring) 

106L Geosystems Science Laboratory (1:0:2) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq: GEO 106 

• Students cannot receive credit for both GEO 103 and GEO 
106/106L. 

Laboratory exercises to accompany GEO 106, which must be 
taken concurrently. Topics include atmospheric data analysis, 
topographic map interpretation, and hydrological measure- 
ments. (Fall & Spring) 

110 Introduction to Geography (3:3) 

Changing interaction of man and his environment and the resul- 
tant human and economic patterns in various parts of the world. 

111 Physical Geology (3:3) 

GE Core: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq. concurrent registration in GEO 111L 
Survey of tectonic and erosional processes, mountain building, 
rivers, glaciers, deserts, and coastal landform development. 

111L Physical Geology Laboratory (1:0:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq. concurrent registration in GEO 111 
Laboratory demonstrations and map interpretation exercises to 
accompany GEO 111, which must be taken concurrently. 



114 The Geography of World Affairs (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Contemporary problems and issues of and between nations of 
the world as they have evolved in their geographical settings. 

121 Introduction to Geographic Information Science (3:3) 

GE Core: GNS CAR: GPS 

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of geographical infor- 
mation science (geographic data acquisition, representation, 
analysis, and interpretation). Technologies reviewed include 
topographic mapping, global positioning systems, aerial photog- 
raphy, and satellite remote sensing. (Fall & Spring) 

205 Environmental Change: Its Nature and Impact (3:3) 

Environmental changes related to human use of land, water, 
soils, minerals, and natural amenities. Planning for sustained use 
or preservation of land-based natural resources. 

301 Urban Geography: Global Patterns (3:3) 

GE Core: GSB GE Marker: GL 

Urbanization processes and the development of mega-cities and 
urban hierarchies emphasizing the differences between cities 
from across the world. 

302 Urban Geography: Land Use (3:3) 

Internal structure of cities, including the role of transportation 
systems, socio-economic development, and the physical environ- 
ment. Emphasis on differences within cities. 

303 World Population Problems (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Major world population problems, trends, and significant policy 
and action alternatives for the future. Impact of various geo- 
graphical factors on problems and trends. 

304 Introduction to Transportation Analysis (3:3) 

Transportation systems as they affect human behavior and urban 
patterns, primarily within a North American context. 

305 Environmental Hazards Assessment (3:3) 

Pr. 103 or equivalent 
Nature and geographical distribution of short-lived environmen- 
tal hazards including earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, volcanic 
eruptions, and landslides. Factors contributing to increased haz- 
ard potential. Alternative human responses to short-lived haz- 
ards. 

306 World Economic Geography (3:3) 

GECore: GSB GE Marker: GL 

Characteristics and location of the world's resources, theory of 
industrial location, world patterns of industry. (Formerly GEO 
202) 

311 Weather and Climate (3:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Pr. 103 or equivalent 

Coreq. concurrent registration in 311L 
Introduction to the nature, origin, processes, and dynamics of 
the atmosphere. Consideration also of human modification of the 
atmosphere and of climatic change. 
311L Climatology Laboratory (1:0:3) 

GECore: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq. concurrent registration in 311 
Laboratory work to accompany 311. 

312 Geomorphology of North America (3:3) 

A survey of the various landscape regions of the North America. 
Emphasis on the relationships between the geologic, erosional, 
and climatic processes occurring in each region. 



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313 Natural Resource Regions of North America (3:1:6) 

Pr. 103 or 314 and permission of instructor 
Regional natural resource use and associated human interaction 
with the natural environment. Instruction takes place during an 
extended field trip across portions of North America. 

314 Physical Geography: Landscape Processes (3:3) 

GE Core: GNS CAR: GPS 

Pr. 103 or equivalent 

Coreq. concurrent registration in 314L 
Examination of the processes responsible for the development of 
the earth's varied terrain characteristics. Analysis of environmen- 
tal problems involving human impact on landscape and river 
systems. 
314L Physical Geography Laboratory (1:0:3) 

GE Core: GNS CAR: GPS 

Coreq. concurrent registration in 314 
Laboratory demonstrations and map interpretation exercises to 
accompany GEO 314, which must be taken concurrently. 

320 Tourism Planning and Development (3:3) 
Geographic distribution of tourist development. Emphasis on the 
spatial dimension of origin-destination flows, economic geogra- 
phy of the travel industry, socio-economic and environmental 
impacts. Emphasis on tourism planning issues. (Same as HTM 
320 and RPM 320) 

322 Research Methods in Geography (3:3) 

Use of the scientific method, data collection, spatial analysis, and 
technical writing. Development of fundamental research and 
quantitative skills in geography. 

330 Elements of Hydrology (3:3) 

Pr. 103 or 311 or 314, or permission of instructor 
Introduction to the origin, properties, occurrence, circulation of 
the waters of the earth, including the application of hydrologic 
techniques for the evaluation of regional water budgets and prob- 
lems relating to the conservation of water resources. 

333 Geography of Europe (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Examination of human and physical characteristics of the Euro- 
pean region. Topics include settlement patterns, landscape 
evolution, patterns and spatial variation of economic activity, 
urbanization, and political divisions. 

338 Regions of Latin America (3:3) 

Geographic distinctiveness of Latin American regions, with an 
emphasis upon the physical foundation, bases of past develop- 
ment, and recent transformation. Major consideration given to 
Mexico/Central America, Peru/Bolivia, and Brazil. 

340 Geography of East Asia (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Examines dynamic economic, sociocultural, and political changes 
in East Asia by using geographical criteria to study physical and 
human resources influencing rapid modernization within an 
ancient framework. (Spring) 

344 Geography of the United States and Canada (3:3) 

GECore: GSB 
Study of the human and physical characteristics of the United 
States and Canada, with emphasis on the former. 

357 Principles of Cartography (3:2:3) 

Pr. GEO 111 
The science of cartography with an emphasis on the use of maps 
as descriptive and analytical tools. Laboratory work introduces 
computer mapping, compilation, design, and symbolization. 
(Formerly GEO 321) 



358 Geographic Information Systems (3:2:3) 

Pr. GEO 121 or permission of instructor 
Provides basic concepts and methods for capturing, storing, 
querying, analyzing, and displaying geospatial data using Geo- 
graphic Information Systems (GIS). (Fall) 

359 Remote Sensing (3:2:3) 

Pr. 121 
Acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of digital and photo- 
graphic imagery. Emphasis on use of satellite and aircraft imagery 
for classification and monitoring of the earth's physical and cul- 
tural landscape. (Formerly GEO 323) 

421 Geographic Information Science (3:2:3) 

Pr. GEO 121, 357, 359 
Principles and use of geographic information; emphases are on 
data acquisition and techniques of spatial analysis and display. 
Requirements include a substantial applied research project. 
(Spring) (Formerly GEO 423) 

490 Special Problems in Geography (3) 

Pr. permission of faculty member with whom student wishes to work 
and at least 3 s.h. of previous work in geography 
Opportunity for advanced students to undertake independent 
study of field research of special interest. 

491 Current Topics in Regional Geography (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

Seminar dealing with major national and international topics in 
their current geographical context. (Occ) 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

495 Internship in Geography (3:0:9) 

Pr. written permission required before registering for the internship 
Practical experience in a professional setting related to the stu- 
dent's main topic of interest. Includes a research paper linking the 
topic to the experience. (Fall & Spring & Summer) 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

Freshmen and sophomores cannot register for 500-level 
courses without written permission from the instructor. 
502 Urban Planning (3:3) 

Experiences in planning and primary concepts and procedures 
utilized by planners in city and local government agencies for 
improving the quality of the urban environment. 

504 Political Geography (3:3) 

Pr. junior level or permission of instructor 
A systematic overview of relationships among space, place, and 
politics at multiple geographic scales. Topics include boundaries, 
geopolitics, nationalism, resource distribution, means of control- 
ling space, and the spatiality of globalization. 

510 Biogeography (3:3) 

Pr. GEO 311 or 314 or BIO 301 or admission to graduate program 
in geography or permission of instructor 
Study of the geographic distribution of organisms and the fac- 
tors/processes accountable. Emphasis on the increasingly impor- 
tant role humans play in influencing biogeographic processes. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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German and Russian 



511 Advanced Weather and Climate — Synoptic Climatology 
(3:3) 

Pr. GEO 311 or admission to graduate program in geography or 
permission of instructor 
Exploration of atmospheric dynamics and general circulation 
patterns throughout the world. Emphasis on cyclogensis, sur- 
face-upper atmosphere links, tropospheric waves, vorticity, and 
forecasting. 

522 Seminar in Population and Urban Studies (3:3) 

Advanced study of population processes and urban concepts 
from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. Emphasis on accessing and 
interpreting data from the U.S. census and other sources. 

533 Regional Economic Development (3:3) 

Theories of location of economic activity; techniques to assess 
impact of types of economic activity; policy and institutional 
issues related to local, state, and global economic development. 

557 Advanced Cartography (3:3) 

Pr. GEO 357 or permission of instructor 
Advanced instruction in cartographic production techniques and 
introduction to cartographic research. Students will learn to eval- 
uate academic literature and to implement research ideas using 
state-of-the-art technology. (Formerly GEO 521) 

559 Advanced Remote Sensing — Imaging (3:3) 

Pr. GEO 359 or permission of instructor 
Remote sensing of the environment using scientific visualization 
and digital image processing techniques. (Fall) (Formerly GEO 
520) 

560 Seminar in Regional Geography (3:3) 

• May be repeated once for credit when topic changes. 

Case studies of regionalism and the regional method in geogra- 
phy. (Occ) 

570 Applied Physical Geography (3:1:6) 

• May be repeated once when topic changes. 

Applications in physical geography. Topics include field experi- 
ence in hydrology, dendrochronology, geomorphology, climatol- 
ogy, and mapping. 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 
for additional graduate-level courses. 



Department of 
German and Russian 

including Chinese and Japanese Studies 

College of Arts & Sciences 

1129 Moore Humanities and Research Administration 

336/334-5427 

www.uncg.edu/gar/ 

Faculty 

Andreas Lixl, Professor and Head of Department 

Assistant Professors Ahem, Niebisch, Rinner 

Visiting Associate Professor Wu 

Lecturers Campitelli, Levesque, Liu, Takagi 

Adjunct Instructors Haeseler, Pynes 

The aim of the Department of German and Russian is 
to impart a deeper understanding for important foreign lan- 
guages and cultures in the context of a liberal and humanistic 
education. 

Our courses are intended to advance language proficiency 
skills and to contribute to the student's intellectual develop- 
ment and aesthetic experience. Language instruction courses 
provide students with speaking skills and knowledge that 
will enable them to inform themselves independently about 
the life and literature of German, Russian, Japanese, and Chi- 
nese speaking cultures. More advanced courses emphasize 
language, literature, and culture studies, which are the pri- 
mary goals of the majors in German and Russian. 

The language laboratory provides students with Web 
facilities for aural and oral exercises. Cultural material such 
as films, records, and tapes is coordinated with classroom 
work. Students may also elect to live in UNCG's International 
House. 

The UNCG film program provides German, Russian, 
and Japanese films each semester. German and Russian Stud- 
ies Roundtables provide open academic forums for interdisci- 
plinary discussions among both faculty and students. 

The Department maintains an active membership in the 
German Studies Consortium, which utilizes the NC Informa- 
tion Superhighway to share teaching and learning resources 
to enhance German Studies across The University of North 
Carolina system. This consortium offers a broad array of Ger- 
man Studies courses in the language, literature, and culture 
of the German-speaking countries taught by specialists in 
the field. The primary focus is on the sharing of upper-level 
courses for German majors and minors enrolled in the pro- 
gram. Participant universities include Appalachian State Uni- 
versity, East Carolina University, North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, The University of North Carolina at Asheville, The 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro, The University 
of North Carolina at Wilmington, and Western Carolina Uni- 
versity. 

From time to time UNCG Summer Study Abroad travel 
programs are offered. Information on other summer pro- 
grams abroad is available. 



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Students who wish to spend their junior year studying 
any subject at the Universities of Bamberg, Mannheim, Osn- 
abriick, The Higher School of Commerce at Worms (UNCG 
partner institutions), or with other programs, must have com- 
pleted intermediate language courses. Similar exchanges are 
available with Slavic and Japanese universities. 

In addition to pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree in 
German students can major or minor in Russian Studies 
or in Asian Studies. See International and Global Studies. 
A major in German can also be pursued in tandem with an 
International Business Studies major. 

An Accelerated Masters Program for undergraduates 
provides the opportunity to complete a B.A. in German and 
a Master of Business Administration. Students are strongly 
advised to familiarize themselves with this program at the 
end of this chapter. 

German Major (GERM) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOS Code: 

German, U171 

The German Major, depending on the student's inter- 
est and other abilities, may lead into various careers such as 
teaching, government service and international trade. The 
specialized study of German aims to improve language skills 
and to convey an understanding of German culture, through 
the study of literature, film, and works of German thought. 

Students seeking teacher licensure should see Teacher 
Education Programs. 

Student Learning Goals 

Upon completion of the program, German majors will be 
expected to: 

• Speak, read, write, and comprehend the German 
language proficiently 

• Interpret the history of German civilization in terms 
of major periods and movements and be able to 
explain critical methods for interpreting these peri- 
ods and movements 

• Explain the interrelationships of literature and 
culture to social history and intellectual life in 
German-speaking countries 

• Identify major genres of Germanic literatures and 
various critical approaches to interpreting literary 
texts 

• Research, organize, and present in both German 
and English effective oral presentations on German 
Studies topics 

• Research, organize, and develop in both German 
and English coherent critical writings on German 
Studies topics 

• Use computers effectively as research and writing 
tools, as well as conduits to library and Internet 
resources for information about German and cen- 
tral European cultures 



Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 6 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have a 
different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 
which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

All majors must maintain a GPA of at least 2.0 in German 
courses for a degree in German. 



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Minimum of 27 semester hours in German above the 204 
level, including at least: 

1. Four courses involving literature or culture from 
the following: GER 215*, 216*, 217*, 218*, 221*, 305*, 
306*, 403, 404, 405, 406, 491, 492 or 493 (if taken for 3 
s.h.) 

2. Five additional courses above the 204 level 

3. Majors may also take MST 527 (German Auteurs) 
plus 1 s.h. of tutorials (491, 492). 

*These courses count as major credit only if a student also enrolls 
in GER 291 and/or 1 semester hour of tutorials (491, 492) where 
an appropriate amount of speaking or reading or writing is done in 
German. 

V Suggested Related Area Courses 

Suggested but not required: ART 305; ATY 385, 387, 587; 
ENG 201, 202, 339, 340; HIS 375, 376, 392; RUS 201, 202, 313, 
314, 315, 316; PHI 252, 330 

VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

German as a Second Major 

Required: minimum of 27 semester hours above the 204 

level 

The requirements for a second major in German are the 
same as for the German major described above. 

German as a Second Academic Concentration 
for Elementary Education Majors 
Required: 18 semester hours 

1. Required core courses: 6 s.h. involving literature or 
culture from 305, 306, 405, 406 

2. Electives: 12 s.h. [four (4) additional language, litera- 
ture, or culture courses] above GER 204 level 

German Minor 

Required: minimum of 15 semester hours 

15 semester hours above GER 102, to include GER 203 
and 204 plus 9 additional hours, at least 6 of which must be 
at the 300 level or higher. NOTE: Courses in German litera- 
ture or culture in English translation (215, 216, 217, 218, 221) 
can only be used for minor credit if an appropriate amount of 
reading is done in German. 

Honors in German 
Requirements 

Six (6) semester hours to consist of: 

• 3 s.h. of HSS 490 Senior Honors Project 

• 3 s.h. of GER 493 (in preparation for Senior Honors 
Project) 

Must be completed in residence. 
Six (6) semester hours to consist of: 

• 3-6 s.h. of GER 493 (unrelated to Senior Honors 
Project) or 3-6 s.h. of contract courses in German 
above the 200 level 



Qualifications 

• A grade of at least B in all course work used to satisfy 
the Honors requirement in German 

• A declared major in German 

• At least a 3.30 overall GPA at graduation 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in 
German" and the title of the Senior Honors Project will be 
printed on the student's official transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

See Dr. Jeffrey Adams for further information and advis- 
ing about Honors in German. 

Accelerated Master's Program 
for German Majors 

Interested students should see Accelerated Master's 
Programs for Undergraduates for details about the B.A. in 
German/M.B.A. program requirements. 

Russian Minor 

Required: minimum of 15 semester hours 

AOSCode: U160 

15 semester hours above the 100 level of which the fol- 
lowing six are required: RUS 203, 204 

Note: RUS 203 and 204 count toward the Russian Stud- 
ies program (see International and Global Studies). 

German Courses (GER) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses Read in English 

German literature courses read in English translation are as 
follows: 

215, 216 German Civilization: Readings in English (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
217, 218 Masterworks of German Literature Read in English 
(3:3), (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GL 

221 Germanic Mythology: Readings in English (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

A full description of the above courses will be found in 
numerical order in the German courses listed below. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

101, 102 Elementary German (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Essentials of speaking, listening, reading, writing, vocabulary, 
and grammar. Supplementary work in the Multimedia Language 
Laboratory. 

101L Elementary German Laboratory (1:1) 

Coreq. concurrent registration in 101 
Optional supplementary multimedia lab course at the elementary 
level for students interested in improving their command of the 
language. Course meets one hour a week for the whole semester. 



210 



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101B, 102B Elementary Business German (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Essentials of grammar, graded reading, vocabulary building. 
Business language emphasis in laboratory work required. 

102L Elementary German Laboratory (1:1) 

Coreq. concurrent registration in 102 or permission of instructor 
Optional supplementary multimedia lab course at the elementary 
level for students interested in improving their command of the 
language. Course meets one hour a week for the whole semester. 

203 Intermediate German (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL CAR: GFL 

• Proficiency level: GER 102 or equivalent 

Continuation and further study of basic German structures with 
emphasis on spoken and written language skills. 

204 Intermediate German Topics (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL CAR: GFL 

• Proficiency level: GER 203 or equivalent 

Reading, composition and discussion, at an intermediate level, 
based on German texts on various topics. 

205 Experimental Course: German for Reading Knowledge 
(3:3) 

Reading German-language texts at an advanced intermediate 
level. (Offered fall '08) 

215, 216 German Civilization: Readings in English (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Cultural, political, and social development of Germany from its 
origin to the present. 215— Middle Ages (Romanesque, Gothic) 
through the fifteenth century. 216— from the Reformation to the 
present. Attention given to the German elements in America. Use 
of films, slides, and records. Taught in English. Majors required 
to do additional reading in German. 

217, 218 Masterworks of German Literature Read in English 
(3:3), (3:3) 

GE Core: GLT GE Marker: GL 

Reading and discussion in English translation of some of the best 
works of German literature. 217— the Middle Ages, Baroque and 
Classical Periods, Romanticism, Realism. 218— Selected major 
works of 20th-century prose fiction. Authors include Kafka, 
Hesse, T Mann, Handke, M. Walser, and Suskind. 

221 Germanic Mythology: Readings in English (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Course taught in translation. Myths of Northern Europe, their 
main personages and events as preserved in the heroic sagas and 
epics, the traces of these myths in later literature, in folklore and 
art, the history of their revival in the nineteenth century (Brothers 
Grimm, Richard Wagner), the variety of interpretations given to 
them. 

291 German Conversation Topics (1:0:1) 

GE Marker: GL 

• Proficiency level: GER 204 or equivalent 

• May be repeated for credit as topics vary for a maximum of three 
(3) semester hours. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Speaking intensive training during formal and informal conver- 
sations in German Kaffeestunde settings. Interdisciplinary topics 
focus on current affairs in the German-speaking countries. 



301 German Conversation and Composition: Topics (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
For students desiring some proficiency in spoken and written Ger- 
man. Conversation and composition based on various announced 
topics. Attendance at Kaffeestunde required unless excused by 
instructor. Course always taught as writing intensive. 

302 German Language and Society: Topics (3:3) 

For students desiring proficiency in written German, especially 
geared toward students who plan to study abroad or who plan to 
enter graduate school. Compositions based on various announced 
topics. Course always taught as writing intensive. 

305 German Literature: Advanced Intermediate Topics (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

• Proficiency level: GER 204 or equivalent 

Course aims at improving students' language proficiency and 
familiarity with German literature. Taught in English or Ger- 
man. 

306 German Culture: Advanced Intermediate Topics (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

• Proficiency level: GER 204 or equivalent 

Course aims at improving students' language proficiency and 
familiarity with German civilization. Taught in German or Eng- 
lish. 

306F German Culture: Advanced Intermediate— Topics in 
German Film (3:2:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

• Proficiency level: GER 204 or equivalent 

Course aims at improving students' language proficiency and 
familiarity with German films and filmmakers. Taught in Ger- 
man or English. 

307 Advanced German Grammar (3:3) 

• Proficiency level: GER 204 or equivalent 

Intensive study of grammar (including features not covered in 
lower levels of instruction) and of contrasting structures of Ger- 
man and English. Introduction to reference tools. 

308 Topics in Central European Studies to 1918 (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. none when taught in English; GER 204 when taught in German 

• May be repeated when topic varies. 

Interdisciplinary foci on cultural, literary, and historical trends. 
Taught in English or German. (Alt) 

309 Topics in Central European Studies since 1918 (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

Pr. none when taught in English; GER 204 when taught in German 

• May be repeated when topic varies. 

Interdisciplinary foci on modernist culture, literature, and media. 
Taught in English or German. (Alt) 

311 Business German (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL CAR: GFL 

• Proficiency level: GER 203 or equivalent 

Introduction to the special vocabulary and syntax as used in busi- 
ness contacts, correspondence and articles. Practice in reading 
and writing for business purposes and travel. 

403 German Literary Studies: An Introduction (3:3) 

• Proficiency level: GER 301 or equivalent 

Readings from various genres by representative authors from the 
Age of Goethe to Symbolism, Expressionism, and contemporary 
literature. Introduction to methodologies of literary analysis. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



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404 German Civilization: Research and/or Internet Projects 
(3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 

• Proficiency level: GER 204 or equivalent 

Research and Internet projects focusing on cultural, social, histor- 
ical, and interdisciplinary studies. Projects can be conducted in 
German and/or English. Course always taught as writing inten- 
sive. 

405 Advanced Topics in German Literature (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

• Proficiency level: GER 301 or equivalent 

Topics will be of a literary nature. Reading and discussion of texts 
with attention to interpretation and analysis. 

406 Advanced Topics in German Culture (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

• Proficiency level: GER 204 or equivalent 

Focus on culture and civilization. Studying texts and multimedia 
materials with attention to interpretation and analysis. 

407 Advanced Topics in German Language (3:3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

• Proficiency level: GER 301 or equivalent 

Linguistic or pedagogical topics include: history of the language; 
Indo-European to modern German. Reading Old High and Mid- 
dle High texts. Taught in German or English. 

491, 492 Tutorial (1-3), (1-3) 

Pr. permission of instructor 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

Directed program of reading, research, and individual instruc- 
tion in Germanic literatures and languages. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Russian Courses (RUS) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses in English Translation 

Russian Literature and Culture in English translation courses 

are as follows: 

201, 202 Russian Literature in Translation (3:3), (3:3) 

313 Major Authors in Russian Translation (3:3) 

314 Major Movements in Russian Literature and Culture (3:3) 

315 Twentieth-Century Russian Literature in Translation (3:3) 

316 Modern Polish Literature in Translation (3:3) 
511 The Russian Novel in Translation (3:3) 

A full description of these courses will be found in numerical 
order in the Russian courses listed below. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

101 Elementary Russian I (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Basic principles of grammar; graded reading of selected texts; 
some conversation; language laboratory facilities. 



101L Elementary Russian Lab (1:0:1) 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Optional supplementary multimedia lab course at the elementary 
level for students interested in improving their command of the 
language. Course meets one hour a week for the whole semester. 
102 Elementary Russian II (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Basic principles of grammar; graded reading of selected texts; 
some conversation; language laboratory facilities. 

102L Elementary Russian Lab (1:0:1) 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Optional supplementary multimedia lab course at the elementary 
level for students interested in improving their command of the 
language. Course meets one hour a week for the whole semester. 

201, 202 Russian Literature in Translation (3:3), (3:3) 

GECore: GLT (for RUS 201) GE Marker: GN 

Survey of Russian prose beginning with early Russian Literature 
and focusing on nineteenth-century Russian prose up to 1917. 
Works from the following writers are read: Pushkin, Gogol, 
Lermontov, Goncharov, Turgenev, Leskov, Garshin, Kuprin, 
Chekhov, Bunin, Belyj, Sologub. No knowledge of Russian 
required. 

203, 204 Intermediate Russian (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN CAR: GFL 

Review of grammar, practice in conversation, selected readings 
from nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature. 

301 Conversation, Composition, and Grammar Topics (3:3) 

• Proficiency level: RUS 204 or equivalent 

Reading and discussion of unedited Russian texts. Formal and 
informal writing. Study of grammar and idiom. 

306 Slavic Life and Letters: Topics (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

• Proficiency level: RUS 204 or equivalent 

Introduction to Slavic civilization. Emphasis on selected periods, 
themes or genres such as films, memoirs, folklore, mythology, 
women's lives, etc. Taught in English or Russian. 

313 Major Authors in Russian Literature (3:3) 

GECore: GUT GE Marker: GN 

• Proficiency level: RUS 204 or equivalent 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

Selected Russian authors read and discussed with attention to 
literary interpretation and analysis. Selection of authors and peri- 
ods vary. Taught in English or Russian. 

314 Major Movements in Russian Literature and Culture 
(3:3) 

GE Core: GLT GE Marker: GN 

• Proficiency level: RUS 204 or equivalent 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

Topics vary, each taking a broad perspective on an important 
movement, social trend, literary development, or cultural period. 
Taught in English or Russian. 

315 Twentieth-Century Russian Literature in Translation 

(3:3) 

Intensive study of the artistic writing in Russia from 1917 to the 
present. Readings cover poetry and prose of Sholokhov, Ilf and 
Petrov, Pasternak, Evtushenko, Solzhenitsyn, and others. 

316 Modern Polish Literature in Translation (3:3) 

Intensive study of the artistic writing in Poland from 1918 to pres- 
ent. Readings cover poetry and prose of Zeromski, Wittlin, Gom- 
browicz, Witkiewicz, Schulz, Iwaszkiewicz, Rozewicz, Tuwim, 
Andrzejewski, Milosz, and Herbert. 



212 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



German and Russian 



491, 492 Tutorial (1-3), (1-3) 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

Directed program of reading, research, and individual instruc- 
tion in Russian and Polish language and literature. 

493 Honors Work (3-6) 

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the 
major 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate 
Students 

511 The Russian Novel in Translation (3:3) 
Survey of the Russian novel from the nineteenth (Pushkin, Gogol, 
Turgenev, Goncharov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy), to the twentieth cen- 
tury (Belyj, Sologub, Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn). Analysis of 
artistic structure and ideas within the context of Russian literary 
history, philosophy, and religious thought. 

Please refer to International and Global Studies in this Bulletin for 
more information on the Russian Studies major or minor. 

Japanese Courses (JNS) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses For Undergraduates 

101, 102 Elementary Japanese (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Introduction to communicative Japanese and its writing systems: 
Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji. Students study fundamental words, 
phrases and expressions, and are introduced to basic grammar. 

203, 204 Intermediate Japanese (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN CAR: GPL 

• Proficiency level: JNS 101, 102 

Focus on four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writ- 
ing), and vocabulary building. Acquisition of Kanji characters. 
Verb conjugations and tenses. Simple texts from Japanese litera- 
ture. 

220 Modern Japan (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

• Taught in English. 

Introduction to Japanese culture and society. Emphasis on 
selected periods, themes or topics such as modern media, folk- 
lore, mythology, memoirs, women's lives, cultural movements. 

230 Women in Japanese Literature and Film (3:3) 

Course aims to improve student familiarity with Japanese civili- 
zation, literature, culture, and society, including gender, film, and 
minority perspectives. Taught in English. 

301 Advanced Grammar and Conversation (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

Pr. JNS 204 or equivalent 
Third-year Japanese language course to improve linguistic profi- 
ciencies, including the Kanji writing system. Taught in Japanese. 
(Alt) 

305 Topics in Japanese Culture (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

• May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 

• Proficiency level, when taught in Japanese: JNS 204 

Focus on Japanese civilization to improve linguistic and/or cul- 
tural proficiency. Taught in either English or Japanese. 



Chinese Courses (CHI) 



GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses For Undergraduates 

101 Elementary Chinese I (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Introduction to communicative Chinese. Essentials of speaking, 
listening, writing, reading, and basic grammar. (Fall) 

102 Elementary Chinese II (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Second course in the introductory sequence to Chinese language 
studies. Essentials of speaking, listening, writing, reading, and 
basic grammar. (Spring) 

203 Intermediate Chinese I (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN CAR: GFL 

Third course in a sequence leading to intermediate-level Chinese 
language proficiency. Conversational listening, speaking, writ- 
ing, reading, and grammar structures. (Fall) 

204 Intermediate Chinese II (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN CAR: GFL 

Fourth course in a four-course sequence leading to intermediate- 
level Chinese language proficiency. Conversational listening, 
speaking, writing, reading, and grammar structures. (Spring) 

210 Masterworks of Chinese Literature in Translation (3:3) 

GECore: GLT GE Marker: GN 

Readings and discussion of the best works of Chinese literature 
in English translation from the traditional to the modern periods. 
Taught in English. (Alt) 

220 Modern China (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Introductory Chinese culture course with interdisciplinary per- 
spectives on modern Chinese society, history, literature, and art. 
Taught in English. (Alt) 

301 Third-Year Chinese Language (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

Pr. CHI 204 or equivalent 
Third-year Chinese language course to improve oral and written 
proficiencies, including the Mandarin writing system. Taught in 
Chinese. (Alt) 

302 Third-Year Chinese Conversation and Composition 
(3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 

Pr. CHI 204 or equivalent 
Third-year Chinese language course focusing on topics of current 
interest. Taught in Mandarin Chinese. 

Please refer to International and Global Studies in this Bulletin for 
more information on the Asian Studies minor. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



213 



Gerontology; Grogan College 



Gerontology 



Grogan College 



Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program 

The Graduate School 

124 Mclver Building 

336/256-1020 
www.uncg.edu/gro 

Interdisciplinary Faculty and Advisors 

Beth E. Burba, School of Nursing 

Linda Buettner, Department of Recreation, Tourism, and 

Hospitality Management 
Anne R. Daniel, Department of Public Health Education 
Michele Haber, Department of Public Health Education 
Virginia A. Hinton, Department of Communication Sciences and 

Disorders 
A. Frank Johns, Gerontology Program 
Laurie M. Kennedy-Malone, School of Nursing 
Kenneth A. Klase, Department of Business Administration 
Kurt W. Kornatz, Kinesiology 
Sandra Leak, Department of Public Health Education 
Jane E. Myers, Department of Counseling and Educational 

Development 
Olav Rueppell, Department of Biology 
Sudha Shreeniwas, Department of Human Development and 

Family Studies 
Martha Taylor, Department of Nutrition 
William L. Tullar, Department of Business Administration 
Janice I. Wassel, Department of Sociology and Gerontology 

Program Director 
Bei Wu, Gerontology Program 

A Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in gerontology is offered 
through The Graduate School. Fifteen semester hours are 
required. Undergraduate students at UNCG who plan to 
undertake graduate study at UNCG, and who need no more 
than 12 hours of work to fulfill all requirements for the bach- 
elor's degree, may enroll in The Graduate School. See "Dual 
Registration" in The Graduate School Bidletin. 

Gerontology Course (GRO) 

Course for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate Students 
501 Seminar: Critical Issues of Aging (3:3) 

Intensive review and analysis of the literature and research on 
issues and unresolved problems of aging. (Fall) 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin 
for additional graduate-level courses. 



Greek 



(see Classical Studies) 



Office: 113 Grogan Hall 

336/334-5898 

www.uncg.edu/grc 

John Sopper, Director, Department of Religious Studies 

Love Crossling, Coordinator of Residential Learning 

Faculty Fellows 

Joi Bulls, Department of Human Development and Family Studies 

Stephanie Kurtts, School of Education 

Larry Lavender, Department of Dance 

Matthew Libera, School of Music 

Jonathan Salter, School of Music 

Deborah Stanford, School of Nursing 

Ramesh Upadhyaya, School of Nursing 

Joseph R. Erba, Bryan School of Business and Economics 

Misti Williams, School of Education 

Frank Woods, African American Studies Program 

lone Grogan College is one of three residential colleges at 
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Grogan Col- 
lege and Grogan Residence Hall are named after lone Grogan, 
an alumna of UNCG who returned to the University to teach 
mathematics and serve as a dormitory counselor. Grogan Col- 
lege, which was established in 1997, is limited to freshmen; it 
serves 200 students each year. 

Grogan College is designed to enhance students' aca- 
demic success and satisfaction with their college experience 
by providing a supportive community of students and fac- 
ulty with common interests. Grogan College is divided into 
approximately fifteen Learning Communities (LCs), each 
focused on a specific theme and headed by a Faculty Fellow. 
Some of the LCs are designed for students who have already 
selected a major; others are for students from any major who 
share an interest in the topic. The approximately 22 students 
in each LC take several courses together in the fall and spring 
semesters of their freshmen year. The Faculty Fellow teaches 
one of the courses, serves as a mentor to students, and meets 
with them for extracurricular activities. The Director works 
with all Faculty Fellows and students to provide program- 
wide activities and opportunities for leadership and service. 

Grogan College is a University-wide program. Faculty 
Fellows represent the College of Arts and Sciences and all 
six professional Schools. The Division of Student Affairs is a 
joint sponsor of the program, and Residence Life staff make 
an important contribution to the residence hall community. 
Enrollment Services provides scheduling and course registra- 
tion support. 

Grogan Residence Hall is an eight-story high-rise with 
air-conditioning and a co-ed residency. Internet and e-mail 
access is available in each room by a personal modem. A com- 
puter room, classroom/study area is located on the first floor, 
and study rooms are available on each floor. A kitchen and 
dining area on the ground floor opens to a covered patio and 
offers space for parties and picnics to Grogan College stu- 
dents. 



214 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



Health & Human Performance; History 



■m 



»" : ". 



Health 



(see Public Health Education) 



School of 
Health and Human Performance 

401 Health and Human Performance Building 

336/334-5744 

www. uncg.edu/hhp 

Health and Human Performance Courses (HHP) 

Courses for Undergraduates 

110 Bridging Differences through Community 
Relationships: Health and Human Performance (1:1) 

• Open to all undergraduates. 

• Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP) 

Expanding experience of race, gender, ethnicity, social class, and/ 
or other identities through developing relationships in commu- 
nity settings related to health and human performance. 

125 Personal and Academic Success in HHP (1:1) 

Develop essential knowledge and skills to enhance personal and 
academic success, with emphasis on self-awareness, self-manage- 
ment, interdependence, and self-responsibility. (Fall & Spring) 

589 Experimental Course: Web Sites for Health and 
Wellness Disciplines (1:1) 

Grade: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) 
Students design and create a Web site that is accessible and usable 
by a wide population, including those with differences. Focuses 
on Web issues particularly important to health professionals. 
(Offered spring '09) 



Department of History 

including Western Civilization 

The College of Arts & Sciences 

2129 Moore Humanities and Research Administration 

336/334-5992 

www.uncg.edu/his 

Faculty 

Charles Bolton, Professor and Head of Department 

Professors Bilinkoff, Calhoon, Caneva, Kriger, Logan, Mazgaj, 

Melton, Schleunes, Schweninger 
Associate Professors Anderson, Barton, Filene, Floyd, Hunter, 

Jackson, Jones, Ruzicka, Tolbert 
Assistant Professors Jennison, Levenstein, Michaelson, Rupert 
Lecturers deBeck, Moser 
Adjunct Professor Leimenstoll 

The Department of History offers a program which has 
four principal objectives: 1) to provide a general knowledge of 
the history of the United States, Europe, and the wider world 
(as we have defined our fields of concentration); 2) to teach 
students to think and read critically and thereby to develop 
the ability to analyze historical documents and to appreciate 
the nature of historical interpretations; 3) to improve students' 
ability to communicate both orally and in writing; and, 4) to 
foster the ability to conduct historical research. The Depart- 
ment offers a broad spectrum of courses in U.S., European, 
and wider world history; in the ancient, medieval, and mod- 
ern periods; in social, cultural, political, economic, intellec- 
tual, military, and diplomatic history; the history of science; 
and in a variety of special topics including gender, sexuality, 
witchcraft, and terrorism. 

The History Major prepares students for career oppor- 
tunities in a wide range of employment, where liberally 
educated minds can be turned to fruitful account. It offers 
an excellent general background for later, more specialized 
studies in fields such as law and journalism. A number of his- 
tory majors go on to work in public service at the local, state, 
and federal levels or find employment in those areas of the 
private sector where a premium is put on a sound general 
education. Finally, many history majors employ their skills 
more directly: in the teaching profession (from the primary 
through graduate school levels), in museums and archives, or 
in the expanding field of historical preservation work. 

The department offers programs leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts degree in history, the Master of Arts in history, and the 
Doctor of Philosophy in history. 

Although the department does not formally restrict 
admission to its courses with regard to level, it recommends 
its 300-level courses to sophomores and above and its 400- 
and 500-level courses to juniors and seniors. 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



215 



History 



History Major (HIST) 
Degree: Bachelor of Arts 

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 
hours at or above the 300 course level 

AOS Codes: 

History (general), U175 

History with Social Studies High School Teaching 
Licensure, U177 

Requirements 

I General Education Core Requirements (GEC) 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for complete 
GEC requirements and approved courses for all categories. 
Core Category S.H. 

Students may select courses for: 

Literature (GLT) 3 

Fine Arts (GFA) 3 

Philosophical, Religious, Ethical Principles (GPR) 3 

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (GHP) 3 

Mathematics (GMT) 3 

Natural Sciences (GNS) 6-7 

one must be a laboratory course; each must have 
a different departmental prefix 
Reasoning and Discourse (GRD) 6 

ENG 101 or FMS 115 or RCO 101, and one 
additional GRD course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 6 

II General Education Marker Requirements 

See chapter 5, University Requirements, for details and 

courses. It is possible to meet all GE Marker Requirements 

while completing the GE Core requirements or courses 

required by the major/concentration. 

Students may select courses for: 

Global/Global Non-Western Perspectives (GL/GN) 

four (4) courses carrying GL/GN markers, at least one of 

which must carry the GN marker 

One Speaking Intensive (SI) Course 

In addition to this SI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second SI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Speaking Intensive. 

One Writing Intensive (WI) Course 

In addition to this WI Marker requirement, students must 
also complete a second WI course within the major. All 
programs have identified at least one course among their 
major requirements that is taught as Writing Intensive. 

III College of Arts and Sciences Additional 
Requirements (CAR) 

See chapter 6 for requirements and approved courses. 
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 3 

either a GHP/GPM or GMO course 
Humanities and Fine Arts 3 

one additional Literature (GLT) course 



Natural Sciences 3-4 

one additional GNS/GLS or GPS course 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GSB) 3 

one additional GSB course 
Foreign Language (GFL) 0-12 

intermediate-level proficiency in one language, 

demonstrated by placement test, or completion 
of course work through course number 204 
Writing Intensive Courses (WI) 

a total of four WI courses 

IV Major Requirements 

Minimum 30 semester hours above the 100 level, where 
History is the primary major. 

All majors must maintain a cumulative grade point aver- 
age of at least 2.0 in history courses to qualify for a degree in 
History. 

The department divides its undergraduate offerings 
into three fields (see courses listed below): Western Europe, 
United States, and the Wider World. For the primary major, 
the minimum of 30 hours must include: 

1. 9 s.h. at the 200 level distributed as follows: 3 s.h. 
in Western Europe; 3 s.h. in United States; 3 s.h. in 
Wider World 

2. 12 s.h. at the 300 level, which must include one 
Research Intensive course, designated in the course 
schedule as RI 

3. 9 s.h. at the advanced (400 and 500) level, which 
must include HIS 511 A, B, or C (Seminar in Histori- 
cal Research and Writing); one 300-level RI desig- 
nated course will serve as a prerequisite for HIS 
511 A, B, C. 

To ensure that each major has breadth in his or her pro- 
gram, of the 30 semester-hour minimum, a student must take 
at least 6 hours from each of the three fields (Western Europe, 
United States, Wider World). In addition, at least 3 s.h. of the 
6 s.h. from each of the three fields must be at the intermediate 
(300) or advanced (400 and 500) level. 

Field I: Europe 

206, 208, 220, 221, 222, 223, 251, 252, 309, 310, 311, 315, 
348, 349, 351, 353, 354, 355, 360, 363, 364, 365, 368, 369, 371, 
373, 374, 375, 376, 392, 393, 395, 397, 492, 510, 511B or HSS 490, 
541, 542, 544, 560, 562, 563, 564, 567, 571, 574 

Field II: United States 

211, 212, 301, 302, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 334, 335, 
336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 343, 344, 345, 347, 359, 394, 491, 502, 
511 A or HSS 490, 512, 515, 517, 518, 520, 522, 524, 526, 530, 545, 
546, 549, 551, 559 

Field HI: Wider World 

203, 204, 207, 209, 215, 216, 217, 218, 239, 240, 303, 304, 
306, 320, 321, 333, 370, 377, 378, 381, 383, 384, 385, 386, 389, 
396, 399, 493, 508, 511C or HSS 490, 575, 581, 587, 588 

Other 

Individual study courses for the most part; will vary 
according to subject taught each time: 305, 390, 401, 402, 493. 



216 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



History 



V Related Area Requirements 

Because history is closely related to many other disci- 
plines, we strongly recommend that history majors consult 
their advisors about using their liberal education require- 
ments and electives to build a coherent series of related 
courses. Students interested in the various national histories 
may wish to pursue language and literature courses in the 
same area; students interested in social and institutional his- 
tory may wish to pursue courses in the social sciences such 
as anthropology, sociology, political science, and economics; 
students interested in cultural and intellectual history will 
profit by work in philosophy, religious studies, and art and 
music history. 

VI Electives 

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours 
required for degree. 

Honors in History 
Requirements 

Twelve semester hours to consist of: 

• Three (3) s.h. of HIS 394, 395, or 396 Honors Semi- 
nar in History 

• Three (3) s.h. of a contract honors course in History 
at the 300 level or above 

• Three (3) s.h. of HIS 491, 492, or 493 Honors Work, 
to be taken before HSS 490 

• Three (3) s.h. of HSS 490 Senior Honors Project (in 
lieu of HIS 511 A, B, C) 

Qualifications 

• A grade of at least B in all course work used to satisfy 
the Honors in History requirement 

• A declared History major 

• A minimum overall 3.30 GPA at graduation 

• Admission to the Lloyd International Honors College 

Recognition 

The designation "Completed Disciplinary Honors in His- 
tory" and the title of the Senior Honors Project will be printed 
on the student's official transcript. 

Honors Advisor 

See Prof. Paul Mazgaj for further information and guid- 
ance about Honors in History. For further information, see the 
Honors Programs section of this chapter. 

History Major with Social Studies High School 
Teaching Licensure 

Students seeking teacher licensure should see Teacher 
Education. Licensure in social studies is available for history 
majors. Additional semester hours are required for comple- 
tion of the degree. Please see teacher licensure requirements 
in Teacher Education Programs. 

History as a Second Major 

Students who wish to declare a second major in History 
must complete all requirements listed above for the History 
major. 



History as a Second Academic Concentration 
for Elementary Education Majors 

Required: 18 semester hours 

1. Required core courses (6 s.h.): HIS 211 and 212 

2. Select 12 s.h. from HIS 301, 302, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 
335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 343, 344, 347, 349 

History as a Second Academic Concentration 
for Special Education Majors 
Required: 18 semester hours 

1. Required core course (3 s.h.): HIS 211 or 212 

2. Required core course (3 s.h.): HIS 347 

3. Twelve (12) additional s.h. of HIS courses, of which two 
(2) are at the 200 level and two (2) are at the 300 level 

History Minor 

Required: 15 semester hours in history 

The History Minor complements majors in a variety of 
fields, including English, the languages, and the other social 
sciences. Requirements are flexible to permit students to select 
courses with the help of their major departments, which will 
develop and extend their individual interests as expressed in 
their majors. A student who has taken six (6) hours of West- 
ern Civilization may count three (3) hours toward the History 
minor. 

History Courses (HIS) 

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit; GE Marker denotes 
General Education Marker credit; CAR denotes College Additional 
Requirement credit. 

Courses for Undergraduates 

203 History of Africa to 1870 (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GPM 

Early African empires, the spread of Islam, European explora- 
tion, the Atlantic slave trade and its effects, slavery in Africa, 
white settlement in South Africa. 

204 History of Africa since 1870 (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GMO 

Colonial partition, missionaries, wars of resistance, styles of colo- 
nial rule, development and underdevelopment, independence 
movements and de-colonization, neo-colonialism, capitalism and 
socialism, civil wars, apartheid in South Africa. 

206 Topics in Premodern World History I (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GPM 

• May be repeated for credit when topic of study changes. 
Cross-cultural themes in premodern continental European his- 
tory explored in a world context, such as: History of Christian- 
ity; Atlantic Exploration and the Columbian Exchange; Everyday 
Life before 1750. (Fall or Spring) 

207 Topics in Premodern World History II (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GPM 

• May be repeated for credit when topic of study changes. 
Cross-cultural themes in premodern African, Asian, or Latin 
American/Caribbean history explored in a world context, such 
as: Merchants, Trade, and Cultural Encounters; Islam in Asia and 
Africa; Ancient American Empires. (Fall or Spring) 



2009-10 UNCG Undergraduate Bulletin 



217 



History 



208 Topics in Modern World History I (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GMO 

• May be repeated for credit when topic of study changes. 
Transnational themes in modern continental European history 
explored in a world context, such as: Emigration and Immigra- 
tion; Nation States and National Identities; History of "Develop- 
ment"; European Expansion and Colonial Empires. 

209 Topics in Modern World History II (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GMO 

• May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes. 
Transnational themes in modern African, Asian, or Latin Ameri- 
can/Caribbean history explored in a world context, such as: 
Borderlands, Frontier, and Cultural Change; Contradictions of 
Colonial Experience; Gender, Labor, and Modernization. (Fall 
or Spring) 

211, 212 The United States: A General Survey (3:3), (3:3) 

GE Core: GHP CAR: GMO 

First semester: to 1865. Second semester: since 1865. 

215 The Civilizations of Asia (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GPM 

History, institutions, and culture of India, China, and Japan, from 
earliest times to about 1700. Limited reference to Southeast Asia, 
Central Asia, and Korea. 

216 The Civilizations of Asia (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GMO 

Impact of West on Asia and Asia's response; development of 
nationalism and Communism. Focus is on India, China, and 
Japan in nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

217, 218 The World in the Twentieth Century (3:3), (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GMO 

Political, social, and economic forces affecting Africa, the Ameri- 
cas, Asia, and Europe. Issues include Cold War, imperialism, 
nationalism, terrorism, world war. First semester: 1900-1945. 
Second semester: since 1945. 

220 The Ancient World (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GPM 

Early civilizations: Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman to 
Reign of Constantine. 

221 Medieval Legacy (3:3) 

GE Core: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GPM 

Survey of Western European history from the end of the Roman 
Empire to the fifteenth century exploring such varied aspects of 
the medieval experience as pilgrimage, crusade, peasant life, the 
emergence of national states, and the rise of the university. 

222 Europe 1400-1789 (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GPM 

Survey of major socio-economic, political, and cultural trends in 
Europe from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. 

223 Modern Europe (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GMO 

Survey of major socio-economic, political, and cultural trends in 
Europe from the French Revolution to the present. 

239 Latin America: Colonial Period (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GMO 

Introduction to the early history of Latin America. Emphasis on 
the clash of cultures, Indian-Spanish relations, and the structure 
and mechanisms of empire. 



240 Latin America: National Period (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GMO 

Introduction to the political and economic history of Latin Amer- 
ica since independence. Survey covers political dynamics, social 
transformations, and the evolution of export economics. 

251, 252 The History of Western Science: A Survey (3:3), (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: 251-GPM; 252-GMO 

Introduction to major developments in the history of Western sci- 
ence. First semester: from antiquity to the Scientific Revolution. 
Second semester: from 18th to 20th century. 

301 Race and Slavery (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

Examination of the black experience from ancient to modern 
times, including pre-colonial Africa, the Atlantic slave trade, slav- 
ery in the Americas with special emphasis on the United States 
before 1865. 

302 Race and Segregation (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

Race and segregation in the United States since the Civil War, 
including the origins of Jim Crow laws, civil rights movement, 
black urbanization, the Harlem Renaissance, black nationalism, 
and the black experience in America. 

303 South Africa and Its Neighbors (3:3) 

Early African societies and states, slave trade and slavery, Euro- 
pean settlement and expansion, mineral revolution, colonialism 
and independence in Zimbabwe, Angola, Mozambique, Namibia; 
apartheid and African nationalism in South Africa. 

304 Gender, Family, and Wealth in African History (3:3) 

Examines how relations, obligations, and transactions between 
men and women have affected the production and distribution 
of wealth in African societies during precolonial times, colonial 
rule, and since independence. 

306 Islam and Popular Culture in Africa (3:3) 

• Not open to freshmen. 
Examines opportunities, challenges, and threats presented by 
Islam, and varying ways individual Africans and their communi- 
ties have responded to it since the 7th century. 

309 Unity and Unrest in Medieval Towns (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Examines the ways in which the towns of Medieval Europe con- 
structed social unity and the ways in which that unity was threat- 
ened by cultural change and social unrest. (Occ) 

310 Daughters of Eve: Women in the Middle Ages (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Examines the political, social, religious, and cultural experiences 
of women during the European Middle Ages. Consideration 
given to gender roles, family structure, and writings by and 
about women. (Alt Years) 

311 Darwin and the Theory of Evolution (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

Study of the background, genesis, and reception of Darwin's the- 
ory in its scientific and social context as the basis for an examina- 
tion of the nature and scope of scientific explanations. 

312 The Crusades (3:3) 

Social, political, and religious causes of crusading: events of the 
crusades (1097-1250); impact of the crusades on Christian Europe 
and the Muslim Near East. (Alt) 



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315 Witchcraft and Magic in European History (3:3) 

Examination of witchcraft beliefs and persecution as a way of 
studying the social history of Europe before industrialization. 
Emphasizes the "Witch Craze" of the sixteenth and seventeenth 
centuries. 

320 Central American History (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
The political structure and economies of a "nation divided," the 
Central American republics from independence in 1821 to the tri- 
umph of neoliberalism at the beginning of the 21st century. 

321 Latin America and the United States (3:3) 

A history of inter-American relations from the Monroe Doctrine 
to the Caribbean Basin Initiative. An examination of traditional 
interpretations and contemporary arguments and the Latin 
American context and perspective. 

324 The Frontier in American Culture (3:3) 

Role of the frontier as symbol and region in the development of 
American culture from early settlement to the twentieth century. 
Topics include race, gender, ethnicity, and popular culture. (Fall 
or Spring) 

325 History of the American Home (3:3) 

Study of houses as historical evidence of social change from the 
colonial period to the twentieth century. Topics include: impact 
of gender, region, social class, and ethnicity on American hous- 
ing. (Fall or Spring or Summer) 

326 Using Photographs as Historical Evidence (3:3) 

Case study approach using photographs as historical evidence 
from the Civil War to the Great Depression. History and interpre- 
tation of specific print materials. Identification, care and handling 
of historic photographs. (Fall or Spring) 

327 American Cultural History (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

• Not open to freshmen. 
Using paintings, houses, literature, radio, television, and other 
materials, this course explores the creation and development of 
American culture from early settlement through the twentieth 
century. 

328 U.S. Women's History to 1865 (3:3) 

A history of women in the U.S. to the Civil War. Topics include 
Native American gender systems, midwives, witchcraft, women's 
labor and education, families, slavery, and social reform. 

329 U.S. Women's History Since 1865 (3:3) 

A history of women in the U.S. since the Civil War. Topics include 
women's activism, labor, reproduction, public policy, race and 
class inequalities, and contemporary women's issues. 

332 Civil Rights and Black Freedom, 1940-1980 (3:3) 

Southern and national civil rights politics in light of local and 
human rights dimensions of the wider black freedom movement. 
Special attention to leadership, economics, local movements, and 
white resistance. (Alt Spring) 

333 American Indian History to 1840 (3:3) 

Explores the history of American Indians in the area now encom- 
passed by the United States through the era of Indian Removal in 
the 1830s. (Fall or Spring) 

334 United States Environmental History (3:3) 

Examines the interaction of humans and nature in American his- 
tory from the colonial period to today. (Fall or Spring) 



335 The American Colonial Period, 1607-1763 (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

Selected topics pertaining to development of colonies to eve of 
American Revolution. 

336 The Age of the Democratic Revolution, 1764-1789 (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

The politics, social structure, warfare, and ideology of the Ameri- 
can Revolution set against the background of early modern 
European thought and modern American constitutional develop- 
ment. 

337 The Age of Jefferson and Jackson, 1789-1848 (3:3) 

A study of American History, 1789-1848, including examination 
of political events and politicians, economic and social trends and 
developments, and growth of sectionalism. 

338 Civil War, Reconstruction, and Reunion, 1848-1896 (3:3) 

American history from the end of the Mexican War to the Bryan 
campaign, centering on the slavery controversy, Civil War and 
Reconstruction, industrialization, urbanization, and agrarian 
problems. 

339 War, Society, and Reform: America, 1896-1945 (3:3) 

Examines the impact during the first half of the twentieth century 
of two world wars, reform, industrialization, the changing status 
of women and minorities, and the emergence of mass culture. 

340 The United States since World War II (3:3) 

Selected social, political, and international trends and events: 
Cold War and Vietnam; conservatism from McCarthy to Reagan; 
black freedom, radicalism and the Great Society; feminism; mass 
immigration and multicultural America. 

341 Pirates of the Caribbean: The Real Story (3:3) 

Introduces students to the fascinating, complex, and chang- 
ing roles of corsairs, buccaneers, and privateers in shaping the 
emerging colonial economies, societies, and cultures of the early 
modern Caribbean. (Fall or Spring or Summer) 

342 U.S. Women and their Bodies (3:3) 

Women's bodies and health in historical perspective. Topics 
include: anatomy, menstruation, childbirth, birth control, abor- 
tion, violence, pregnancy, nutrition, eating disorders, HIV/AIDS, 
menopause, breast cancer, and sexuality. (Alt Years) 

343 The Old South (3:3) 

Economy, society, and polity of the South from colonial times 
to the Civil War. The institution of slavery. Emphasis on period 
1820-1860. 

344 The New South (3:3) 

Southern history from Reconstruction to the present. Emphasis 
on race, politics, agriculture, and industry. 

345 The Unfit: Race Cleansing in the United States (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

History of America's role in international eugenics. Themes 
include racial nationalism; fears of race suicide; and the segre- 
gation and sterilization of nonwhites, women, Jews, immigrants, 
and the disabled to "cleanse" humanity. (Spring or Summer) 

347 History of North Carolina (3:3) 

History of North Carolina from its colonial origins to the twenti- 
eth century, including the evolution of its political system, econ- 
omy, social structure, and culture. 

348 The World at War, 1914-1918 (3:3) 

Origins, course, and impact of the First World War. Emphasis 
on political, social, and cultural as well as military perspectives. 
(Fall) 



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349 The World at War, 1939-1945 (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Emphasis on the political systems responsible for the Second 
World War, military establishments that fought it, the popula- 
tions that suffered it, and sociopolitical and cultural changes it 
brought about. (Spring) 

351 History of Greece, 2000 b.c-31 b.c. (3:3) 

Mycenaean society, Greek "dark ages," colonization and tyranny, 
Athens and Sparta, flowering in the fifth and fourth centuries, 
conquests of Alexander, Hellenistic empires, and the diffusion of 
Greek civilization. (Same as CCI 351) 

353 Athens in the Fifth Century b.c. (3:3) 

Pr. 220 or 351 or permission of instructor 
Study of the social and political history of Athens in the fifth cen- 
tury b.c. Ruzicka (Same as CCI 353) 

354 The Roman Republic, 754 b.c-44 b.c. (3:3) 

Study of the social and political forces that led to Rome's conquest 
of the Mediterranean World — and of the transformation which 
world conquest wrought on Rome itself. Topics covered include: 
the Roman Constitution and politics, the Roman conquest of 
Italy and then of the whole Mediterranean, and the decline of the 
Republic. (Same as CCI 354) 

355 The Roman Empire, 44 b.c.-a.d. 337 (3:3) 

GE Marker: GE 
Survey of politics and society at Rome under the Empire, when 
Rome dominated Western Civilization. Topics covered include: 
Augustus and the rise of one-man rule at Rome, the long "Roman 
Peace" and the civilizing of Europe under the Emperors, the rise 
of Christianity, and the transformed Empire of Constantine the 
Great. (Same as CCI 355) 

359 Sexuality in Historical Perspective (3:3) 

Survey of the history of sexuality since the 17th century, with 
emphasis on America. Topics include agrarian sexual patterns, 
the impact of industrialization, Victorianism, birth control, the 
effects of Freud, and the 20th-century "sexual revolution." 

360 The Structure of Scientific Change: Topics in the 
History of Science (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GMO 

In-depth examination of selected topics to elucidate the nature of 
scientific change. Representative topics: Thomas Kuhn's image of 
science; the Chemical Revolution; evolution; relativity. 

363 European Economic History (3:3) 

Pr. ECO 201 
Study of the evolution of European economies from early modern 
times to the twentieth century. Emphasis on sources of growth: 
trade, migration, industry, technical change, labor, and capital. 
(Same as ECO 363) 

364 The French Revolutionary Era (3:3) 

France in the age of the French Revolution, including the old 
regime, Enlightenment, narrative and interpretive treatment of 
the Revolution. 

365 Modern France (3:3) 

Social, political, and cultural forces that shaped France through 
the Third Republic, World Wars, rise of communism and fascism, 
Occupation and Resistance, postwar Fourth and Fifth Republics. 

368 Medieval Thought and Learning from 300 to 1500 (3:3) 

A survey of the formation of a medieval intellectual tradition and 
its institutional expression in the Latin West from late Roman 
times to the sixteenth century. 



369 History of Spain (3:3) 

GECore: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GPM 

Exploration of major themes in Spanish history, including the 
concept of crusade, the experience of empire, and struggle for 
religious, ethnic, and political unity. Focuses on Spain during its 
"Golden Age" (1500-1700). 

370 Revolutions in 20th-century Latin America (3:3) 

Comparative history of revolution in twentieth-century Bolivia, 
Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, and Nicaragua. 

371 Europe since World War I (3:3) 

GE Core: GHP GE Marker: GL CAR: GMO 

A survey of modern Europe with emphasis on the two world 
wars, political ideologies and cultural developments, and the 
postwar movement to European integration. 

373 English History to 1660 (3:3) 

GECore: GHP CAR: GPM 

Origins and evolution of English culture and English constitu- 
tion. 

374 British History 1688-Present (3:3) 

GE Core: GHP CAR: GMO 

Major landmarks in the social, political, intellectual, and cultural 
history of the diverse peoples of the British Isles from the Glori- 
ous Revolution of 1688 to the 21st century. 

375 Germany in the Nineteenth Century, 1800-1914 (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Examination of German social and political structures and their 
functioning between 1800 and outbreak of World War I. Atten- 
dant emphasis placed upon cultural and intellectual issues which 
illuminate German (and European) culture of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. 

376 German History, 1914-1945 (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
German social and political structures and their functioning dur- 
ing World War I, Weimar Republic, and Third Reich with atten- 
dant emphasis on cultural and intellectual themes. 

377 Russian History to 1900 (3:3) 

Introduction to old Russia of Kiev and Muscovy, followed by a 
more intensive survey of eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. 

378 Russian History since 1900 (3:3) 

End of Tsarist Empire, Revolution of 1917 and its aftermath, 
Soviet Union under Stalin, and recent developments. 

381 The Near and Middle East (3:3) 

GE Core: GHP GE Marker: GN CAR: GMO 

Emphasizes developments since World War I. 
382C Experimental Course: Globalization, 1400-1750 (3:3) 
The overseas expansion of Europe, the creation of empires and 
colonies in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean basins, and the effects 
on local economies, societies, and cultures. (Offered fall '07) 

383 Chinese History to 1800 (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Early Chinese Civilization: Imperial Period; first dynasties; Early 
Modern China. 

384 The Modern Transformation of China: 1800 to Present 
Day (3:3) 

GE Marker: GN 
Coming of Europeans; decline of imperial institutions to 1870; 
Western impact and Chinese reforms, 1870-1945; contemporary 
China. 



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385 Japanese History to 1867, Izanagi and Izanami to 
Emperor Meiji (3:3) 

Creation myths— archaeological record, warrior aristocracy 
under Chinese veneer, Japanese feudalism: Shoguns, daimyo 
samurai, servants of Christ, diplomats, seclusion, and civil war. 

386 Creating Modern Japan, 1867 to the Present (3:3) 

Meiji Restoration and the West, Radical Nationalism, Parlia- 
mentary government, World War II from Manchurian Incident 
through MacArthur. Present day Japan. 

389 West Africa during the Atlantic Slave Trade (3:3) 

Examines how trade between European and African countries 
developed into a trans-Atlantic slave trade. Focus on origins of 
slaves and effects of slave trade on Africa, ca. 1450-1850. 

390 History Internship (3) 

Pr. minimum of 12 s.h. with a 3.0 GPA in history and permission of 
Director of Undergraduate Studies 

• May be repeated for credit. 
Field learning experience in public or applied history. Academic 
supervision provided by job supervisor. Assigned reading and 
written reports. 

392 The Holocaust: History and Meaning (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
This course examines the history of the Nazi Holocaust during 
World War II and explores a variety of meanings — intellectual 
and artistic — that have been imposed upon it. 

393 Medieval Church and State (3:3) 

GE Marker: GL 
Course examines origins, elaboration, and impact of political 
thought in the West as it arose out of the ongoing transformation 
of the medieval church and state from circa 300-1500. 

394 Honors Seminar in American History (3:3) 

Pr. History majors with a minimum 3.30 GPA who are enrolled in 
the